Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Echovirus and Infections [Words]
References found : 6004 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29323107
[Au] Autor:Zhu R; Cheng T; Yin Z; Liu D; Xu L; Li Y; Wang W; Liu J; Que Y; Ye X; Tang Q; Zhao Q; Ge S; He S; Xia N
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics, School of Life Sciences, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361102, China.
[Ti] Title:Serological survey of neutralizing antibodies to eight major enteroviruses among healthy population.
[So] Source:Emerg Microbes Infect;7(1):2, 2018 Jan 10.
[Is] ISSN:2222-1751
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human enteroviruses (EVs) are the most common causative agents infecting human, causing many harmful diseases, such as hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), herpangina (HA), myocarditis, encephalitis, and aseptic meningitis. EV-related diseases pose a serious worldwide threat to public health. To gain comprehensive insight into the seroepidemiology of major prevalent EVs in humans, we firstly performed a serological survey for neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71), Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16), Coxsackie virus A6 (CV-A6), Coxsackie virus A10 (CV-A10), Coxsackie virus B3 (CV-B3), Coxsackie virus B5 (CV-B5), Echovirus 25 (ECHO25), and Echovirus 30 (ECHO30) among the healthy population in Xiamen City in 2016, using micro-neutralization assay. A total of 515 subjects aged 5 months to 83 years were recruited by stratified random sampling. Most major human EVs are widely circulated in Xiamen City and usually infect infants and children. The overall seroprevalence of these eight EVs were ranged from 14.4% to 42.7%, and most of them increased with age and subsequently reached a plateau. The co-existence of nAbs against various EVs are common among people ≥ 7 years of age, due to the alternate infections or co-infections with different serotypes of EVs, while most children were negative for nAb against EVs, especially those < 1 year of age. This is the first report detailing the seroepidemiology of eight prevalent EVs in the same population, which provides scientific data supporting further studies on the improvement of EV-related disease prevention and control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41426-017-0003-z

  2 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29211672
[Au] Autor:Stevens DL; Bryant AE
[Ad] Address:From the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Boise, ID; and the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.
[Ti] Title:Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;377(23):2253-2265, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Debridement
Fasciitis, Necrotizing
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects
Biomarkers/blood
Biopsy
C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Critical Illness
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/diagnosis
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/etiology
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/pathology
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/therapy
Gas Gangrene
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use
Soft Tissue Infections
Streptococcal Infections/chemically induced
Streptococcus pyogenes
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMra1600673

  3 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29339251
[Au] Autor:Carta A; Sanna G; Briguglio I; Madeddu S; Vitale G; Piras S; Corona P; Peana AT; Laurini E; Fermeglia M; Pricl S; Serra A; Carta E; Loddo R; Giliberti G
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Via Muroni 23, 07100 Sassari, Italy. Electronic address: acarta@uniss.it.
[Ti] Title:Quinoxaline derivatives as new inhibitors of coxsackievirus B5.
[So] Source:Eur J Med Chem;145:559-569, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3254
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enteroviruses are among the most common and important human pathogens for which there are no specific antiviral agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration so far. Particularly, coxsackievirus infections have a worldwide distribution and can cause many important diseases. We here report the synthesis of new 14 quinoxaline derivatives and the evaluation of their cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against representatives of ssRNA, dsRNA and dsDNA viruses. Promisingly, three compounds showed a very potent and selective antiviral activity against coxsackievirus B5, with EC in the sub-micromolar range (0.3-0.06 µM). A combination of experimental techniques (i.e. virucidal activity, time of drug addition and adsorption assays) and in silico modeling studies were further performed, aiming to understand the mode of action of the most active, selective and not cytotoxic compound, the ethyl 4-[(2,3-dimethoxyquinoxalin-6-yl)methylthio]benzoate (6).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiviral Agents/pharmacology
Enterovirus B, Human/drug effects
Quinoxalines/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis
Antiviral Agents/chemistry
Cattle
Cell Line
Cell Survival/drug effects
Cricetinae
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Haplorhini
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Models, Molecular
Molecular Structure
Quinoxalines/chemical synthesis
Quinoxalines/chemistry
Structure-Activity Relationship
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Quinoxalines)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27774610
[Au] Autor:Lee S; Kim HW; Kim KH
[Ad] Address:Center for Vaccine Evaluation and Study, Medical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Functional antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type B, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae contained in intravenous immunoglobulin products.
[So] Source:Transfusion;57(1):157-165, 2017 01.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) replacement therapy is used to prevent invasive infections in patients with primary antibody deficiency (PAD). However, few studies have functionally evaluated specific antibodies against encapsulated bacteria that cause invasive infection in patients with PAD. In this study, functional antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci), and Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) in IVIG therapy were evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen lots of IVIG products prepared by two Korean manufacturers (Products A and B) were evaluated. The functional antibodies were measured by serum bactericidal assay for Hib and four meningococcal serogroups and by multiplexed opsonophagocytic assay for 26 pneumococcal serotypes. The estimated trough levels of antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus were calculated to determine whether the usual IVIG dose is appropriate for protecting patients with PAD. RESULTS: The functional antibody levels for Hib were similar in all of the IVIG products. In contrast, serum bacterial indices of meningococcal serogroups A and Y showed significant differences between products A and B. Opsonic indices to pneumococci varied depending on the serotype in each IVIG product. The estimated trough levels of antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus exceeded the protective levels in most of the IVIG products except for the antibodies against two pneumococcal serotypes. CONCLUSION: Most of the tested commercial IVIG products had sufficient functional antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus to protect patients with PAD receiving IVIG treatment. Regular and continuous evaluation of IVIG products is necessary to maintain an optimal therapeutic effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology
Haemophilus influenzae type b/immunology
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/immunology
Neisseria meningitidis/immunology
Streptococcus pneumoniae/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Republic of Korea
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.13869

