Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Diffuse and Axonal and Injury [Words]
References found : 1684 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 169 go to page                         

  1 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29360998
[Au] Autor:Tagge CA; Fisher AM; Minaeva OV; Gaudreau-Balderrama A; Moncaster JA; Zhang XL; Wojnarowicz MW; Casey N; Lu H; Kokiko-Cochran ON; Saman S; Ericsson M; Onos KD; Veksler R; Senatorov VV; Kondo A; Zhou XZ; Miry O; Vose LR; Gopaul KR; Upreti C; Nowinski CJ; Cantu RC; Alvarez VE; Hildebrandt AM; Franz ES; Konrad J; Hamilton JA; Hua N; Tripodis Y; Anderson AT; Howell GR; Kaufer D; Hall GF; Lu KP; Ransohoff RM; Cleveland RO; Kowall NW; Stein TD; Lamb BT; Huber BR; Moss WC; Friedman A; Stanton PK; McKee AC; Goldstein LE
[Ad] Address:Molecular Aging and Development Laboratory, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA.
[Ti] Title:Concussion, microvascular injury, and early tauopathy in young athletes after impact head injury and an impact concussion mouse model.
[So] Source:Brain;141(2):422-458, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The mechanisms underpinning concussion, traumatic brain injury, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and the relationships between these disorders, are poorly understood. We examined post-mortem brains from teenage athletes in the acute-subacute period after mild closed-head impact injury and found astrocytosis, myelinated axonopathy, microvascular injury, perivascular neuroinflammation, and phosphorylated tau protein pathology. To investigate causal mechanisms, we developed a mouse model of lateral closed-head impact injury that uses momentum transfer to induce traumatic head acceleration. Unanaesthetized mice subjected to unilateral impact exhibited abrupt onset, transient course, and rapid resolution of a concussion-like syndrome characterized by altered arousal, contralateral hemiparesis, truncal ataxia, locomotor and balance impairments, and neurobehavioural deficits. Experimental impact injury was associated with axonopathy, blood-brain barrier disruption, astrocytosis, microgliosis (with activation of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells, TREM2), monocyte infiltration, and phosphorylated tauopathy in cerebral cortex ipsilateral and subjacent to impact. Phosphorylated tauopathy was detected in ipsilateral axons by 24 h, bilateral axons and soma by 2 weeks, and distant cortex bilaterally at 5.5 months post-injury. Impact pathologies co-localized with serum albumin extravasation in the brain that was diagnostically detectable in living mice by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These pathologies were also accompanied by early, persistent, and bilateral impairment in axonal conduction velocity in the hippocampus and defective long-term potentiation of synaptic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex, brain regions distant from acute brain injury. Surprisingly, acute neurobehavioural deficits at the time of injury did not correlate with blood-brain barrier disruption, microgliosis, neuroinflammation, phosphorylated tauopathy, or electrophysiological dysfunction. Furthermore, concussion-like deficits were observed after impact injury, but not after blast exposure under experimental conditions matched for head kinematics. Computational modelling showed that impact injury generated focal point loading on the head and seven-fold greater peak shear stress in the brain compared to blast exposure. Moreover, intracerebral shear stress peaked before onset of gross head motion. By comparison, blast induced distributed force loading on the head and diffuse, lower magnitude shear stress in the brain. We conclude that force loading mechanics at the time of injury shape acute neurobehavioural responses, structural brain damage, and neuropathological sequelae triggered by neurotrauma. These results indicate that closed-head impact injuries, independent of concussive signs, can induce traumatic brain injury as well as early pathologies and functional sequelae associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy. These results also shed light on the origins of concussion and relationship to traumatic brain injury and its aftermath.awx350media15713427811001.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/brain/awx350

