Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Diabetic and Nephropathies [Words]
References found : 22300 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 2230 go to page                         

  1 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29408865
[Au] Autor:Hoshino J; Furuichi K; Yamanouchi M; Mise K; Sekine A; Kawada M; Sumida K; Hiramatsu R; Hasegawa E; Hayami N; Suwabe T; Sawa N; Hara S; Fujii T; Ohashi K; Kitagawa K; Toyama T; Shimizu M; Takaichi K; Ubara Y; Wada T
[Ad] Address:Nephrology Center, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:A new pathological scoring system by the Japanese classification to predict renal outcome in diabetic nephropathy.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0190923, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The impact of the newly proposed pathological classification by the Japan Renal Pathology Society (JRPS) on renal outcome is unclear. So we evaluated that impact and created a new pathological scoring to predict outcome using this classification. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A multicenter cohort of 493 biopsy-proven Japanese patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) were analyzed. The association between each pathological factor-Tervaert' and JRPS classifications-and renal outcome (dialysis initiation or 50% eGFR decline) was estimated by adjusted Cox regression. The overall pathological risk score (J-score) was calculated, whereupon its predictive ability for 10-year risk of renal outcome was evaluated. RESULTS: The J-scores of diffuse lesion classes 2 or 3, GBM doubling class 3, presence of mesangiolysis, polar vasculosis, and arteriolar hyalinosis were, respectively, 1, 2, 4, 1, and 2. The scores of IFTA classes 1, 2, and 3 were, respectively, 3, 4, and 4, and those of interstitial inflammation classes 1, 2, and 3 were 5, 5, and 4 (J-score range, 0-19). Renal survival curves, when dividing into four J-score grades (0-5, 6-10, 11-15, and 16-19), were significantly different from each other (p<0.01, log-rank test). After adjusting clinical factors, the J-score was a significant predictor of renal outcome. Ability to predict 10-year renal outcome was improved when the J-score was added to the basic model: c-statistics from 0.661 to 0.685; category-free net reclassification improvement, 0.154 (-0.040, 0.349, p = 0.12); and integrated discrimination improvement, 0.015 (0.003, 0.028, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Mesangiolysis, polar vasculosis, and doubling of GBM-features of the JRPS system-were significantly associated with renal outcome. Prediction of DN patients' renal outcome was better with the J-score than without it.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Female
Humans
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190923

  2 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29364972
[Au] Autor:Lee YH
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Medicine & Institute of Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Jeonbuk, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Socioeconomic differences among community-dwelling diabetic adults screened for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy: The 2015 Korean Community Health Survey.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191496, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We investigated the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in community-dwelling diabetics. We analyzed data from 22,134 people with diabetes aged ≥19 years at the time of the nationwide 2015 Korean Community Health Survey. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relationship between SES and screening for DR and DN both before and after adjustment for health behaviors, comorbidities, and educational level. Of all diabetic subjects, 33.9% and 38.1% underwent DR and DN screening, respectively. In the fully adjusted model, the extent of the DR and DN screening trended significantly lower as the educational level fell. Monthly household income was positively associated with DR screening, but a lower odds ratio (OR) for DN screening was evident only when the lowest and highest income groups were compared. Compared with managers/professionals, agricultural/forestry/fishery workers (OR 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.96) and mechanical/manual laborers (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.71-0.97) had lower ORs for DN screening. Residents in rural (compared with urban) areas and widows/widowers (compared with members of couples) were significantly less likely to undergo screening for DR and DN. Similar findings were obtained when the analysis was limited to those who had been educated about diabetes. In conclusion, socioeconomic inequalities were evident in terms of screening for DR and DN in community-dwelling Korean diabetics, regardless of whether they had reported receiving diabetes education. Tailored public health policies (and societal attention) are required to aid the socioeconomically disadvantaged.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetic Nephropathies/diagnosis
Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis
Social Class
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Republic of Korea
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191496

