Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Drowning [Words]
References found : 4956 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 496 go to page                         

  1 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29096679
[Au] Autor:Ali Ali B; Lefering R; Fortun Moral M; Belzunegui Otano T
[Ad] Address:Department of Accident and Emergency, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Health Service of Navarra - Osasunbidea, Calle Monasterio de Urdax 47, 4°D, 31011, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. bismilnawazish@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiological comparison between the Navarra Major Trauma Registry and the German Trauma Registry (TR-DGU®).
[So] Source:Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med;25(1):107, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1757-7241
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: International benchmarking can help identify trauma system performance issues and determine the extent to which other countries also experience these. When problems are identified, countries can look to high performers for insight into possible responses. The objective of this study was to compare the treatment and outcome of severely injured patients in Germany and Navarra, Spain. METHODS: Data collected, from 2010 to 2013, in the Navarra Major Trauma Registry (NMTR) and the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) were compared. Both registries followed the Utstein Trauma Template (European Core Dataset) for documentation of trauma patients. Adult patients (≥ 16 years) with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) being >15 points were included in this study. Patients who had been admitted to the hospital later than 24 h after the trauma, had been pronounced dead before hospital arrival, or had been injured by hanging, drowning or burns, were excluded. Demographic data, injury data, prehospital data, hospital treatment data, time intervals, and outcome were compared. The expected mortality was calculated using the Revised Injury Severity Classification score II (RISC II). RESULTS: A total of 646 and 43,110 patients were included in the outcome analysis from NMTR and TR-DGU, respectively. The difference between observed and expected mortality was -0.4% (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] 0.97; 95% CI 0.93-1.04) in Germany and 1.6% (SMR 1.08; 95% CI: 1.02-1.14) in Navarra. Differences in the characteristics of trauma patients and trauma systems between the regions were noted. CONCLUSION: The higher observed mortality in Navarra is consistent with the epidemiological characteristics of its population. However, to improve the quality of trauma care in the Navarra trauma system, certain improvements are necessary. There were less young adults with severe injuries in Navarra than in Germany. It is possible to compare data of severely injured patients from different countries if standardized registries are used.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13049-017-0453-2

  2 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29095168
[Au] Autor:Sakai K; Saito K; Takada A; Hikiji W; Kikuchi Y; Fukunaga T
[Ad] Address:From the *Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office, Tokyo Metropolitan Government, Tokyo; †Department of Legal Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine, Tochigi; ‡Department of Forensic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama; and §Department of Forensic Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Deaths Associated With Brotizolam Poisoning From a Single Drug Overdose: Four Reported Cases.
[So] Source:Am J Forensic Med Pathol;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1533-404X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brotizolam is a short-acting hypnotic in the benzodiazepine family, and fatal poisonings by an overdose of brotizolam are rare. This report describes 4 cases of deaths associated with brotizolam poisoning from a single drug overdose. The ages ranged from 51 to 90 years, and the postmortem interval between death and tissue sampling was 1.5 to 2.5 days. These deaths were classified as 1 homicide and 3 suicides. The concentration of the brotizolam ranged from 0.05 to 0.21 mg/L in the blood samples. Ethanol, which could cause mild alcohol intoxication, was detected in the blood samples from 2 cases. Postmortem examinations did not find any significant pathologic conditions, except for a case of death by drowning in a bathtub due to brotizolam poisoning. These 4 cases suggest that a brotizolam overdose should not be underestimated in terms of its fatal effects, particularly when situations involve alcohol intoxication, injury subsequent to the poisoning, or underlying medical conditions including aging.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PAF.0000000000000358