  2 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29452106
[Au] Autor:Sánchez-Migallón MC; Valiente-Soriano FJ; Salinas-Navarro M; Nadal-Nicolás FM; Jiménez-López M; Vidal-Sanz M; Agudo-Barriuso M
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Oftalmología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Murcia e Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria-VIRGEN DE LA ARRIXACA (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Nerve fibre layer degeneration and retinal ganglion cell loss long term after optic nerve crush or transection in adult mice.
[So] Source:Exp Eye Res;170:40-50, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0007
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We have investigated the long term effects of two different models of unilateral optic nerve (ON) lesion on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, in the injured and contralateral retinas of adult albino mice. Intact animals were used as controls. The left ON was intraorbitally crushed or transected at 0.5 mm from the optic disk and both retinas were analyzed at 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, 30, 45 or 90 days after injury. RGCs were immunoidentified with anti-Brn3a, and their axons with anti-highly phosphorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H (pNFH). After both lesions, RGC death in the injured retinas is first significant at day 3, and progresses quickly up to 7 days slowing down till 90 days. In the same retinas, the anatomical loss of RGC axons is not evident until day 30. However, by two days after both lesions there are changes in the expression pattern of pNFH: axonal beads, axonal club- or bulb-like formations, and pNFH RGC somas. The number of pNFH RGC somata peak at day 5 after either lesion and is significantly higher than in intact retinas at all time points. pNFH RGC somata are distributed across the retina, in accordance with the pattern of RGC death which is diffuse and homogenous. In the contralateral retinas there is no RGC loss, but there are few pNFH RGCs from day 2 to day 90. In conclusion, in albino mice, axotomy-induced RGC death precedes the loss of their intraretinal axons and occurs in two phases, a rapid and a slower, but steady, one. Injured retinas show similar changes in the pattern of pNFH expression and a comparable course of RGC loss.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29219268
[Au] Autor:Li W
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Security Technology, Railway Police College, Zhengzhou 450053, China.
[Ti] Title:[Application of Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in the Identification of Hemorrhagic Diffuse Axonal Injury].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;33(4):376-379, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To explore the application value of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in the forensic identification of hemorrhagic diffuse axonal injury (DAI). METHODS: The forensic identification materials of 20 DAI cases were analyzed retrospectively. The sequence image materials of T1WI, T2WI, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: DAI related hemorrhage focus commonly located in the superficial area of brain. The detection rate of hemorrhage focus by SWI was the highest, which showing significant difference ( <0.05) compared with other sequence images. CONCLUSIONS: The SWI plays an important role in the forensic identification of DAI.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2017.04.009

  4 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29219262
[Au] Autor:Chen Q; Bai J; Zhang WF
[Ad] Address:Forensic Medical Examination Center of Beijing Public Security Bureau, Beijing 100192, China.
[Ti] Title:[Screening of Differential Expression Proteins in Rat Brain Tissues after DAI by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;33(4):348-352, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To screen for the differential expression proteins in brain tissues of SD rat after diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification-liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer (iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS), and to explore potential biomarkers available for the diagnosis of DAI. METHODS: Animal models of DAI were established with the Marmarou method as reference, and the subjects were divided into blank control group ( =4), sham strike group ( =4) and fatal strike group ( =4), respectively. The proteins in rat brain tissues were detected by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS, and bioinformatics analysis and verification were performed on the results and screened for the differential expression proteins. RESULTS: A total of 2 016 proteins were identified and quantified. The bioinformatics analysis revealed that the proteins had wide distribution and function, and participated in different biological processes. There were 16 proteins showed differential expression in fatal strike group, including one up-regulated expression protein and 15 down-regulated expression proteins. The results of iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS were confirmed by Western blotting method. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple differential expression proteins in rat brain tissues after DAI can be screened by iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS. This not only indicates a research direction for exploring the pathogenesis of DAI, but also provides potential biomarkers available for the diagnosis of DAI.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2017.04.003

  5 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29188662
[Au] Autor:Ren GH; Weng RH; Shi Y; Huang P; Deng KF; Liu NG; Chen YJ
[Ad] Address:Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Shanghai Forensic Service Platform, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, P.R.China, Shanghai 200063, China.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Distribution in the Rat Brains with DAI by MALDI-TOF-IMS].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;32(4):241-244, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To establish the imaging mass spectrometry for analysis of differentially expressed proteins distribution in the rat brains with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) based on matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-IMS). METHODS: MALDI-TOF-IMS scanning were conducted on the brains of DAI group and control group in the range of 1 000 to 20 000 using AutoflexⅢ MALDI-TOF spectrometer. ClinProTool 2.2 software was used for statistical analysis on the data of two groups, and then the differentially expressed proteins were picked out to conduct imaging. The distribution of the proteins with different in the rat brains was observed. RESULTS: Five proteins with different , including 4 963, 5 634, 6 253, 6 714 and 7 532, differentially expressed in the rat brains with DAI. CONCLUSIONS: MALDI-TOF-IMS can be used for studying the differentially expressed proteins in rat brains with DAI and the analysis method is established for exploring the distribution of differentially expressed proteins in the rat brains with DAI using imaging mass spectrometry.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain/metabolism
Diffuse Axonal Injury/metabolism
Proteins/metabolism
Proteome/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Brain/pathology
Diffuse Axonal Injury/pathology
Proteomics
Rats
Software
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Proteins); 0 (Proteome)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2016.04.001

