Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Disorders and of and Excessive and Somnolence [Words]
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[PMID]: 28449905
[Au] Autor:Xu X; Wu H; Zhuang J; Chen K; Huang B; Zhao Z; Zhao Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University of PLA, Shanghai, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Sleep-wake patterns, non-rapid eye movement, and rapid eye movement sleep cycles in teenage narcolepsy.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:47-56, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To further characterize sleep disorders associated with narcolepsy, we assessed the sleep-wake patterns, rapid eye movement (REM), and non-REM (NREM) sleep cycles in Chinese teenagers with narcolepsy. METHODS: A total of 14 Chinese type 1 narcoleptic patients (13.4 ± 2.6 years of age) and 14 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects (13.6 ± 1.8 years of age) were recruited. Ambulatory 24-h polysomnography was recorded for two days, with test subjects adapting to the instruments on day one and the study data collection performed on day two. RESULTS: Compared with the controls, the narcoleptic patients showed a 1.5-fold increase in total sleep time over 24 h, characterized by enhanced slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. Frequent sleep-wake transitions were identified in nocturnal sleep with all sleep stages switching to wakefulness, with more awakenings and time spent in wakefulness after sleep onset. Despite eight cases of narcolepsy with sleep onset REM periods at night, the mean duration of NREM-REM sleep cycle episode and the ratio of REM/NREM sleep between patients and controls were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Our study identified hypersomnia in teenage narcolepsy despite excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep fragmentation extended to all sleep stages, indicating impaired sleep-wake cycles and instability of sleep stages. The limited effects on NREM-REM sleep cycles suggest the relative conservation of ultradian regulation of sleep.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Narcolepsy/diagnosis
Narcolepsy/physiopathology
Sleep Stages/physiology
Sleep, REM/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
China/epidemiology
Circadian Rhythm/physiology
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/complications
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Narcolepsy/epidemiology
Polysomnography/methods
Sleep Deprivation/diagnosis
Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology
Ultradian Rhythm/physiology
Wakefulness/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28449903
[Au] Autor:Suzuki Y; Khoury S; El-Khatib H; Chauny JM; Paquet J; Giguère JF; Denis R; Gosselin N; Lavigne GJ; Arbour C
[Ad] Address:Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Faculty of Dental Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Individuals with pain need more sleep in the early stage of mild traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:36-42, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Hypersomnia is frequently reported after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), but its cause(s) remain elusive. This study examined sleep/wake activity after mTBI and its association with pain, a comorbidity often associated with insomnia. METHODS: Actigraphy recording was performed for 7 ± 2 consecutive days in 56 individuals at one month post-mTBI (64% male; 38 ± 12 years), 24 individuals at one year post-mTBI (58% male; 44 ± 11years), and in 20 controls (50% male; 37 ± 12 years). Pain intensity and its effect on quality of life was assessed with a visual analogue scale and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) bodily pain subscale. RESULTS: Overall, few differences in sleep/wake patterns were found between mTBI patients and controls. However, higher percentages of mTBI individuals with moderate-to-severe pain were found to require more than eight hours of sleep per day (37% vs11%; p = 0.04) and to be frequent nappers (defined as those who took three or more naps per week) (42% vs 22%; p = 0.04) compared to those with mild or no pain at one month postinjury. Correcting for age and depression, The SF-36 score was found to be a significant predictor of sleep duration exceeding eight hours per day at one month (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval = 0.92-0.99; p = 0.01), but not at one year post-mTBI. Pain and increased sleep need (in terms of hours per day or napping frequency) were found to co-exist in as much as 29% of mTBI patients at one month postinjury. CONCLUSION: Pain could be associated with more pronounced sleep need in about one-third of mTBI patients during early recovery. Unalleviated pain, found in more than 60% of mTBI patients, should therefore be looked for in all mTBI patients reporting new onset of sleep disorder, not only in those with insomnia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Concussion/complications
Brain Injuries/complications
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/complications
Pain/complications
Sleep Wake Disorders/complications
Sleep/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Actigraphy/methods
Adult
Brain Concussion/epidemiology
Brain Concussion/physiopathology
Brain Injuries/epidemiology
Comorbidity
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain/epidemiology
Pain/physiopathology
Pain/psychology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications
Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28449902
[Au] Autor:Janssen KC; Phillipson S; O'Connor J; Johns MW
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Education, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: kitty.janssen@monash.edu.