  5 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367530
[Au] Autor:Nariai R; Kobayashi T; Masuda H; Ono H; Imadome KI; Kubota M; Ito S; Ishiguro A
[Ad] Address:National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Postgraduate Education and Training.
[Ti] Title:[Transient detection of lupus anticoagulant in acute phase of Kawasaki disease].
[So] Source:Nihon Rinsho Meneki Gakkai Kaishi;40(6):456-459, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7413
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:  In Kawasaki disease (KD), endothelial damage and an elevation in coagulant factors provoke thrombosis. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) is strongly associated with the risk of thrombosis in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome; however, there has been no report of positive LA in KD patients. A previously healthy, 2-year-old boy was admitted due to fever, bilateral conjunctivitis, redness of the lips, and unilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Typical Kawasaki disease was diagnosed on day 5 of illness. Adenovirus antigens were detected in his stool. After the KD symptoms were successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, his activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) increased to 88 seconds at eight days of illness. The cross-mixing test showed an inhibition pattern, and the presence of LA was proved using diluted Russell's viper venom time. APPT elongation improved due to continued low dose aspirin therapy without thromboembolisms. The possibility of contamination by LA was low because six other patients treated with the same immunoglobulin lot showed no APTT elongation. We speculated that KD-related infections led to the presence of LA, which may have triggered the thrombosis. Further accumulation of data is warranted to elucidate the role of LA in KD patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute-Phase Reaction/blood
Acute-Phase Reaction/diagnosis
Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/blood
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/blood
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute-Phase Reaction/drug therapy
Aspirin/administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage
Male
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Thrombosis/etiology
Thrombosis/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous); 0 (Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor); R16CO5Y76E (Aspirin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2177/jsci.40.456

