Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ecthyma [Words]
References found : 1202 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 121 go to page                         

  1 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
SciELO Chile full text

[PMID]: 29488558
[Au] Autor:Flores C; González E; Verna A; Peralta A; Madariaga C; Odeón A; Cantón G
[Ad] Address:Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Mayor, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Virus orf en humanos, confirmación molecular de un caso clínico en Chile. [Orf virus in human, confirmation in case report from Chile].
[So] Source:Rev Chilena Infectol;34(6):607-609, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0717-6341
[Cp] Country of publication:Chile
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Infection with the orf virus, also known as contagious ecthyma, is recognized as an occupational zoonosis worldwide. It is diagnosed by cutaneous lesions that progress rapidly from macules to papules, vesicles and pustules. The clinical case of a student of veterinary medicine who had had contact with goats, clinically healthy and without apparent lesions, which occured 19 days ago, is reported. She presented two vesicular lesions that coalesced to form a larger lesion surrounded by an erythematous halo. The lesions were compatible with the classical presentation of those produced by the orf virus in humans. The presence of the orf virus was confirmed by a nested PCR from biopsy tissue. It is one of the first cases confirmed by molecular techniques in humans in Chile.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29467004
[Au] Autor:Tryland M; Beckmen KB; Burek-Huntington KA; Breines EM; Klein J
[Ad] Address:Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, Arctic Infection Biology, UiT-Arctic University of Norway, Framstredet 39, 9019, Tromsø, Norway. morten.tryland@uit.no.
[Ti] Title:Orf virus infection in Alaskan mountain goats, Dall's sheep, muskoxen, caribou and Sitka black-tailed deer.
[So] Source:Acta Vet Scand;60(1):12, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1751-0147
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The zoonotic Orf virus (ORFV; genus Parapoxvirus, Poxviridae family) occurs worldwide and is transmitted between sheep and goats, wildlife and man. Archived tissue samples from 16 Alaskan wildlife cases, representing mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus, n = 8), Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli, n = 3), muskox (Ovibos moschatus, n = 3), Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis, n = 1) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti, n = 1), were analyzed. RESULTS: Clinical signs and pathology were most severe in mountain goats, affecting most mucocutaneous regions, including palpebrae, nares, lips, anus, prepuce or vulva, as well as coronary bands. The proliferative masses were solid and nodular, covered by dark friable crusts. For Dall's sheep lambs and juveniles, the gross lesions were similar to those of mountain goats, but not as extensive. The muskoxen displayed ulcerative lesions on the legs. The caribou had two ulcerative lesions on the upper lip, as well as lesions on the distal part of the legs, around the main and dew claws. A large hairless spherical mass, with the characteristics of a fibroma, was sampled from a Sitka black-tailed deer, which did not show proliferative lesions typical of an ORFV infection. Polymerase chain reaction analyses for B2L, GIF, vIL-10 and ATI demonstrated ORFV specific DNA in all cases. Sequences from Dall's sheep formed a separate cluster, comparable to ORFV from domestic sheep. Sequences from the other species were different from the Dall's sheep sequences, but almost identical to each other. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first major investigation of parapoxvirus infections in large Alaskan game species, and the first report of parapoxvirus infection in caribou and Sitka black-tailed deer. This study shows that most of the wild ruminant species in Alaska and from most parts of Alaska, can carry and be affected by ORFV. These findings call for attention to transmission of ORFV from wildlife to livestock and to hunters, subsistence harvesters, and wildlife biologists.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13028-018-0366-8