[Ti] Title:Validation of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale for Children and Adolescents using Rasch analysis.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:30-35, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: A validated measure of daytime sleepiness for adolescents is needed to better explore emerging relationships between sleepiness and the mental and physical health of adolescents. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) is a widely used scale for daytime sleepiness in adults but contains references to alcohol and driving. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale for Children and Adolescents (ESS-CHAD) has been proposed as the official modified version of the ESS for children and adolescents. This study describes the psychometric analysis of the ESS-CHAD as a measure of daytime sleepiness for adolescents. METHODS: The ESS-CHAD was completed by 297 adolescents, 12-18 years old, from two independent schools in Victoria, Australia. Exploratory factor analysis and Rasch analysis was conducted to determine the validity of the scale. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis and Rasch analysis indicated that ESS-CHAD has internal validity and a unidimensional structure with good model fit. Rasch analysis of four subgroups based on gender and year-level were consistent with the overall results. The results were consistent with published ESS results, which strongly indicates that the changes to the scale do not affect the scale's capacity to measure daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that the ESS-CHAD is a reliable and internally valid measure of daytime sleepiness in adolescents 12-18 years old. Further studies are needed to establish the internal validity of the ESS-CHAD for children under 12 years, and to establish external validity and accurate cut-off points for children and adolescents.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/diagnosis
Sleep Stages/physiology
Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Australia/epidemiology
Child
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics/methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28449900
[Au] Autor:Matsui K; Sasai-Sakuma T; Ishigooka J; Inoue Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; Japan Somnology Center, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Insufficient sleep rather than the apnea-hypopnea index can be associated with sleepiness-related driving problems of Japanese obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients residing in metropolitan areas.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:19-22, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and insufficient sleep might increase the risk of drowsy driving and sleepiness-related vehicular accidents. This study retrospectively investigated the factors associated with these driving problems, particularly addressing OSAS severity and sleep amounts of affected drivers. METHODS: This study examined 161 patients (146 male and 15 female) with OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 5) who drove on a routine basis and who completed study questionnaires. To investigate factors associated with drowsy driving during the prior year and sleepiness-related vehicular accidents or near-miss events during the prior five years, logistic regression analyses were performed with age, body mass index, monthly driving distance, habitual sleep duration on weekdays, the Japanese version of Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, AHI, and periodic limb movement index as independent variables. RESULTS: Of the patients, 68 (42.2%) reported drowsy driving experiences, and 86 (53.4%) reported sleepiness-related vehicular accidents or near-miss events. Analyses revealed the following: older age (46-65 years, ≥66 years) was negatively associated with drowsy driving (p <0.05, p <0.05), and habitually shorter sleep duration on weekdays (≤6 hours) was positively associated with drowsy driving (p <0.01). Habitual sleep duration of ≤6 hours (p <0.01) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of ≥11 (p <0.01) were positively associated with sleepiness-related vehicular accidents and near-miss events. However, AHI was not associated with these driving problems. CONCLUSION: Insufficient sleep, rather than severity of OSAS, was associated with sleepiness-related driving problems in these Japanese OSAS patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data
Automobile Driving/statistics & numerical data
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/complications
Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology
Sleep Stages/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control
Adult
Aged
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/classification
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/physiopathology
Female
Humans
Japan/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Polysomnography/methods
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology
Sleep Deprivation/complications
Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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Trombetta, Ivani C
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[PMID]: 29298404
[Au] Autor:Pedrosa RP; Maki-Nunes C; Midlej-Brito T; Lopes HF; Freitas LS; Trombetta IC; Toschi-Dias E; Alves MJNN; Fraga RF; Rondon MU; Negrão CE; Bortolotto LA; Lorenzi-Filho G; Drager LF
[Ad] Address:1 Sleep and Heart Laboratory, Pronto Socorro Cardiológico de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco , Pernambuco, Brazil .
[Ti] Title:Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Consecutive Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.
[So] Source:Metab Syndr Relat Disord;16(1):2-5, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8518
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and may contribute to metabolic deregulation, inflammation, and atherosclerosis in these patients. In clinical practice, however, OSA is frequently underdiagnosed. We sought to investigate the clinical predictors of OSA in patients with MetS. METHODS: We studied consecutive patients newly diagnosed with MetS (Adult Treatment Panel-III). All participants underwent clinical evaluation, standard polysomnography, and laboratory measurements. We performed a logistic regression model, including the following variables: gender, age >50 years, neck and waist circumferences, hypertension, diabetes, body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m , high risk for OSA by Berlin questionnaire, presence of excessive daytime somnolence (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), abnormal serum glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. RESULTS: We studied 197 patients (60% men; age: 49 ± 10 years; BMI: 32.9 ± 5.1 kg/m ). OSA (defined by an apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 events per hour) was diagnosed in 117 patients [59%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 52-66]. In multivariate analysis, male gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.28; 95% CI: 1.68-6.41; P < 0.01], abnormal glucose levels (OR: 3.01; 95% CI: 1.50-6.03; P < 0.01), excessive daytime sleepiness (OR: 2.38; 95% CI: 1.13-5.04; P = 0.02), and high risk for OSA by Berlin questionnaire (OR: 4.33; 95% CI: 2.06-9.11; P < 0.001) were independently associated with OSA. CONCLUSIONS: Simple clinical and metabolic characteristics may help to improve the underdiagnosis of OSA in patients with MetS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1089/met.2017.0112

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[PMID]: 27779432
[Au] Autor:Sharma VK; Gupta V; Pathak M; Ramam M
[Ad] Address:a Department of Dermatology and Venereology , All India Institute of Medical Sciences , New Delhi , India.
