Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Dermoid and Cyst [Words]
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[PMID]: 29211701
[Au] Autor:Zhong J; Deng Y; Zhang P; Li S; Huang H; Wang B; Zhang H; Peng L; Yang R; Xu J; Yuan J
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:New Grading System for Limbal Dermoid: A Retrospective Analysis of 261 Cases Over a 10-Year Period.
[So] Source:Cornea;37(1):66-71, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4798
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To establish a new scoring system for limbal dermoid, in order to unify the diagnostic criteria and assess the prognosis. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on 261 patients with limbal dermoid. The basic information, clinical features, and pathology of dermoids were recorded, and the prognosis at 1 year after keratoplasty was assessed at follow-up. A new visual scoring system was created for the area of corneal involvement, the area of conjunctival involvement, and the surface shape. RESULTS: There were 154 females and 107 males with mean age of 4 ± 3 years at surgery. After scoring, 59% (136) of patients were classified as grade I, 26% (60) as grade II, and 14% (33) as grade III. The pathological results were 124 dermoid cases, 76 lipodermoid, 5 complex choristoma, and 10 epibulbar osseous choristoma. Moreover, patients with lower clinical scores presented a better prognosis; the mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) best-corrected visual acuity in grade I patients was 0.38 ± 0.05, which was better than the grade II value of 0.61 ± 0.09 (P < 0.05) and the grade III value of 0.94 ± 0.11 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: New grading systems for limbal dermoid were useful for clinical diagnosis and may have prognostic value in predicting visual acuity. A lower-grade dermoid exhibited better vision postoperatively.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Corneal Diseases/diagnosis
Dermoid Cyst/diagnosis
Eye Neoplasms/diagnosis
Limbus Corneae/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Corneal Diseases/surgery
Dermoid Cyst/surgery
Eye Neoplasms/surgery
Female
Humans
Infant
Limbus Corneae/surgery
Male
Neoplasm Grading
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Visual Acuity/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICO.0000000000001429

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[PMID]: 29497194
[Au] Autor:Thukral-Mahajan P; Shah N; Kalra G; Andrade C
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Masina Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
[Ti] Title:Electroconvulsive therapy for medication-refractory depression in a patient with ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst, meningioma, and neurofibromatosis.
[So] Source:Indian J Psychiatry;59(4):493-495, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0019-5545
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered relatively contraindicated in patients with intracranial space-occupying lesions. A 53-year-old male presented with a 5-year history of medication-refractory major depressive disorder. Brain imaging findings suggested the presence of a ruptured dermoid cyst in the transverse sinus and a calcified meningioma in the temporal lobe sulcal space. There was no evidence of mass effect. Neurofibromatosis was the only other clinical condition present. The patient had no clinical neurological deficits. Since the depression was severe and he was suicidal, ECT was advised. There was a substantial improvement after four bilateral and then eight right unilateral brief-pulse ECTs administered on alternate days, thrice weekly. There were no complications associated with ECT. The treatment gains were maintained with maintenance antidepressant medication at a 1-year follow-up. This is probably the first reported case of the use of ECT in a medication-refractory, severely depressed patient with a ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst and with a calcifying meningioma. The results testify to the safety of ECT even in high-risk patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_216_17

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[PMID]: 29454466
[Au] Autor:Kouadria R; Derkaoui M
[Ad] Address:Département de neurochirurgie, faculté de médecine, UDL Sidi Bel-Abbés, Algérie. Electronic address: ribhk@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Kystes dermoïdes de la fosse cérébrale postérieure chez l'enfant révélés par des méningites aseptiques récidivantes : à propos de deux cas et revue de la littérature. [Dermoid cysts of the posterior cerebral fossa in children revealed by recurrent aseptic meningitis: Report of two cases and a review of the literature].
[So] Source:Neurochirurgie;, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1773-0619
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Dermoid cysts of central nervous system are very rare. The usual clinical presentation is dominated by intracranial hypertension, epilepsy and cranial palsy. The revelation mode could be recurrent aseptic meningitis. AIM: The aim of this case report is to consider the dermoid cyst as regards the differential diagnosis in children treated for recurrent aseptic meningitis to avoid misdiagnosis and ice qui a orienté le diagnostic à une méningitnadequate treatment. METHODS: Two children were admitted in the pediatric department for recurrent aseptic meningitis. The MRI confirmed the presence of a posterior fossa dermoid cyst. RESULTS: Loss of meningitis after microsurgical resection. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of dermoid cyst is performed and reconsidered at an early stage in aseptic meningitis in order to establish an adequate therapy, which is surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29446701
[Au] Autor:Foster D; Sinclair TJ; Taylor JS; Dutta S; Lorenz HP; Bruzoni M
[Ad] Address:1 Department of General Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford, California.
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic Excision of Benign Facial Masses in Children: A Review of Outcomes.
[So] Source:J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1557-9034
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Benign masses of the eyebrow and forehead are common in pediatric patients and can result in facial asymmetry, discomfort, or super-infection. Excision is classically conducted via an incision directly over the mass, which can produce sub-optimal cosmesis. Recently, an endoscopic approach using pediatric brow-lift equipment has been adopted. We reviewed our center's experience with endoscopic removal of benign facial lesions and compared these cases with an equivalent series of open cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify pediatric cases of endoscopic and open removal of benign eyebrow or forehead lesions at our institution from 2009 to 2016. Clinical and cosmetic outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 40 endoscopic and 25 open cases of excision of benign facial lesions in children were identified. For the patients who underwent endoscopic excision, the majority (85%) presented with a cyst located at the eyebrow. Histologic examination revealed 36 dermoid cysts (90%), 2 epidermal cysts, and 2 pilomatrixomas. Of the 36 cases with post-operative follow-up, 32 patients (89%) had an uncomplicated recovery with good cosmesis. Two patients had an eyebrow droop that resolved without intervention. One patient had localized numbness overlying the site, but no motor deficits. One patient presented with a recurrent dermoid cyst that required open resection. For the patients who underwent open excision, the majority (52%) had dermoid cysts located at the eyebrow. Of the 22 cases with follow-up, 20 of the patients had an uncomplicated recovery (90%). Comparing the rate of complications, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 1.0). CONCLUSION: Endoscopic excision of benign forehead and eyebrow lesions in pediatric patients is feasible and yields excellent cosmetic results. When compared with open excision, complication rates are similar between both approaches and a facial scar can be avoided with an endoscopic approach.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1089/lap.2017.0168

