Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Deglutition and Disorders [Words]
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[PMID]: 29400042
[Au] Autor:Vatin L; Lagier A; Legou T; Galant C; Arnaud-Pellet MN; Hadj M; Cheynet F; Chossegros C; Giovanni A
[Ti] Title:[Dynamic palatography: Diagnostic tool for dysfunc­tional swallowing? Feasibility study].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(5):181-4, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Dysfunctional swallowing may cause transverse occlusal disorders. The speech re-education of dysfunctional swallowing aims to correct or prevent the recurrence of occlu­sal disorders. The main objective was to test the dynamic palato­graphy as a diagnosis and quantification tool of the dysfunctional swallowing. Material and methods: The study was prospective and descriptive. Twelve average 23.5 years old women with a clinical dysfunctional swallowing have been included between January and May 2014. None was aware of presenting an atypical swallowing or dento-facial dysmorphism of class II. The dynamic palatography device measured the pressure force of the language on the palate during the lingual rest, swallowing saliva and water. Parameters measured were the duration and magnitude of support of the tongue on the palate. Results: Dynamic palatography showed a trend to predominant anterior contact during rest position (25%), and lower position of the language with little contact during swallo­wing of saliva and water. Discussion: Palatography results are consistent with the clinical diagnostic criteria of atypical swallo­wing. Our palatography tool has the advantage of being unobtrusive in the mouth compared to other pre existing systems. This device should be tested on larger patient popu­la­tions and could enable monitore atypical swallowing rehabili­ta­tion efficiency. The palatography could complete the swallo­wing assessment and be a monitoring and rehabilitation tool in real time.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis
Speech Production Measurement/instrumentation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29400032
[Au] Autor:Balde D; Ayi Megnanglo A; Diallo BK
[Ti] Title:[Eagle's syndrome: A case report ].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(3):121-3, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Eagle syndrome, also termed stylohyoid syndrome is a radioclinical entity characterized by an elongated styloid process. Although frequent, it remains largely underdiagnosed by clinicians [1]. We report one case of Eagle syndrome studied at the ENT and radiology departments of the Heinrich Lübke hospital in Dioubrel. Radiologic, therapeutic and clinical data have been documented. The aim of our work is to report a case of Eagle syndrome in a 32 year old patient and to present the diversity of the presenting symptoms, the diagnostic challenges and the therapeutic options. Conclusion: Eagle syndrome represents an unusual and underappreciated entity and must be sought after in every underlying pharyngeal symptomatology with a normal clinical examination.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ossification, Heterotopic/surgery
Temporal Bone/abnormalities
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Deglutition Disorders/etiology
Female
Humans
Ossification, Heterotopic/diagnostic imaging
Temporal Bone/diagnostic imaging
Temporal Bone/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367332
[Au] Autor:Smith EE; Kent DM; Bulsara KR; Leung LY; Lichtman JH; Reeves MJ; Towfighi A; Whiteley WN; Zahuranec DB; American Heart Association Stroke Council
[Ti] Title:Effect of Dysphagia Screening Strategies on Clinical Outcomes After Stroke: A Systematic Review for the 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(3):e123-e128, 2018 03.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia screening protocols have been recommended to identify patients at risk for aspiration. The American Heart Association convened an evidence review committee to systematically review evidence for the effectiveness of dysphagia screening protocols to reduce the risk of pneumonia, death, or dependency after stroke. METHODS: The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched on November 1, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysphagia screening protocols or quality interventions with increased dysphagia screening rates and reporting outcomes of pneumonia, death, or dependency. RESULTS: Three RCTs were identified. One RCT found that a combined nursing quality improvement intervention targeting fever and glucose management and dysphagia screening reduced death and dependency but without reducing the pneumonia rate. Another RCT failed to find evidence that pneumonia rates were reduced by adding the cough reflex to routine dysphagia screening. A smaller RCT randomly assigned 2 hospital wards to a stroke care pathway including dysphagia screening or regular care and found that patients on the stroke care pathway were less likely to require intubation and mechanical ventilation; however, the study was small and at risk for bias. CONCLUSIONS: There were insufficient RCT data to determine the effect of dysphagia screening protocols on reducing the rates of pneumonia, death, or dependency after stroke. Additional trials are needed to compare the validity, feasibility, and clinical effectiveness of different screening methods for dysphagia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STR.0000000000000159