[Ti] Title:An open-label prospective clinical study to assess the efficacy of increasing levocetirizine dose up to four times in chronic spontaneous urticaria not controlled with standard dose.
[So] Source:J Dermatolog Treat;28(6):539-543, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1471-1753
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The EAACI/GA LEN/EDF/WAO recommendation of increasing antihistamines' dose up to four times in urticaria not adequately controlled with the standard dose is largely based on expert opinion. The objective of this study is to test the current urticaria guidelines of up-dosing antihistamines as second-line treatment. METHODS: This was an open-label study conducted prospectively on 113 patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. All patients were treated with sequentially increasing doses of levocetrizine (5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day) every week till the patients became completely asymptomatic or dose of 20 mg/day reached. Urticaria Activity Score (UAS)-7, urticaria-related quality-of-life (CU-Q2oL) and patients' global assessment were used to assess treatment response. RESULTS: Twenty-one (18.58%) patients became asymptomatic with levocetirizine 5 mg/day, while 50 required higher doses of levocetirizine for complete control: 29/92 (31.52%), 6/63 (9.52%) and 15/57 (26.31%) with 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day, respectively. The percentage of patients experiencing >75% improvement increased with increasing doses of levocetirizine: 26.54%, 53.98%, 60.17% and 69.91% with 5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg and 20 mg/day, respectively. Sequential up-dosing of levocetirizine produced a progressive improvement in both urticaria control (UAS-7) and quality-of-life (CU-Q2oL) without significantly increasing somnolence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the current recommendations of increasing antihistamines up to four times the standard dose in patients who fail the first-line treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cetirizine/therapeutic use
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating/therapeutic use
Urticaria/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cetirizine/adverse effects
Chronic Disease
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/etiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating/adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Urticaria/pathology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating); 6U5EA9RT2O (levocetirizine); YO7261ME24 (Cetirizine)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/09546634.2016.1246705

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[PMID]: 28926325
[Au] Autor:Ferreira C; Ferreira H; Vieira MJ; Costeira M; Branco L; Dias Â; Macedo L
[Ad] Address:Serviço de Pediatria. Hospital da Senhora da Oliveira. Guimarães. Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiologia do Uso de Internet numa População Adolescente e Sua Relação com Hábitos de Sono. [Epidemiology of Internet Use by an Adolescent Population and its Relation with Sleep Habits].
[So] Source:Acta Med Port;30(7-8):524-533, 2017 Aug 31.
[Is] ISSN:1646-0758
[Cp] Country of publication:Portugal
[La] Language:por
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In the last decades, the great technological development increased Internet popularity, emerging the concern about its overuse. The objectives of this study were to assess and characterize Internet use in adolescence, determine Internet addiction and clarify its association with sleep disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: It was performed an observational, cross sectional and community-based study. The target were students attending 7th and 8th grades, to whom was applied an online self-report questionnaire to assess sociodemographic features, Internet use, Internet dependence, sleep characteristics and excessive daytime sleepiness. RESULTS: A total of 727 adolescents were included with a mean age 13 ± 0.9 years. Three-quarters of teenagers use Internet daily and 41% do it for three or more hours/day, mainly at home. The phone and laptop were the main devices used. Online games and social networks use were the main activities performed. Internet dependence was observed in 19% of adolescents, and it was associated with male gender, social networks use, mainly Twitter and Instagram use, self-perceived sleep problems, initial and middle insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: The results confirm the highlight that Internet has in adolescents routine, who prioritize in their use access to social networks and online games, using single devices, less subject to parental control. CONCLUSION: The Internet addiction rate observed and its association with sleep alterations and daytime sleepiness emphasizes the importance of this issue.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.20344/amp.8205

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[PMID]: 28847794
[Au] Autor:Suzuki K; Okuma Y; Uchiyama T; Miyamoto M; Sakakibara R; Shimo Y; Hattori N; Kuwabara S; Yamamoto T; Kaji Y; Hirano S; Kadowaki T; Hirata K; Kanto NMPD investigators
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University, Tochigi, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Impact of sleep-related symptoms on clinical motor subtypes and disability in Parkinson's disease: a multicentre cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry;88(11):953-959, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1468-330X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of sleep disturbances on Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical motor subtypes and disease-related disability in a multicentre setting. METHODS: We report a cross-sectional relationship between sleep-related symptoms and clinical motor subtypes (tremor dominant (TD); intermediate; postural instability and gait disturbances (PIGDs)) identified in a multicentre study, including 436 patients with PD and 401 age-matched controls. PD-related sleep problems (PD-SP), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and probable REM sleep behaviour disorder (pRBD) were evaluated using the PD