  3 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29413574
[Au] Autor:Gao H; Yu X; Sun R; Yang N; He J; Tao M; Gu H; Yan C; Aa J; Wang G
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Metabolomics, Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative GC-MS assay of citric acid from humans and db/db mice blood serum to assist the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy.
[So] Source:J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci;1077-1078:28-34, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-376X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is rather challenging. Our previous study suggested that citric acid is a potential marker for the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice. For the first time, in this study, a surrogate analyte of C -citric acid was employed to generate calibration curves for the quantitative measurement of the endogenous citric acid in the sera of db/db mice and diabetic nephropathy patients by GC/MS after the analytes were extracted, methoximated and trimethylsilylated. The constant response factor of C -citric acid versus citric acid over the linear range indicated the identical ionization efficiency of these two compounds. The full validation assessments suggested that the method is sensitive, specific, reliable, reproducible and has acceptable parameters. Statistical analysis revealed cut-off citric acid concentrations of 29.24 µg/mL with a 95% confidence interval between 32.75 and 39.16 µg/mL in the diabetic nephropathy patients and 16.74 and 22.57 µg/mL in the normal controls. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves indicated accuracies of over 90% for the diagnoses of early diabetic nephropathy in both humans and db/db mice, which suggests that the serum citric acid level is potentially a biomarker that could assist in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Citric Acid/blood
Diabetic Nephropathies/metabolism
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Diabetic Nephropathies/diagnosis
Drug Stability
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:2968PHW8QP (Citric Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29378549
[Au] Autor:Li S; Pasquin S; Eid HM; Gauchat JF; Saleem A; Haddad PS
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Downtown Postal Station, Montreal, (Quebec), H3C 3J7, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Anti-apoptotic potential of several antidiabetic medicinal plants of the eastern James Bay Cree pharmacopeia in cultured kidney cells.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):37, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Our team has identified 17 Boreal forest species from the traditional pharmacopeia of the Eastern James Bay Cree that presented promising in vitro and in vivo biological activities in the context of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We now screened the 17 plants extracts for potential anti-apoptotic activity in cultured kidney cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: MDCK (Madin-Darnby Canine Kidney) cell damage was induced by hypertonic medium (700 mOsm/L) in the presence or absence of maximal nontoxic concentrations of each of the 17 plant extracts. After 18 h' treatment, cells were stained with Annexin V (AnnV) and Propidium iodide (PI) and subjected to flow cytometry to assess the cytoprotective (AnnV /PI ) and anti-apoptotic (AnnV /PI ) potential of the 17 plant extracts. We then selected a representative subset of species (most cytoprotective, moderately so or neutral) to measure the activity of caspases 3, 8 and 9. RESULTS: Gaultheria hispidula and Abies balsamea are amongst the most powerful cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic plants and appear to exert their modulatory effect primarily by inhibiting caspase 9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway. CONCLUSION: We conclude that several Cree antidiabetic plants exert anti-apoptotic activity that may be relevant in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN) that affects a significant proportion of Cree diabetics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology
Medicine, Traditional
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
Protective Agents/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Annexin A5/chemistry
Apoptosis/drug effects
Canada
Caspases/metabolism
Diabetic Nephropathies/metabolism
Dogs
Hypoglycemic Agents/chemistry
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Propidium/chemistry
Protective Agents/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Annexin A5); 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Protective Agents); 36015-30-2 (Propidium); EC 3.4.22.- (Caspases)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2104-1