  6 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29462087
[Au] Autor:Humble SS; Wilson LD; Wang L; Long DA; Smith MA; Siktberg JC; Mirhoseini MF; Bhatia A; Pruthi S; Day MA; Muehlschlegel S; Patel MB
[Ad] Address:Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, Departments of Surgery and Neurosurgery, Section of Surgical Sciences, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt Center for Health Services Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.
[Ti] Title:Prognosis of Diffuse Axonal Injury with Traumatic Brain Injury.
[So] Source:J Trauma Acute Care Surg;, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:2163-0763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Determine the prognostic impact of MRI-defined DAI after TBI on functional outcomes, quality of life, and 3-year mortality. METHODS: This retrospective single center cohort included adult trauma patients (age>17y) admitted from 2006-2012 with TBI. Inclusion criteria were positive head CT with brain MRI within 2 weeks of admission. Exclusion criteria included penetrating TBI or prior neurologic condition. Separate ordinal logistic models assessed DAI's prognostic value for following scores: 1)hospital-discharge Functional Independence Measure (FIM); 2)long-term Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE); and 3)long-term Quality of Life after Brain Injury-Overall Scale (QOLIBRI-OS). Cox proportional hazards modeling assessed DAI's prognostic value for 3-year survival. Covariates included age, sex, race, insurance status, Injury Severity Score (ISS), admission Glasgow Coma Scale Score, Marshall Head CT Class, clinical DAI on MRI (Y/N), research-level anatomic DAI Grades I-III (I:cortical, II:corpus callosum, III:brainstem), ventilator days, time to follow commands, and time to long-term follow up (for logistic models). RESULTS: Eligibility criteria was met by 311 patients, who had a median age=40y (IQR:23-57), ISS=29 (IQR:22-38), ICU stay=6d (IQR:2-11), and follow-up=5y (IQR:3-6y). Clinical DAI was present on 47% of MRIs. Among 300 readable MRIs, 56% of MRIs had anatomic DAI (25% Grade I, 18% Grade II, 13% Grade III). On regression, only clinical (not anatomic) DAI was predictive of a lower FIM score (OR=2.5 [95% CI:1.28-4.76], P=0.007). Neither clinical nor anatomic DAI were related to survival, GOSE, or QOLIBRI scores. CONCLUSIONS: In this longitudinal cohort, clinical evidence of DAI on MRI may only be useful for predicting short-term in-hospital functional outcome. Given no association of DAI and long-term TBI outcomes, providers should be cautious in attributing DAI to future neurologic function, quality of life, and/or survival. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III STUDY TYPE: Retrospective cohort study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000001852

  7 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29463632
[Au] Autor:Chuang HY; Kung LC; Huang MY
[Ad] Address:Emergency Department, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:An injured man with acute altered mental status.
[So] Source:Emerg Med J;35(3):148, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1472-0213
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CLINICAL INTRODUCTION: A 58-year-old man sustained injuries due to accidental fall from a height of 5 m onto a solid floor while operating a crane. He was fully conscious without external evidence of head injury when presented to the ED. The patient had multiple fractures involving the fourth, fifth and seventh of the left ribs, left iliac wing and superior ramus of the pelvis, comminuted fracture of the left femur shaft, and an open fracture of the mandible. Two hours after ED presentation, the patient developed acute confusion and lethargy, which rapidly progressed to coma and respiratory distress, and was subsequently intubated with mechanical ventilation support. Emergent CT scan of the head is shown (figure 1).emermed;35/3/148/F1F1F1Figure 1CT scan of the head without contrast. QUESTION: What is the most likely diagnosis?A. Cerebral haemorrhageB. Brain metastasisC. Cerebral fat embolismD. Diffuse axonal injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1136/emermed-2017-206724