sleep scale (PDSS)-2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and RBD screening questionnaire-Japanese version (RBDSQ-J), respectively. RESULTS: PD-SP (PDSS-2 ≥18; 35.1% vs 7.0%), EDS (ESS ≥10; 37.8% vs 15.5%) and pRBD (RBDSQ-J ≥5; 35.1% vs 7.7%) were more common in patients with PD than in controls. The prevalence of restless legs syndrome did not differ between patients with PD and controls (3.4% vs 2.7%). After adjusting for age, sex, disease duration and Movement Disorder Society-Unified PD Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) part III score, the PIGD group had higher PDSS-2 and ESS scores than the TD group. The RBDSQ-J scores did not differ among the TD, intermediate and PIGD groups. A stepwise regression model predicting the MDS-UPDRS part II score identified the Hoehn and Yahr stage, followed by the number of sleep-related symptoms (PD-SP, EDS and pRBD), disease duration, MDS-UPDRS part III score, PIGD subtype, depression and MDS-UPDRS part IV score as significant predictors. CONCLUSION: Our study found a significant relationship between sleep disturbances and clinical motor subtypes. An increased number of sleep-related symptoms had an impact on disease-related disability.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disability Evaluation
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/classification
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/diagnosis
Parkinson Disease/classification
Parkinson Disease/diagnosis
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder/classification
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination
Parkinson Disease/epidemiology
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder/epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171114
[Lr] Last revision date:171114
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170830
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2017-316136

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[PMID]: 28735923
[Au] Autor:Arosemena Coronel M; Sánchez Armijos J; Tettamanti Miranda D; Vásquez Cedeño D; Mariani Carrera R; Navarro Chávez M; Castillo PR
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Luis Vernaza Hospital, Ecuador.
[Ti] Title:Excessive daytime somnolence is associated with hypoglycemia in adult Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;36:6-9, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the frequency of sleep disorders in hypoglycemic diabetic patients and possible relationships with scores of sleep disorders and restless legs syndrome in mestizo population in Guayaquil, Ecuador. METHODS: A multicenter, cross-sectional study conducted at an outpatient endocrinology clinic in urban and rural Ecuador regions, included 290 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus with severe hypoglycemic episodes, completed, validated, and culturally adapted sleep questionnaires to assess daytime sleepiness, risk of sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with severe hypoglycemia. RESULTS: The prevalence of EDS was 56.8%, RLS prevalence of 46.2%, and 38.6% prevalence of high risk Berlin score. Multivariate logistic regression indicated hypoglycemic T2DM in the range of 56-75 years old were more likely to have high ESS (p 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of sleep disorders in diabetic Latinos living in Ecuador was evidenced. The presence of somnolence in patients older than 56 years and high HbA1c levels should alert the clinician for the occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170724
[Lr] Last revision date:170724
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 3248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28726523
[Au] Autor:de Biase S; Nilo A; Gigli GL; Valente M
[Ad] Address:a Neurology Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences , University of Udine Medical School , Udine , Italy.
[Ti] Title:Investigational therapies for the treatment of narcolepsy.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Investig Drugs;26(8):953-963, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7658
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by a pentad of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and disturbed nocturnal sleep. While non-pharmacological treatments are sometimes helpful, more than 90% of narcoleptic patients require a pharmacological treatment. Areas covered: The present review is based on an extensive Internet and PubMed search from 1994 to 2017. It is focused on drugs currently in development for the treatment of narcolepsy. Expert opinion: Currently there is no cure for narcolepsy, with treatment focusing on symptoms control. However, these symptomatic treatments are often unsatisfactory. The research is leading to a better understanding of narcolepsy and its symptoms. New classes of compounds with possible applications in the development of novel stimulant/anticataplectic medications are described. H3 receptor antagonists represent a new therapeutic option for EDS in narcolepsy. JZP-110, with its distinct mechanism of action, would be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of EDS in the coming years. In the future, hypocretin-based therapies and immune-based therapies, could modify the clinical course of the disease. However, more information would be necessary to completely understand the autoimmune process and also how this process can be altered for therapeutic benefits.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drug Design
Drugs, Investigational/therapeutic use
Narcolepsy/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/drug therapy
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/physiopathology
Drugs, Investigational/pharmacology
Histamine H3 Antagonists/pharmacology
Histamine H3 Antagonists/therapeutic use
Humans
Narcolepsy/physiopathology
Orexins/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Drugs, Investigational); 0 (Histamine H3 Antagonists); 0 (Orexins)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170807
[Lr] Last revision date:170807
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170721
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13543784.2017.1356819


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