  5 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29488390
[Au] Autor:Toffoli B; Zennaro C; Winkler C; Giordano Attianese GMP; Bernardi S; Carraro M; Gilardi F; Desvergne B
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Hemicentin 1 influences podocyte dynamic changes in glomerular diseases.
[So] Source:Am J Physiol Renal Physiol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1466
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Different complex mechanisms control the morphology of podocyte foot processes and their interactions with the underlying basement membrane. Injuries to this system often cause glomerular dysfunction and albuminuria. The present study aimed at identifying early markers of glomerular damage in diabetic nephropathy. For this purpose, we performed a microarray analysis on kidneys of 3-week-old PPARγ null and AZIP/F1 mice, which are two models of diabetic nephropathy due to lipodystrophy. This was followed by functional annotation of the enriched clusters of genes. One of the significant changes in the early stages of glomerular damage was the increase of hemicentin 1 (HMCN1). Its expression and distribution were then studied by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence in various models of glomerular damage and on podocyte cell cultures. HMCN1 progressively increased in the glomeruli of diabetic mice, according to disease severity, as well as in puromycin aminonucleoside (PA)-treated rats. Studies on murine and human podocytes showed an increased HMCN1 deposition upon different pathological stimuli, such as hyperglycemia, TGFß, and PA. In vitro silencing studies showed that HMCN1 mediated the rearrangements of podocyte cytoskeleton induced by TGFß. Finally, we demonstrated an increased expression of HMCN1 in the kidneys of patients with proteinuric nephropathies. In summary, our studies identified HMCN1 as a new molecule involved in the dynamic changes of podocyte foot processes. Its increased expression associated with podocyte dysfunction points to HMCN1 as a possible marker for the early glomerular damage occurring in different proteinuric nephropathies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1152/ajprenal.00198.2017

  6 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29377901
[Au] Autor:Shin S; Jung CH; Choi JY; Kwon HW; Jung JH; Kim YH; Han DJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Long-term effects of pancreas transplant alone on nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients with optimal renal function.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191421, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Limited data are available regarding optimal selection criteria for pancreas transplant alone (PTA) to minimize aggravation of diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 87 type 1 diabetic patients were evaluated before and after PTA at a single center from January, 1999 to December, 2015, together with 87 matched non-transplanted type 1 diabetic subjects who were candidates for PTA to compare deterioration of native kidney function. A total of 163 patients (79 in the transplanted group and 84 in the nontransplanted group) were finally enrolled after excluding nine patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and two patients with moderate proteinuria (≥ 1.5 g/day). RESULTS: A total of seven recipients (8.9%) had end-stage renal disease post-transplant whereas only one patient (1.2%) developed end-stage renal disease in the nontransplanted group during their follow-up period (median 12.0, range 6-96 months) (p = 0.03). Furthermore, a composite of severe renal dysfunction and end-stage renal disease (31.6% vs 2.4%) was significantly higher in the transplanted group (p < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a higher level of tacrolimus at six months post-transplant (HR = 1.648, CI = 1.140-2.385, p = 0.008) was the only significant factor associated with end-stage renal disease. CONCLUSIONS: There is a considerable risk for deterioration of renal function in PTA recipients post-transplant compared with non-transplant diabetic patients. With rather strict selection criteria such as preoperative proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate, PTA should be considered in diabetic patients to minimize post-transplant aggravation of diabetic nephropathy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications
Diabetic Nephropathies/physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies/surgery
Kidney/physiopathology
Pancreas Transplantation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diabetic Nephropathies/complications
Disease Progression
Humans
Male
Proteinuria/complications
Risk Factors
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191421