  3 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28558673
[Au] Autor:Zhu Y; Feng X; Li H; Huang Y; Chen J; Xu G
[Ad] Address:Institute of Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Ningbo Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 237, Yongfeng Road, Haishu District, Ningbo City, 315010, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a geo-specific poster compared to a general poster for effecting change in perceived threat and intention to avoid drowning 'hotspots' among children of migrant workers: evidence from Ningbo, China.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;17(1):530, 2017 May 30.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Drowning among children of migrant workers is a major, though neglected public health issue in China. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial was used to examine the potential impact of viewing a preventive health poster with/without geo-located drowning events on perceptions of drowning risk among Chinese migrant children. A total of 752 children from three schools in Jiangbei district were selected by multi-stage sampling and randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 380) or control (n = 372). Multilevel models were used to analyse changes in responses to the following questions after viewing the assigned poster for 10 min: (1) "Do you believe that drowning is a serious health problem in Ningbo city?"; (2) "Do you believe that there are lots of drowning-risk waters around you?"; (3) "Do you believe that the likelihood of your accessing a drowning-risk water is great?"; and (4) "Would you intend to avoid accessing to those drowning-risk waters when being exposed?" RESULTS: At baseline there were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups in perceptions of drowning risk or covariates. Following the intervention, participants that viewed the geo-specific poster were more likely to respond more favourably to the first three questions (p < 0.001) than those who viewed the standard poster. However, there was no substantive difference between the geo-specific or standard poster in terms of changing intentions to avoid drowning hotspots (p = 0.214). CONCLUSIONS: Use of 'geo-located' information added value to the effectiveness of a drowning prevention poster for enhancing awareness of drowning hotspots among children of migrant workers. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-IOR-16008979 (Retrospectively registered) (The date of trial registration: Aug 5, 2016, the date of enrolment of the first participant: Nov 10, 2015).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drowning/prevention & control
Posters as Topic
Transients and Migrants
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Awareness
Child
China
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Perception
Risk
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170531
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4462-x

  4 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28209580
[Au] Autor:Ishaque M; Manning JH; Woolsey MD; Franklin CG; Salinas FS; Fox PT
[Ad] Address:From the Research Imaging Institute (M.I., M.D.W., C.G.F., F.S.S., P.T.F.) Ishaque@livemail.uthscsa.edu Fox@uthscsa.edu.
[Ti] Title:White Matter Tract Pathology in Pediatric Anoxic Brain Injury from Drowning.
[So] Source:AJNR Am J Neuroradiol;38(4):814-819, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1936-959X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although drowning is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in young children, the neuropathologic consequences have not been fully determined. The purpose of this article was to quantitatively characterize white matter microstructural abnormalities in pediatric anoxic brain injury from nonfatal drowning and investigate the correlation with motor function. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Whole-brain T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR imaging datasets were acquired in 11 children with chronic anoxic brain injury and 11 age- and sex-matched neurotypical controls (4-12 years of age). A systematic evaluation form and scoring system were created to assess motor function. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics was used to quantify between-group alterations in the diffusion tensor imaging indices of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity and to correlate with per-subject functional motor scores. RESULTS: Group-wise Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analyses demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule and the splenium of the corpus callosum ( < .001). Mean diffusivity was more diffusely increased, affecting the bilateral superior corona radiata, anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, and external capsules ( < .001). Individual-subject fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values derived from the ROIs of the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule strongly correlated with motor scores and demonstrated more potent between-group effects than with ROIs of the entire corticospinal tract. CONCLUSIONS: These data particularly implicate the deep white matter, predominantly the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, as targets of damage in pediatric anoxic brain injury with drowning. The substantial involvement of motor-system tracts with relative sparing elsewhere is notable. These results localize white matter pathology and inform future diagnostic and prognostic markers.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drowning/diagnostic imaging
Hypoxia, Brain/diagnostic imaging
White Matter/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anisotropy
Brain/diagnostic imaging
Child
Child, Preschool
Corpus Callosum/diagnostic imaging
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Efferent Pathways/diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Internal Capsule/diagnostic imaging
Male
Movement
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3174/ajnr.A5097