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[PMID]: 29439906
[Au] Autor:Aoun SG; Liu MA; Still M; El Ahmadieh TY; Tamimi MA; Gluf W
[Ad] Address:The University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Neurological Surgery, United States. Electronic address: Salah.aoun@phhs.org.
[Ti] Title:Dermoid cysts of the conus medullaris: Clinical review, case series and management strategies.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The management of dermoid cysts can be tedious as they have a tendency to recur, and respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation. Management is especially difficult for tumors involving highly eloquent areas such as the conus medullaris. OBJECTIVE: We aim to provide a summary of the pathology, clinical presentation, and operative management strategies of dermoid cysts involving the conus medullaris. METHODS: Two clinical cases of dermoid cysts of the conus are presented, as well as a commented surgical video. RESULTS: A 33 year-old man with a history of cystic conus medullaris tumor presented with progressive low back pain and loss of bowel and bladder function. His magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed recurrence of his tumor with tethering of the spinal cord. He was taken for a midline myelotomy that drained yellowish keratinous fluid and decompressed the cyst. No aggressive attempt at complete resection of the cyst wall was undertaken. He made a complete recovery after surgery. A 25 year-old woman with a history of dermoid cyst of the conus that was previously treated surgically, presented with lower extremity weakness and debilitating pain. Her MRI showed significant recurrence of the cystic lesion. She was taken for a midline myelotomy and improved after surgery with complete resolution of her symptoms. CONCLUSION: Dermoid cysts of the conus medullaris are challenging to treat. Surgical control and restraint are key, especially when patients are young and could potentially fully recover and remain in remission for a period of years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29421931
[Au] Autor:Torky HA; Elshenawy AA; Ahmad AM
[Ad] Address:a Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology , October 6th University & As-Salam International Hospital , Cairo , Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Haematocolpos caused by a large vulvar dermoid cyst complicating type Ib female circumcision.
[So] Source:J Obstet Gynaecol;:1-2, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1364-6893
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/01443615.2017.1380614