  7 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29185789
[Au] Autor:Mou Y; Zhang Y; Guo C; Zhao J; Zhang Z; Zhou X; Dong J; Liao L
[Ad] Address:1 Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University , Jinan, China .
[Ti] Title:Integrated Treatment of Prostaglandin E1 and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor in Diabetic Kidney Disease Rats: Possible Role of Antiapoptosis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.
[So] Source:DNA Cell Biol;37(2):133-141, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7430
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To investigate the therapeutic mechanisms underlying prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) on reducing urinary protein in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). DKD rats were established and randomly divided into four groups: PGE1 (10 µg/kg/day) (P group), ACEI (10 mg/kg/day) (A group), combination of PGE1 with ACEI treatment (P + A group), and saline treatment group (DKD group). Untreated rats were used as normal control (N group). Urinary albumin, endothelin-1 (ET-1), angiotensin II (AngII), TUNEL assay, Masson's trichrome staining, and immunohistochemistry staining for CD68 were evaluated in all groups. Ten days after treatment, urinary albumin was significantly decreased in the P and P + A groups (p < 0.01 vs. the DKD group). At the end of 8 weeks, the albumin was still significantly reduced in the P + A group (p < 0.05 vs. the A group). ET-1 and AngII were also significantly decreased in three treatment groups (p < 0.01 vs. the DKD group), especially in the P + A group. Few cells underwent apoptosis in glomerular regions in DKD rats, while amounts of apoptotic cells were seen in tubules regions. Further, apoptosis and the areas of fibrosis in tubulointerstitial were both decreased most in the P + A group compared with the DKD group. Apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells may participate in the development and progression of DKD in rats. Combination of PGE1 with AGEI remarkably protects renal function compared with PGE1 or ACEI monotherapy. The potential therapeutic mechanisms of PGE1 and AGEI might be via multiple targets and, at least in part, through inhibiting the apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alprostadil/pharmacology
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications
Diabetic Nephropathies/drug therapy
Nephritis, Interstitial/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angiotensin II/blood
Animals
Apoptosis/drug effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/blood
Diabetic Nephropathies/blood
Diabetic Nephropathies/etiology
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Endothelin-1/blood
Epithelial Cells/drug effects
Kidney Tubules/drug effects
Kidney Tubules/pathology
Macrophages/immunology
Male
Nephritis, Interstitial/blood
Nephritis, Interstitial/etiology
Rats, Wistar
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Endothelin-1); 11128-99-7 (Angiotensin II); F5TD010360 (Alprostadil)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/dna.2017.3690

  8 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29248299
[Au] Autor:Chen J; Peng Z; Lu M; Xiong X; Chen Z; Li Q; Cheng Z; Jiang D; Tao L; Hu G
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Xiangya School of Pharmacy, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China.
[Ti] Title:Discovery of 1-(4-((3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl)amino)benzyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2(1H)-one, an orally active multi-target agent for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.
[So] Source:Bioorg Med Chem Lett;28(2):222-229, 2018 01 15.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis can cause irreversible damage on cell structure and function of kidney and are key pathological factors in Diabetic Nephropathy (DN). Therefore, multi-target agents are urgently need for the clinical treatment of DN. Using Pirfenidone as a lead compound and based on the previous research, two novel series (5-trifluoromethyl)-2(1H)-pyridone analogs were designed and synthesized. SAR of (5-trifluoromethyl)-2(1H)-pyridone derivatives containing nitrogen heterocyclic ring have been established for in vitro potency. In addition, compound 8, a novel agent that act on multiple targets of anti-DN with IC of 90µM in NIH3T3 cell lines, t of 4.89±1.33h in male rats and LD >2000mg/kg in mice, has been advanced to preclinical studies as an oral treatment for DN.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/drug therapy
Diabetic Nephropathies/drug therapy
Drug Discovery
Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology
Kidney Failure, Chronic/drug therapy
Piperazines/pharmacology
Pyridones/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Administration, Oral
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/chemistry
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/pathology
Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage
Hypoglycemic Agents/chemistry
Kidney Failure, Chronic/pathology
Male
Mice
Molecular Structure
NIH 3T3 Cells
Oxidative Stress/drug effects
Piperazines/administration & dosage
Piperazines/chemistry
Pyridones/administration & dosage
Pyridones/chemistry
Rats
Structure-Activity Relationship
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (1-(4-((3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl)amino)benzyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2(1H)-one); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Piperazines); 0 (Pyridones)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171218
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29450711
[Au] Autor:Wang YC; Feng Y; Lu CQ; Ju S
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 87 Ding Jia Qiao Road, Nanjing, 210009, China.
[Ti] Title:Renal fat fraction and diffusion tensor imaging in patients with early-stage diabetic nephropathy.
[So] Source:Eur Radiol;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1084
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the renal fat fraction and water molecular diffusion features in patients with early-stage DN using Dixon imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). METHODS: Sixty-one type 2 diabetics (normoalbuminuria: n = 40; microalbuminuria: n = 21) and 34 non-diabetic volunteers were included. All participants received three-point Dixon imaging and DTI using a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imager. The fat fraction [FF] and DTI features [fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), tract counts and length from DTI tractography] were collected. All image features were compared between cohorts using one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Renal FF in the microalbuminuric group was significantly higher than in the normoalbuminuric and control groups (5.6% ± 1.3%, 4.7% ± 1.1% and 4.3% ± 0.5%, respectively; p < 0.001). Medullary FA in the microalbuminuric group was the lowest (0.31 ± 0.06) in all cohorts. The tract counts and length in the renal medulla were significantly lower in the microalbuminuric group than in the other two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Dixon imaging and DTI are able to detect renal lipid deposition and water molecule diffusion abnormalities in patients with early-stage DN. Both techniques have the potential to noninvasively evaluate early renal impairment in type 2 diabetes. KEY POINTS: • Dixon imaging demonstrated renal fat deposition in early-stage DN; • Renal fractional anisotropy decreased in patients with early-stage DN; • Renal tractography demonstrated reduced track counts and length in early-stage DN.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00330-017-5298-6