  4 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29300422
[Au] Autor:Wakabayashi H; Matsushima M; Ichikawa H; Murayama S; Yoshida S; Kaneko M; Mutai R
[Ad] Address:Hidetaka Wakabayashi, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-chou, Minami ward, Yokohama City, Japan 232-0024, E-mail: noventurenoglory@gmail.com, Tel: +81-45-261-5656; Fax: +81-45-253-9955.
[Ti] Title:Occlusal Support, Dysphagia, Malnutrition, and Activities of Daily Living in Aged Individuals Needing Long-Term Care: A Path Analysis.
[So] Source:J Nutr Health Aging;22(1):53-58, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1760-4788
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine the interrelationships among occlusal support, dysphagia, malnutrition, and activities of daily living in aged individuals needing long-term care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study and path analysis. SETTING: Long-term health care facilities, acute care hospitals, and the community. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred and fifty-four individuals aged ≥ 65 years with dysphagia or potential dysphagia in need of long-term care. MEASUREMENTS: The modified Eichner Index, Dysphagia Severity Scale, Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form, and Barthel index. RESULTS: The participants included 118 males and 236 females with a mean (standard deviation) age of 83 (8) years. A total of 216 participants had functional occlusal support with or without dentures. Of the total participants, 73 were within normal limits regarding the severity of dysphagia, 119 exhibited dysphagia without aspiration, and 162 exhibited dysphagia with aspiration. Only 34 had a normal nutritional status, while 166 participants were malnourished, and 154 were at risk of malnutrition. The median Barthel index score was 30. Path analysis indicated two important findings: occlusal support had a direct effect on dysphagia (standard coefficient = 0.33), and dysphagia was associated directly with malnutrition (standard coefficient = 0.50). Dysphagia and malnutrition were associated directly with impaired activities of daily living (standard coefficient = 0.57, 0.22). CONCLUSION: In aged individuals needing long-term care, occlusal support is associated directly with dysphagia and indirectly with malnutrition and activities of daily living via dysphagia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12603-017-0897-0