  6 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29410201
[Au] Autor:Ahlbrecht J; Hillebrand LK; Schwenkenbecher P; Ganzenmueller T; Heim A; Wurster U; Stangel M; Sühs KW; Skripuletz T
[Ad] Address:Clinical Neuroimmunology and Neurochemistry, Department of Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: ahlbrecht.jonas@mh-hannover.de.
[Ti] Title:Cerebrospinal fluid features in adults with enteroviral nervous system infection.
[So] Source:Int J Infect Dis;68:94-101, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3511
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of adults with nervous system infections caused by enteroviruses, with special emphasis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). METHODS: The data of 46 patients who were PCR-positive for enteroviruses in the CSF between 2002 and 2017 were evaluated. RESULTS: Meningitis was the most common clinical manifestation (89%), followed by encephalitis (7%) and isolated cranial nerve involvement (4%). Twenty percent of patients reported a sudden onset of severe headache that led to the initial suspected diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage. General signs of infection, such as fever, elevated C-reactive protein, and an elevated white blood cell count, were found in only 61%. Most patients exhibited consistent inflammatory CSF changes, with elevated cell counts (85%) and blood-CSF barrier dysfunction (83%). Patients with normal CSF cell counts were significantly older, less frequently presented with meningitis, and exhibited lower peripheral white blood cell counts. Sequencing revealed species Enterovirus B in all patients, with most sequences related to echovirus 30. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of CSF pleocytosis, isolated cranial nerve involvement, and only infrequent general signs of infection may impede the diagnosis of enteroviral nervous system infections. A thorough CSF analysis including PCR is essential for a reliable diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27773751
[Au] Autor:Pinkert S; Dieringer B; Diedrich S; Zeichhardt H; Kurreck J; Fechner H
[Ad] Address:Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Biotechnology, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: sandra.pinkert@tu-berlin.de.
[Ti] Title:Soluble coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (sCAR-Fc); a highly efficient compound against laboratory and clinical strains of coxsackie-B-virus.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;136:1-8, 2016 12.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coxsackie-B-viruses (CVB) cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild syndromes to life-threatening conditions such as pancreatitis, myocarditis, meningitis and encephalitis. Especially newborns and young infants develop severe diseases and long-term sequelae may occur among survivors. Due to lack of specific antiviral therapy the current treatment of CVB infection is limited to symptomatic treatment. Here we analyzed the antiviral activity of a soluble receptor fusion protein, containing the extracellular part of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) fused to the constant domain of the human IgG - sCAR-Fc - against laboratory and clinical CVB strains. We found a high overall antiviral activity of sCAR-Fc against various prototypic laboratory strains of CVB, with an inhibition of viral replication up to 3 orders of magnitude (99.9%) at a concentration of 2.5 µg/ml. These include isolates that are not dependent on CAR for infection and isolates that are resistant against pleconaril, the currently most promising anti-CVB therapeutic. A complete inhibition was observed using higher concentration of sCAR-Fc. Further analysis of 23 clinical CVB isolates revealed overall high antiviral efficiency (up to 99.99%) of sCAR-Fc. In accordance with previous data, our results confirm the strong antiviral activity of sCAR-Fc against laboratory CVB strains and demonstrate for the first time that sCAR-Fc is also highly efficient at neutralizing clinical CVB isolates. Importantly, during the sCAR-Fc inhibition experiments, no naturally occurring resistant mutants were observed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiviral Agents/pharmacology
Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein/chemistry
Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein/pharmacology
Enterovirus B, Human/drug effects
Immunoglobulin G/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein/genetics
Coxsackievirus Infections/drug therapy
Coxsackievirus Infections/virology
HeLa Cells
Humans
Immunoglobulin G/pharmacology
Receptors, IgG
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology
Solubility
Virus Replication/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Receptors, IgG); 0 (Recombinant Fusion Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161107
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29220410
[Au] Autor:Qiu Y; Ye X; Zhang HM; Hanson P; Zhao G; Tong L; Xie R; Yang D
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Cleavage of osmosensitive transcriptional factor NFAT5 by Coxsackieviral protease 2A promotes viral replication.
[So] Source:PLoS Pathog;13(12):e1006744, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7374
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5)/Tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor induced by hypertonic stress in the kidney. However, the function of NFAT5 in other organs has rarely been studied, even though it is ubiquitously expressed. Indeed, although NFAT5 was reported to be critical for heart development and function, its role in infectious heart diseases has remained obscure. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanism by which NFAT5 interferes with infection of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a major cause of viral myocarditis. Our initial results demonstrated that although the mRNA level of NFAT5 remained constant during CVB3 infection, NFAT5 protein level decreased because the protein was cleaved. Bioinformatic prediction and verification of the predicted site by site-directed mutagenesis experiments determined that the NFAT5 protein was cleaved by CVB3 protease 2A at Glycine 503. Such cleavage led to the inactivation of NFAT5, and the 70-kDa N-terminal cleavage product (p70-NFAT5) exerted a dominant negative effect on the full-length NFAT5 protein. We further showed that elevated expression of NFAT5 to counteract viral protease cleavage, especially overexpression of a non-cleavable mutant of NFAT5, significantly inhibited CVB3 replication. Ectopic expression of NFAT5 resulted in elevated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a factor reported to inhibit CVB3 replication. The necessity of iNOS for the anti-CVB3 effect of NFAT5 was supported by the observation that inhibition of iNOS blocked the anti-CVB3 effect of NFAT5. In a murine model of viral myocarditis, we observed that treatment with hypertonic saline or mannitol solution upregulated NFAT5 and iNOS expression, inhibited CVB3 replication and reduced tissue damage in the heart. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the anti-CVB3 activity of NFAT5 is impaired during CVB3 infection due to 2A-mediated cleavage of NFAT5. Thus induction of NFAT5 by hypertonic agents may be a promising strategy for the development of anti-CVB3 therapeutics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coxsackievirus Infections/virology
Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism
Enterovirus B, Human/enzymology
Myocarditis/virology
Myocytes, Cardiac/virology
Transcription Factors/metabolism
Viral Proteins/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Substitution
Animals
Cell Line
Coxsackievirus Infections/immunology
Coxsackievirus Infections/metabolism
Coxsackievirus Infections/pathology
Enterovirus B, Human/immunology
Enterovirus B, Human/physiology
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Male
Mice, Inbred A
Mutation
Myocarditis/immunology
Myocarditis/metabolism
Myocarditis/pathology
Myocytes, Cardiac/immunology
Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism
Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/antagonists & inhibitors
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/chemistry
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/genetics
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism
Peptide Fragments/chemistry
Peptide Fragments/genetics
Peptide Fragments/metabolism
Proteolysis
RNA Interference
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism
Substrate Specificity
Transcription Factors/antagonists & inhibitors
Transcription Factors/chemistry
Transcription Factors/genetics
Virus Replication
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (NFAT5 protein, human); 0 (Nfat5 protein, mouse); 0 (Peptide Fragments); 0 (Recombinant Fusion Proteins); 0 (Transcription Factors); 0 (Viral Proteins); EC 1.14.13.39 (NOS2 protein, human); EC 1.14.13.39 (Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II); EC 3.4.22.- (Cysteine Endopeptidases); EC 3.4.22.29 (picornain 2A, Picornavirus)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180109
[Lr] Last revision date:180109
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1006744