  5 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29087137
[Au] Autor:Gatica CI; Dri J; Cortesi V; Miranda D; Ubeda C; Waisman I
[Ad] Address:Comité Nacional de Prevención de Lesiones, Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, Argentina. gatica.molina@yahoo.com.ar.
[Ti] Title:Opiniones, prácticas y conocimientos de pediatras sobre la prevención de lesiones no intencionales. [Pediatricians' opinions, practices and knowledge about unintentional injuries prevention].
[So] Source:Arch Argent Pediatr;115(6):601-607, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1668-3501
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to address the pediatrician's opinions, practices and knowledge on the prevention of unintentional injuries. DESIGN: descriptive and analytical study by anonymous and self-administered survey to pediatricians, in Mendoza, in 2015. RESULTS: N: 210. The mean age of pediatricians was 44.55 years old, 65.2% were women. 200 (95.22%) performed injury prevention, 76% did it in most of the visits, using verbal method mainly. 198 (94.29%) believed that prevention improves home safety and 185 (88.1%) should be done in all consultations. There were 79.6% correct answers among pediatricians less than 10 years` seniority (N= 84) about child car restraint system, drowning, baby walker use and falls; among the oldest (N= 126) there were 61.9% of correct answers (p= 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Pediatricians are aware of their role in injury prevention, realized prevention activities and knew about the subject, especially the younger ones.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5546/aap.2017.601

  6 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28833689
[Au] Autor:Tipton MJ; Collier N; Massey H; Corbett J; Harper M
[Ad] Address:Extreme Environments Laboratory, Department of Sport & Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK.
[Ti] Title:Cold water immersion: kill or cure?
[So] Source:Exp Physiol;102(11):1335-1355, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-445X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:NEW FINDINGS: What is the topic of this review? This is the first review to look across the broad field of 'cold water immersion' and to determine the threats and benefits associated with it as both a hazard and a treatment. What advances does it highlight? The level of evidence supporting each of the areas reviewed is assessed. Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation-related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1113/EP086283

  7 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28012128
[Au] Autor:Osculati A; Visonà SD; Re L; Sozzi M; Castelli F; Andrello L; Vignali C
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Unit of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences "Antonio Fornari", University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Death of a seven-month-old child in a washing machine: a case report.
[So] Source:Int J Legal Med;131(3):719-722, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1437-1596
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The authors present a case which brings out a unique modality of child homicide by placing the baby in a washing machine and turning it on. The murder was perpetrated by the baby's mother, who suffered from a serious depressive disorder. A postmortem RX and then a forensic autopsy were performed, followed by histologic examinations and toxicology. On the basis of the results of the autopsy, as well as the histology and the negative toxicological data, the cause of death was identified as acute asphyxia. This diagnosis was rendered in light of the absence of other causes of death, as well as the presence of typical signs of asphyxia, such as epicardial and pleural petechiae and, above all, the microscopic examinations, which pointed out a massive acute pulmonary emphysema. Regarding the cause of the asphyxia, at least two mechanisms can be identified: drowning and smothering. In addition, the histology of the brain revealed some findings that can be regarded as a consequence of the barotrauma due to the centrifugal force applied by the rotating drum of the washing machine. Another remarkable aspect is that we are dealing with a mentally-ill assailant. In fact, the baby's mother, after a psychiatric examination, was confirmed to be suffering from a mental illness-a severe depressive disorder-and so she was adjudicated not-guilty-by-reason-of-insanity. This case warrants attention because of its uniqueness and complexity and, above all, its usefulness in the understanding of the pathophysiology of this particular manner of death.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asphyxia/pathology
Homicide
Household Articles
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Asphyxia/etiology
Barotrauma/etiology
Barotrauma/pathology
Centrifugation
Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Insanity Defense
Mothers/psychology
Pulmonary Emphysema/pathology
Purpura/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00414-016-1521-2