  5 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29287693
[Au] Autor:Ogawa N; Mori T; Fujishima I; Wakabayashi H; Itoda M; Kunieda K; Shigematsu T; Nishioka S; Tohara H; Yamada M; Ogawa S
[Ad] Address:Department of Gerontology and Gerodontology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Ultrasonography to Measure Swallowing Muscle Mass and Quality in Older Patients With Sarcopenic Dysphagia.
[So] Source:J Am Med Dir Assoc;, 2017 Dec 26.
[Is] ISSN:1538-9375
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by difficulty swallowing due to a loss of whole-body skeletal and swallowing muscle mass and function. However, no study has reported on swallowing muscle mass and quality in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences in swallowing muscle mass and quality between sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic dysphagia. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in 55 older patients, who had been recommended to undergo dysphagia assessment and/or rehabilitation. Sarcopenic dysphagia was diagnosed using a diagnostic algorithm for sarcopenic dysphagia. The thickness and area of tongue muscle and geniohyoid muscle (coronal plane and sagittal plane), and the echo-intensity of the tongue and geniohyoid muscles were examined by ultrasound. RESULTS: The study participants included 31 males and 24 females (mean age of 82 ± 7 years), with 14 having possible sarcopenic dysphagia, 22 probable sarcopenic dysphagia, and 19 without sarcopenic dysphagia. The group with sarcopenic dysphagia had a significantly lower cross-sectional area and area of brightness of the tongue muscle than that observed in the group without sarcopenic dysphagia. The most specific factor for identifying the presence of sarcopenic dysphagia was tongue muscle area (sensitivity, 0.389; specificity, 0.947; cut-off value, 1536.0), while the factor with the highest sensitivity was geniohyoid muscle area brightness in sagittal sections (sensitivity, 0.806; specificity, 0.632; cut-off value, 20.1). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the area of the tongue muscle and its area of brightness were independent risk factors for sarcopenic dysphagia. However, geniohyoid sagittal muscle area and area of brightness showed no significant independent association with sarcopenic dysphagia. CONCLUSION: Tongue muscle mass in patients with sarcopenic dysphagia was smaller than that in patients without the condition. Sarcopenic dysphagia was also associated with increased intensity of the tongue muscle.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497830
[Au] Autor:Sherman V; Flowers H; Kapral MK; Nicholson G; Silver F; Martino R
[Ad] Address:Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, 160-500 University Avenue, Rehabilitation Sciences Building, Toronto, ON, M5G 1V7, Canada. victoria.currie@mail.utoronto.ca.
[Ti] Title:Screening for Dysphagia in Adult Patients with Stroke: Assessing the Accuracy of Informal Detection.
[So] Source:Dysphagia;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0460
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Early identification of dysphagia by screening is recommended best practice for patients admitted to hospital with acute stroke. Screening can reduce the risk of pneumonia and promote stroke recovery, yet some institutions do not utilize a formal screening protocol. This study assessed the accuracy of informal dysphagia detection prior to implementation of a formal screening protocol. We conducted a secondary analysis of data captured between 2003 and 2008 from a sample of 250 adult stroke survivors admitted to a tertiary care centre. Using a priori criteria, patient medical records were reviewed for notation about dysphagia; if present, the date/time of notation, writer's profession, and suggestion of dysphagia presence. To assess accuracy of notations indicating dysphagia presence, we used speech language pathology (SLP) assessments as the criterion reference. There were 221 patient medical records available for review. Patients were male (56%), averaged 68 years (SD = 15.0), with a mean Canadian Neurological Scale score of 8.1 (SD = 3.0). First notations of swallowing by SLP were excluded. Of the remaining 170 patients, 147 (87%) had first notations (104 by nurses; 40 by physicians) within a median of 24.3 h from admission. Accuracy of detecting dysphagia from informal notations was low, with a sensitivity of 36.7% [95% CI, 24.9, 50.1], but specificity was high (94.2% [95% CI, 86.5, 97.9]). Informal identification methods, although timely, are suboptimal in their accuracy to detect dysphagia and leave patients with stroke at risk for poor health outcomes. Given these findings, we encourage the use of psychometrically validated formal screening protocols to identify dysphagia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00455-018-9885-8

  7 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497831
[Au] Autor:Murray J; Scholten I; Doeltgen S
[Ad] Address:Speech Pathology, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia. joanne.murray@flinders.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Factors Contributing to Hydration, Fluid Intake and Health Status of Inpatients With and Without Dysphagia Post Stroke.
[So] Source:Dysphagia;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0460
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dysphagia has been strongly associated with poor hydration in acute stroke settings. However, in sub-acute settings, the contribution to dehydration of dysphagia in combination with other common stroke comorbidities has not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate which demographic and stroke comorbidities, including dysphagia, contribute most significantly to oral fluid intake, hydration status and specific adverse health outcomes for patients in sub-acute rehabilitation following stroke. Data from 100 inpatients from three Australian rehabilitation facilities (14 with confirmed dysphagia and 86 without dysphagia) were analysed. Hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to determine which demographic or stroke comorbidities were most predictive of each outcome: average daily fluid intake; Blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio as an index of hydration and medically diagnosed adverse events of pneumonia, dehydration, urinary tract infection or constipation. Average daily beverage intake (M = 1448 ml, SD 369 ml) was significantly and independently predicted by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at admission (F change = 9.212, p = 0.004). BUN/Cr ratio (M = 20, SD 5.16) was predicted only by age (F change = 4.026, p = 0.049). Adverse health events, diagnosed for 20% of participants, were significantly predicted by Admission FIM (OR 1.040, 95% CI 1.001, 1.081, p = 0.047). Dysphagia was not a significant predictor of any of the outcomes measured. Rather, overall functional dependency was the most significant predictor of poor oral fluid intake and fluid-related adverse health outcomes in sub-acute stroke. Clinical Trial number: Data for the post hoc analysis presented in this article came from the registered trial ACTRN12610000752066.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00455-018-9886-7