  9 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28792686
[Au] Autor:Dixon SB; Lane A; O'Brien MM; Burns KC; Mangino JL; Breese EH; Absalon MJ; Perentesis JP; Phillips CL
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
[Ti] Title:Viral surveillance using PCR during treatment of AML and ALL.
[So] Source:Pediatr Blood Cancer;65(1), 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1545-5017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: While viral surveillance of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus using PCR is routine in patients undergoing hematopoetic stem cell transplant and solid organ transplant, the utility in the nontransplant pediatric leukemia population is unknown. Our institution screens patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for viral DNAemia by PCR as part of clinical care. PROCEDURE: This retrospective chart review included patients treated for newly diagnosed or relapsed AML or ALL between April 2010 and September 2014. We retrieved data for viral PCR screening, detection and quantification, duration of positivity, and prophylaxis or treatment. RESULTS: One hundred eleven patients were included in analyses. Forty (36.0%) had at least one blood PCR positive for EBV, CMV, or adenovirus. Patients with ALL had significantly higher rates of persistent viral detection and treatment than those with AML (P < 0.02, P < 0.01, respectively). International patients had significantly higher rates of viral detection (P < 0.01), persistence (P < 0.01), any treatment (P < 0.03), and antiviral treatment (P < 0.01); 16.9% of patients who received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) prophylactically had viral detection compared to 63% of patients who did not receive prophylactic IVIG (P = 0.0008). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ALL were more susceptible than those with AML to viral reactivation that was persistent or resulted in treatment. Patients with relapsed ALL, refractory ALL, or infantile ALL are most likely to benefit from asymptomatic screening for CMV and adenovirus. International patients are at higher risk for reactivation and may merit screening. EBV reactivation was not significant and does not warrant screening.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: DNA Virus Infections/blood
DNA Viruses
DNA, Viral/blood
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute
Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA Virus Infections/prevention & control
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/blood
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/virology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Viral); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171129
[Lr] Last revision date:171129
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170810
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/pbc.26752

  10 / 6004 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29179969
[Au] Autor:Del Carmen Martínez S; Gervás Ríos R; Franco Rodríguez Y; González Velasco C; Cruz Sánchez MÁ; Abad Hernández MDM
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Complejo Asistencial de Salamanca, Salamanca, España. Electronic address: sofia_delcarmen@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Detección de virus herpes y enterovirus humanos mediante arrays de baja densidad en muestras de anatomía patológica. [Detection of herpes virus and human enterovirus in pathology samples using low-density arrays].
[So] Source:Rev Esp Patol;50(1):8-14, 2017 Jan - Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1988-561X
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Despite the frequency of infections with herpesviridae family, only eight subtypes affect humans (Herpex Simplex Virus types 1 and 2, Varicella Zoster Virus, Epstein-Barr Virus, Citomegalovirus and Human Herpes Virus types 6, 7 and 8). Amongst enteroviruses infections, the most important are Poliovirus, Coxackievirus and Echovirus. Symptoms can vary from mild to severe and early diagnosis is of upmost importance. Nowadays, low-density arrays can detect different types of viruses in a single assay using DNA extracted from biological samples. We analyzed 70 samples of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue, searching for viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, CMV, EBV, HHV-6, HHV-7 y HHV-8, Poliovirus, Echovirus and Coxsackievirus) using the kit CLART ENTHERPEX. Out of the total of 70 samples, 29 were positive for viral infection (41.43%), and only 4 of them showed cytopathic effect (100% correlation between histology and the test). 47.6% of GVHD samples were positive for virus; 68.75% of IBD analyzed showed positivity for viral infection; in colitis with ulcers (neither GVHD nor IBD), the test was positive in 50% of the samples and was also positive in 50% of ischemic lesions. The high sensitivity of the technique makes it a useful tool for the pathologist in addition to conventional histology-based diagnosis, as a viral infection may affect treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171128
[Lr] Last revision date:171128
[St] Status:In-Process


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