  3 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29371156
[Au] Autor:Khoo T; Ford F; Lobo Z; Psevdos G
[Ad] Address:Fellow in Infectious Diseases, Stony Brook University Hospital, NY.
[Ti] Title:One Thing after Another: Ecthyma Gangrenosum.
[So] Source:Am J Med;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1555-7162
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29418100
[Au] Autor:Sunderkötter C; Becker K; Kutzner H; Meyer T; Blödorn-Schlicht N; Reischl U; Nenoff P; Geißdörfer W; Gräser Y; Herrmann M; Kühn J; Bogdan C
[Ad] Address:Abteilung für translationale Dermatoinfektiologie, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster und Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie und Venerologie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg.
[Ti] Title:Molekulare Diagnostik von Hautinfektionen am Paraffinmaterial - Übersicht und interdisziplinärer Konsensus.
[So] Source:J Dtsch Dermatol Ges;16(2):139-148, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1610-0387
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nukleinsäure-Amplifikations-Techniken (NAT), wie die PCR, sind hochsensitiv sowie selektiv und stellen in der mikrobiologischen Diagnostik wertvolle Ergänzungen zur kulturellen Anzucht und Serologie dar. Sie bergen aber gerade bei formalinfixiertem und in Paraffin eingebettetem Gewebe ein Risiko für sowohl falsch negative als auch falsch positive Resultate, welches nicht immer richtig eingeschätzt wird. Daher haben Vertreter der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hygiene und Mikrobiologie (DGHM) und der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft (DDG) einen Konsensus in Form einer Übersichtsarbeit erarbeitet, wann eine NAT am Paraffinschnitt angezeigt und sinnvoll ist und welche Punkte dabei in der Präanalytik und Befundinterpretation beachtet werden müssen. Da bei Verdacht auf eine Infektion grundsätzlich Nativgewebe genutzt werden soll, ist die PCR am Paraffinschnitt ein Sonderfall, wenn beispielsweise bei erst nachträglichaufgekommenem Verdacht auf eine Infektion kein Nativmaterial zur Verfügung steht und nicht mehr gewonnen werden kann. Mögliche Indikationen sind der histologisch erhobene Verdacht auf eine Leishmaniose, eine Infektion durch Bartonellen oder Rickettsien, oder ein Ecthyma contagiosum. Nicht sinnvoll ist oder kritisch gesehen wird eine NAT am Paraffinschnitt zum Beispiel bei Infektionen mit Mykobakterien oder RNA-Viren. Die Konstellation für eine NAT aus Paraffingewebe sollte jeweils benannt werden, die erforderliche Prä-Analytik, die jeweiligen Grenzen des Verfahrens und die diagnostischen Alternativen bekannt sein. Der PCR-Befund sollte entsprechend kommentiert werden, um Fehleinschätzungen zu vermeiden.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ddg.13438_g

  5 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29418086
[Au] Autor:Sunderkötter C; Becker K; Kutzner H; Meyer T; Blödorn-Schlicht N; Reischl U; Nenoff P; Geißdörfer W; Gräser Y; Herrmann M; Kühn J; Bogdan C
[Ad] Address:Department of Translational Dermatoinfectiology, Westphalian Wilhelms University, Münster, Germany, and Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University Medical Center, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Molecular diagnosis of skin infections using paraffin-embedded tissue - review and interdisciplinary consensus.
[So] Source:J Dtsch Dermatol Ges;16(2):139-147, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1610-0387
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nucleic acid amplification techniques (NATs), such as PCR, are highly sensitive and specific methods that have become valuable supplements to culture and serology in the diagnosis of infectious disorders. However, especially when using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue, these techniques are associated with both false-negative and false-positive results, a pitfall that is frequently misjudged. Representatives of the German Society of Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) and the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) therefore set out to develop a consensus - in the form of a review article - on the appropriate indications for NATs using paraffin-embedded tissue, its contraindications, and the key points to be considered in the pre- and post-analytical phase. Given that fresh, naive tissue is preferably to be used in the workup of a suspected infection, PCR analysis on paraffin sections represents an exception. The latter may be considered if an infection is suspected at a later point in time and fresh tissue has not been preserved or can no longer be obtained. Potential indications include confirmation of histologically suspected infections with Leishmania spp., Bartonella spp., Rickettsia spp., or in case of ecthyma contagiosum. Infections with, for example, mycobacteria or RNA viruses, on the other hand, are not considered useful indications for NATs using paraffin sections. In order to avoid misinterpretation of test results, it is essential that laboratory reports on NATs using paraffin-embedded tissue contain information on the indication/diagnostic circumstances, the required and chosen pre-analytical steps, the limitations of the method, and on diagnostic alternatives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ddg.13438