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[PMID]: 28450777
[Au] Autor:Mahalakshmi S; Reddy S; Ramamurthy TK; Shilpa B
[Ad] Address:Department of Oralmedicine and radiology, Sri Siddhartha Dental College and Hospital, Sri Siddhartha Academy of Higher Education, Agalkote, Tumkur.
[Ti] Title:Rare Locations of Epidermoid Cyst: Case Reports and Review.
[So] Source:Ethiop J Health Sci;26(6):595-601, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2413-7170
[Cp] Country of publication:Ethiopia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Epidermoid cysts are benign lesions encountered throughout the body. Eighty percent of epidermoid cyst seen in ovaries and testicles, whereas in head and neck region they account for only 1.6-7.0%. 1.6% of epidermoid cysts occur in oral cavity and they account for 0.01% of all the oral cavity cysts. CASE DETAILS: Two case reports of epidermoid cyst has been discussed. One patient reported with well defined swelling in the right lower one third of the face, another one in the upper lip. Initially the cases were diagnosed as Lipoma and salivary adenoma respectively but histologically they turned out to be epidermoid cyst. Hence, we aim at highlighting the differential diagnosis pertaining to the anatomical location. The PubMed database search made on January 2016 yielded 674 articles of epidermoid cyst in the head and neck region. In that there is only one case reported occuring in the lower one third of face. In the current report, we outline the second case of epidermoid cyst localized to the right mandibular body region without bone involvement. Another case in our report was localized in the upper lip. In the literature totally seven cases were reported till now occurring in the lip. CONCLUSION: Although epidermoid cysts are rarely encountered in the oral cavity, the possibility that they may occur warrants the need for successful management to avoid misdiagnosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Epidermal Cyst/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Face
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29279962
[Au] Autor:Mrowczynski OD; Lane JR; Shoja MM; Specht CS; Langan ST; Rizk EB
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA. omrowczynski@pennstatehealth.psu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Double dermal sinus tracts of the cervical and thoracic regions: a case in a 3-year-old child and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Childs Nerv Syst;, 2017 Dec 26.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0350
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Dermal sinus tracts are rare congenital abnormalities characterized by an epithelium-lined tract that extends from the subcutaneous tissue to the underlying thecal sac or neural tube. These developmental anomalies can present asymptomatically with a cutaneous dimple or with devastating complications including recurrent episodes of meningitis, or neurological complications including paralysis. Dermal sinus tracts generally occur as single lesions, and the presentation of midline double dermal sinus tracts of the cervical and thoracic regions has not been previously described. METHODS: Here, we present the case of a 3-year-old girl suffering from recurrent episodes of myelitis, paraparesis, and intramedullary intradural masses, who was diagnosed with double dermal sinus tracts of the cervical and thoracic regions. We also present a summary of all previous reported cases of multiple dermal sinus tracts. RESULTS: Our patient was successfully treated surgically and is now 2 years status post her last procedure with a significant improvement in her neurologic function and normal muscle strength and tone for her age, and there was no recurrence of her symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment with prophylactic surgery should be performed when possible, but removal of these lesions once symptoms have arisen can also lead to success, as in the case presented here. Complete excision and intradural exploration is required to excise the complete tract.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171227
[Lr] Last revision date:171227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00381-017-3707-4

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[PMID]: 29260294
[Au] Autor:Gupta A; Rajshekhar V
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Fatty filum terminale (FFT) as a secondary tethering element in children with closed spinal dysraphism.
[So] Source:Childs Nerv Syst;, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0350
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of FFT as an additional tethering element in children operated for closed spinal dysraphism, where FFT was not the primary tethering pathology. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 195 children (< 18 years of age) who underwent surgery for closed spinal dysraphism and did not have FFT as the primary diagnosis. All patients were operated during the period 2005-2017 by a single surgeon. The commonest diagnosis was a lipomyelomeningocele (LMMC, n = 81, 41.5%), followed by split cord malformations (SCM, types I and II, n = 61, 31.3%), dermal sinus (n = 28, 14.4%), and dermoid cyst (n = 10, 5.1%). Factors such as age and sex, presenting symptoms, intraoperative findings, and radiological presence of a FFT on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented, and the relationship between the primary diagnoses and presence of FFT was analyzed. RESULTS: FFT as a secondary finding was seen in 63 patients (32.3%). The mean age of the cohort was 54 months (4.5 years) and the sex distribution was relatively even (51.8% girls). The commonest symptom at presentation was a swelling in the back, followed by lower limb weakness. The mean duration of symptoms was nearly 30 months. FFT was seen on the MRI and confirmed intraoperatively in 55 patients (28.2%). There were 8 patients (4.1%) where a FFT was seen intraoperatively, but was not diagnosed on the preoperative MRI. In 16 patients, FFT was seen > 2 segments away from the primary tethering pathology, 8 of which mandated a second skin incision for sectioning of the FFT. Secondary FFT was most commonly associated with a SCM (types I and II combined) and was seen in 42.6% of those patients. It was least commonly associated with intradural dermoid cysts. CONCLUSION: The presence of a secondary FFT should be considered and actively sought on preoperative thin-slice T1W axial MR images in the sacral region in all patients with spinal dysraphism. Even if a FFT is not seen on preoperative MR images, the filum should be explored and sectioned if it is in the vicinity of the primary surgical field, especially in patients with SCM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00381-017-3700-y

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[PMID]: 29185056
[Au] Autor:Tassigny D; Fomekong E; Koerts G; Raftopoulos C
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Avenue Hippocrate, 10, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Intramedullary holocord abscess secondary to infected dermoid cyst.
[So] Source:Acta Neurochir (Wien);160(1):209-212, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0942-0940
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the literature, less than ten cases of holocord intramedullary abscess in children have been described. A 15-month-old girl presented with flaccid paraplegia and dermal sinus in the sacral region. MRI highlighted an infected lumbar dermoid cyst. The child underwent surgery to remove the cyst and purulent collection. Five days after surgery, she developed upper limbs paresis. An MRI showed a holocord abscess. A catheter was inserted through a cervical myelotomy into the abscess for drainage with a good postoperative recovery. A rapid management, even for extended or recurrent intramedullary abscess, can prevent potential severe neurological dysfunctions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00701-017-3406-7


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