  10 / 22300 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29211853
[Au] Autor:Zhao S; Ghosh A; Lo CS; Chenier I; Scholey JW; Filep JG; Ingelfinger JR; Zhang SL; Chan JSD
[Ad] Address:Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal and Département de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Nrf2 Deficiency Upregulates Intrarenal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2 and Angiotensin 1-7 Receptor Expression and Attenuates Hypertension and Nephropathy in Diabetic Mice.
[So] Source:Endocrinology;159(2):836-852, 2018 02 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7170
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We investigated the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) gene expression in renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) and in the development of systemic hypertension and kidney injury in diabetic Akita mice. We used adult male Akita Nrf2 knockout mice and Akita mice treated with trigonelline (an Nrf2 inhibitor) or oltipraz (an Nrf2 activator). We also examined rat immortalized RPTCs (IRPTCs) stably transfected with control plasmids or plasmids containing rat angiotensinogen (Agt), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (Ace2), or angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) receptor (MasR) gene promoters. Genetic deletion of Nrf2 or pharmacological inhibition of Nrf2 in Akita mice attenuated hypertension, renal injury, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Furthermore, loss of Nrf2 upregulated RPTC Ace2 and MasR expression, increased urinary Ang 1-7 levels, and downregulated expression of Agt, ACE, and profibrotic genes in Akita mice. In cultured IRPTCs, Nrf2 small interfering RNA transfection or trigonelline treatment prevented high glucose stimulation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation, Agt, and ACE transcription with augmentation of Ace2 and MasR transcription, which was reversed by oltipraz. These data identify a mechanism, Nrf2-mediated stimulation of intrarenal RAS gene expression, by which chronic hyperglycemia induces hypertension and renal injury in diabetes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetic Nephropathies/genetics
Hypertension/genetics
Kidney/metabolism
NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angiotensin I/metabolism
Animals
Cells, Cultured
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/metabolism
Diabetic Nephropathies/metabolism
Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Hypertension/complications
Hypertension/metabolism
Hypertension/pathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Transgenic
Peptide Fragments/metabolism
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism
Rats
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2/metabolism
Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics
Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology
Up-Regulation/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (NF-E2-Related Factor 2); 0 (Nfe2l2 protein, mouse); 0 (Peptide Fragments); 0 (Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2); 9041-90-1 (Angiotensin I); EC 3.4.15.1 (Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A); EC 3.4.17.- (angiotensin converting enzyme 2); IJ3FUK8MOF (angiotensin I (1-7))
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1210/en.2017-00752


page 1 of 2230 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information