  8 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29071453
[Au] Autor:Vijayakumar NP; Parikh P; Mian SI; Tennant B; Grossman GH; Albrecht B; Niziol LM; Woodward MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, W.K. Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan Medical School, 1000 Wall Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA.
[Ti] Title:Donor cornea tissue in cases of drowning or water submersion: eye banks practice patterns and tissue outcomes.
[So] Source:Cell Tissue Bank;, 2017 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6814
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Surgical use of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion (drowning or submersion secondary to death) remains controversial due to limited evidence about the quality of these tissues. To assess the safety of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion, an investigation of eye banks' practice patterns and tissue outcomes was conducted. All 79 Eye Bank Association of America accredited eye banks were contacted for a phone interview of practices regarding tissue from victims of water submersion. A retrospective review of corneal tissues from 2014 to 2016 from a large eye bank network was performed to identify all donors submerged in water. Corneal epithelial integrity, endothelial cell density (ECD), rim cultures, and adverse events were analyzed for associations with water submersion characteristics. 49 eye banks (62% response) participated in the survey. 55% of these eye banks had specific, written protocol for tissue eligibility from donors submerged in water. With or without specific protocol, eye banks reported considering water type (84%) and length of time submerged (92%) to determine eligibility. 22% of eye banks reported medical director involvement when eligibility determination was unclear. 79 tissues from 40 donors who were submerged were identified in 2014-2016 eye bank data. No donor tissues had pre-processing corneal infiltrates, positive rim cultures, or adverse events post-keratoplasty. Corneal epithelial integrity and ECD were not associated with water type or length of time submerged. In conclusion, data from a large eye bank network showed no adverse events or outcomes, indicating these tissues may be safe.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10561-017-9671-0

  9 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29068811
[Au] Autor:Byard RW
[Ad] Address:From the School of Medicine, the University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Forensic Features of Clothing-Related Deaths: Historical and Cultural Aspects.
[So] Source:Am J Forensic Med Pathol;, 2017 Oct 24.
[Is] ISSN:1533-404X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Clothing may both cause death and contribute to ongoing lethal mechanisms by a variety of quite disparate mechanisms. The manner of death may be accidental, suicidal, or homicidal. Accidental deaths include burning from clothing catching on fire, strangulation from clothing tangling in vehicle wheels or exposed machinery, and drowning. Entanglement of clothing in machinery may also result in significant injuries, which are not uncommon in farming communities. Excessive clothing, or its absence, may significantly alter body temperature, and hanging from clothing is a feature in the young or in mentally or physically handicapped adults, or in adults who are intoxicated with alcohol or drugs. In previous years, potentially lethal amounts of arsenic were present in clothing and accessories from dyes. Clothing may also be used to form nooses or to pad ropes in suicides and may be used in cases of strangulation, suffocation, or choking in homicides. The contribution of clothing to mortality has changed over the years with changes in fashions and in manufacturing techniques. Geographical differences in clothing-related deaths persist because of variable social and cultural practices and legislative frameworks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PAF.0000000000000352

  10 / 4956 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29067975
[Au] Autor:Duble SN; Thomas SV
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences & Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, India.
[Ti] Title:Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.
[So] Source:Indian J Med Res;145(6):738-745, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0971-5916
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:People with epilepsy have increased risk of premature death, and their life expectancy may reduce by 2-10 yr. Population- and hospital-based studies have shown that the excess mortality in epilepsy is not entirely explained by deaths directly attributable to epilepsy such as accidents and drowning during a seizure. It is also significantly contributed by deaths from other causes such as cardiac deaths, deaths due to malignancies and other causes. It had recently been recognized that sudden unexpected deaths in epilepsy (SUDEP) contributed to a small yet important proportion of mortality in epilepsy. SUDEPs are deaths (witnessed or unwitnessed) unrelated to trauma, drowning or status epilepticus and not attributable to any specific medical conditions. Several factors related to epilepsy and drug therapy have been found to be associated with higher risk of SUDEP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_548_17


page 1 of 496 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information