  8 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390393
[Au] Autor:Li X; Wu L; Guo F; Liang X; Fu H; Li N
[Ad] Address:Acupuncture and Moxibustion Four Ward, Second Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Quick needle insertion at pharyngeal acupoints for poststroke dysphagia: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9299, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Dysphagia following stroke is a major complaint among patients, and effective treatment of post-stroke dysphagia can be difficult. We present a case report describing a new treatment for dysphagia, namely, quick needle insertion at pharyngeal acupoints. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 70-year-old man developed pharyngeal dysphagia after a stroke. Three months after the patient experienced a sudden stroke leading to liquid dysphagia, acupuncture, one of the most important therapies in Traditional Chinese Medicine, was used to treat the patient. DIAGNOSES: A diagnosis of cerebral infarction and bulbar paralysis was made. INTERVENTIONS: Quick needle insertion was performed at five pharyngeal acupoints, once a day, 6 times a week for 6 weeks. OUTCOMES: The patient subsequently showed significant improvement in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. His performance in the drinking water test reduced to level 1 from level 4. The functional oral intake scale score changed from level 2 to level 7. In the video fluoroscopic swallowing study, no spillage occurred, but aspiration was present. The residue of the contrast agent was reduced. LESSONS: Quick needle insertion at pharyngeal acupoints can be an efficient way to treat post-stroke dysphagia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy/methods
Deglutition Disorders/etiology
Deglutition Disorders/therapy
Pharynx
Stroke/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009299

  9 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390364
[Au] Autor:Salehi P; Stafford HJ; Glass RP; Leavitt A; Beck AE; McAfee A; Ambartsumyan L; Chen M
[Ad] Address:Division of Endocrine, Seattle Children's Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Silent aspiration in infants with Prader-Willi syndrome identified by videofluoroscopic swallow study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9256, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Feeding intolerance in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) infants is well-recognized, but their swallow physiology is not well understood. Swallow dysfunction increases risks of respiratory compromise and choking, which have a high incidence in PWS. To investigate swallow pathology in PWS infants we undertook a retrospective review of videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in infants with PWS seen at our institution. We hypothesize that VFSS will characterize swallow pathology suspected by clinical observation during a feeding evaluation and may help determine feeding safety in these infants.Retrospective review of 23 VFSS on 10 PWS infants (average age 9.7 ±â€Š8.4 months; range 3 weeks-29 months). Logistic regression models evaluated associations between gender, genetic subtype, and growth hormone (GH) use on aspiration incidence. Polysomnographic (PSG) studies conducted on the same participant ±1 year from VFSS were examined to characterize respiratory abnormalities.There was a high rate of swallowing dysfunction (pharyngeal residue 71%, aspiration events 87%) and disordered sleep. All aspiration events were silent. There were no differences in rates of aspiration for gender, genetic subtype, or GH use.A high incidence of aspiration was identified indicating swallow dysfunction may frequently be present in infants with PWS. Comprehensive evaluation of feeding and swallowing is essential and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Providers should recognize risk factors for swallow dysfunction and consider a multidisciplinary approach to guide decision making and optimize feeding safety in PWS.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deglutition Disorders/physiopathology
Prader-Willi Syndrome/physiopathology
Respiratory Aspiration/diagnostic imaging
Respiratory Aspiration/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Female
Fluoroscopy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Video Recording
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009256

  10 / 17901 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390268
[Au] Autor:Sun L; Zhang L; Hu W; Li TF; Liu S
[Ad] Address:Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:Case report: One case of primary AL amyloidosis repeatedly misdiagnosed as scleroderma.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e8771, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Amyloid light chain (AL) results from the deposition of immunoglobulin light chain fragments, and can affect multiple organs/systems. Our patient was diagnosed as scleroderma repeatedly because of extensive skin thickening and hardening, but the treatment was not effective. We did extensive laboratory examinations including serum/urine protein electrophoresis and flow cytometry assay of bone marrow aspiration. CONCLUSION: A diagnosis of primary AL amyloidosis was established.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amyloidosis/diagnosis
Diagnostic Errors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biopsy
Deglutition Disorders/etiology
Female
Hoarseness/etiology
Humans
Macroglossia/etiology
Middle Aged
Scleroderma, Localized/diagnosis
Skin/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008771


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