  8 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29460006
[Au] Autor:Johnson VE; Weber MT; Xiao R; Cullen DK; Meaney DF; Stewart W; Smith DH
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Penn Center for Brain Injury and Repair, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 105 Hayden Hall, 3320 Smith Walk, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
[Ti] Title:Mechanical disruption of the blood-brain barrier following experimental concussion.
[So] Source:Acta Neuropathol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0533
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although concussion is now recognized as a major health issue, its non-lethal nature has limited characterization of the underlying pathophysiology. In particular, potential neuropathological changes have typically been inferred from non-invasive techniques or post-mortem examinations of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we used a swine model of head rotational acceleration based on human concussion to examine blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity after injury in association with diffuse axonal injury and glial responses. We then determined the potential clinical relevance of the swine concussion findings through comparisons with pathological changes in human severe TBI, where post-mortem examinations are possible. At 6-72 h post-injury in swine, we observed multifocal disruption of the BBB, demonstrated by extravasation of serum proteins, fibrinogen and immunoglobulin-G, in the absence of hemorrhage or other focal pathology. BBB disruption was observed in a stereotyped distribution consistent with biomechanical insult. Specifically, extravasated serum proteins were frequently observed at interfaces between regions of tissue with differing material properties, including the gray-white boundary, periventricular and subpial regions. In addition, there was substantial overlap of BBB disruption with regions of axonal pathology in the white matter. Acute perivascular cellular uptake of blood-borne proteins was observed to be prominent in astrocytes (GFAP-positive) and neurons (MAP-2-positive), but not microglia (IBA1-positive). Parallel examination of human severe TBI revealed similar patterns of serum extravasation and glial uptake of serum proteins, but to a much greater extent than in the swine model, attributed to the higher injury severity. These data suggest that BBB disruption represents a new and important pathological feature of concussion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00401-018-1824-0

  9 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29203228
[Au] Autor:Powell MA; Black RT; Smith TL; Reeves TM; Phillips LL
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA 23298, United States. Electronic address: powellma3@vcu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Mild Fluid Percussion Injury Induces Diffuse Axonal Damage and Reactive Synaptic Plasticity in the Mouse Olfactory Bulb.
[So] Source:Neuroscience;371:106-118, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7544
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite the regenerative capacity of the olfactory bulb (OB), head trauma causes olfactory disturbances in up to 30% of patients. While models of olfactory nerve transection, olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) ablation, or direct OB impact have been used to examine OB recovery, these models are severe and not ideal for study of OB synaptic repair. We posited that a mild fluid percussion brain injury (mFPI), delivered over mid-dorsal cortex, would produce diffuse OB deafferentation without confounding pathology. Wild type FVB/NJ mice were subjected to mFPI and OB probed for ORN axon degeneration and onset of reactive synaptogenesis. OB extracts revealed 3 d postinjury elevation of calpain-cleaved 150-kDa αII-spectrin, an indicator of axon damage, in tandem with reduced olfactory marker protein (OMP), a protein specific to intact ORN axons. Moreover, mFPI also produced a 3-d peak in GFAP+ astrocyte and IBA1+ microglial reactivity, consistent with postinjury inflammation. OB glomeruli showed disorganized ORN axons, presynaptic degeneration, and glial phagocytosis at 3 and 7 d postinjury, all indicative of deafferentation. At 21 d after mFPI, normal synaptic structure re-emerged along with OMP recovery, supporting ORN afferent reinnervation. Robust 21 d postinjury upregulation of GAP-43 was consistent with the time course of ORN axon sprouting and synapse regeneration reported after more severe olfactory insult. Together, these findings define a cycle of synaptic degeneration and recovery at a site remote to non-contusive brain injury. We show that mFPI models diffuse ORN axon damage, useful for the study of time-dependent reactive synaptogenesis in the deafferented OB.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 1684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29381396
[Au] Autor:van Eijck MM; Schoonman GG; van der Naalt J; de Vries J; Roks G
[Ad] Address:a Department of Neurology , Elisabeth-TweeSteden Hospital , Tilburg , The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Diffuse axonal injury after traumatic brain injury is a prognostic factor for functional outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Brain Inj;32(4):395-402, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1362-301X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognosis of adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). METHODS: Online search (PubMed, Embase and Ovid Science Direct) of articles providing information about outcome in (1) patients with DAI in general, (2) DAI vs. non-DAI, (3) related to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification and (4) related to lesion location/load. A reference check and quality assessment were performed. RESULTS: A total of 32 articles were included. TBI patients with DAI had a favourable outcome in 62%. The risk of unfavourable outcome in TBI with DAI was three times higher than in TBI without DAI. Odds ratio (OR) for unfavourable outcome was 2.9 per increase of DAI grade on MRI. Lesions located in the corpus callosum were associated with an unfavourable outcome. Other specific lesion locations and lesions count showed inconsistent results regarding outcome. Lesion volume was predictive for outcome only on apparent diffusion coefficient and fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI sequences. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of DAI on MRI in patients with TBI results in a higher chance of unfavourable outcome. With MRI grading, OR for unfavourable outcome increases threefold with every grade. Lesions in the corpus callosum in particular are associated with an unfavourable outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/02699052.2018.1429018


page 1 of 169 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information