  6 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28468200
[Au] Autor:Ata N; Gögüs HE; Kiliç S
[Ad] Address:*Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Gaziantep 25 Aralik State Hospital, Gaziantep †National Tularemia Reference Laboratory, Public Health Institution of Turkey, Ankara, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Giant Orf on the Nose.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;28(3):e234-e235, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Orf is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by parapoxvirus. Orf lesions are typically seen on the hand, but they have rarely been reported on the nose. Herein, the authors report a rare patient of an orf lesion on the nose of a 52-year-old man after the Muslim celebration of the feast of the sacrifice. The lesion spontaneously recovered 8 weeks after the initial appearance and showed no evidence of recurrence after 1 year of follow-up. Orf virus infections may occur more often after the celebration of the feast of the sacrifice in Muslim countries.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ecthyma, Contagious/diagnosis
Facial Dermatoses/pathology
Facial Dermatoses/virology
Nose Diseases/pathology
Nose Diseases/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ecthyma, Contagious/etiology
Ecthyma, Contagious/therapy
Facial Dermatoses/therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nose Diseases/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000003441

  7 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29335029
[Au] Autor:Tedla M; Gebreselassie M
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, The University of Gondar, P.O. Box: 196, Gondar, Ethiopia. mebvet2002@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Estimating the proportion of clinically diagnosed infectious and non-infectious animal diseases in Ganta Afeshum woreda, Eastern Tigray zone, Ethiopia.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;11(1):29, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study was performed with the objective of identifying the proportion of emerging and endemic livestock diseases using cross sectional survey. RESULT: A total of 285 clinically diseased animals were presented to a veterinary clinic and diagnosed tentatively based on history, clinical sign, and simple laboratory diagnostics and from the study, actinomycosis (15.83%), mastitis (15%), tick infestation (10%), respiratory diseases (9.16%) and gastro intestinal parasitism (9.16%) were confirmed with higher proportion in large animals. Pasteurollosis (38, 31%), contagious ecthyma (12, 10%), tick infestation (9, 0%), mite infestation (9, 10%), sheep and goat pox (9, 10%), and gastrointestinal parasitism (9, 17%) were frequently encountered diseases in sheep and goat respectively. In equids, back sore, epizootic lymphangitis and lameness accounted a proportion of 22.95, 21.31, and 13.11% respectively. In conclusion, result of the present study showed that the proportion of livestock disease is high, and it affects the socioeconomic status of the local community in the study area as a result of mortality and production loss.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13104-018-3158-3

  8 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29334948
[Au] Autor:Tedla M; Berhan N; Molla W; Temesgen W; Alemu S
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Gondar, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, P.O. Box: 196, Gondar, Ethiopia. mebvet2002@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Molecular identification and investigations of contagious ecthyma (Orf virus) in small ruminants, North west Ethiopia.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):13, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Orf virus, the prototype of parapoxvirus, is the main causative agent of contagious ecthyma. Little is known about the status of the disease in Ethiopia and this study was aimed at determining its status using PCR as a confirmatory tool. METHODS: a total of 400 randomly selected sheep and goat was screened for the identification of the virus using amplification of B2L gene and transfection of mammalian cells (VERO cells). RESULTS: Out of 400 animals screened for infection of the virus, 48 animals were found positive to PCR and revealed an overall incidence of 12%. Different epidemiological parameters were considered to look at the association with incidence of the disease and of which, only species of the animal(sheep), non-vaccinated and non-treated animals, nursing animals, poor body condition animals, extensively managed animals, animals having mouth lesion, and study areas having outbreak history showed higher prevalence. A univariate logistic regression analysis showed statistically significant difference in all variables (P < 0.05). Whereas, age and sex of animals showed no significant difference (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The result of the present finding showed high incidence of Orf virus in the region as confirmed through PCR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1339-x

  9 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29303728
[Au] Autor:Kromer C; Bierschenk C; Czerny CP; Schön MP; Buhl T
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Orf (ecthyma contagiosum) in a sheep and a shepherd.
[So] Source:Lancet Infect Dis;18(1):122, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4457
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180105
[Lr] Last revision date:180105
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 1202 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29211664
[Au] Autor:Korte AKM; Vos JM
[Ad] Address:Sint Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands ak.korte@antoniusziekenhuis.nl.
[Ti] Title:Ecthyma Gangrenosum.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;377(23):e32, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ecthyma/pathology
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/complications
Pseudomonas Infections/pathology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ecthyma/etiology
Ecthyma/microbiology
Female
Humans
Pseudomonas Infections/etiology
Skin/microbiology
Skin/pathology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171215
[Lr] Last revision date:171215
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMicm1702302


page 1 of 121 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information