Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ectropion [Words]
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  1 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348693
[Au] Autor:Kievit A; Tessadori F; Douben H; Jordens I; Maurice M; Hoogeboom J; Hennekam R; Nampoothiri S; Kayserili H; Castori M; Whiteford M; Motter C; Melver C; Cunningham M; Hing A; Kokitsu-Nakata NM; Vendramini-Pittoli S; Richieri-Costa A; Baas AF; Breugem CC; Duran K; Massink M; Derksen PWB; van IJcken WFJ; van Unen L; Santos-Simarro F; Lapunzina P; Gil-da Silva Lopes VL; Lustosa-Mendes E; Krall M; Slavotinek A; Martinez-Glez V; Bakkers J; van Gassen KLI; de Klein A; van den Boogaard MH; van Haaften G
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, 3015CN, The Netherlands. j.a.kievit@erasmusmc.nl.
[Ti] Title:Variants in members of the cadherin-catenin complex, CDH1 and CTNND1, cause blepharocheilodontic syndrome.
[So] Source:Eur J Hum Genet;26(2):210-219, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5438
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Blepharocheilodontic syndrome (BCDS) consists of lagophthalmia, ectropion of the lower eyelids, distichiasis, euryblepharon, cleft lip/palate and dental anomalies and has autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression. We identified heterozygous variants in two genes of the cadherin-catenin complex, CDH1, encoding E-cadherin, and CTNND1, encoding p120 catenin delta1 in 15 of 17 BCDS index patients, as was recently described in a different publication. CDH1 plays an essential role in epithelial cell adherence; CTNND1 binds to CDH1 and controls the stability of the complex. Functional experiments in zebrafish and human cells showed that the CDH1 variants impair the cell adhesion function of the cadherin-catenin complex in a dominant-negative manner. Variants in CDH1 have been linked to familial hereditary diffuse gastric cancer and invasive lobular breast cancer; however, no cases of gastric or breast cancer have been reported in our BCDS cases. Functional experiments reported here indicated the BCDS variants comprise a distinct class of CDH1 variants. Altogether, we identified the genetic cause of BCDS enabling DNA diagnostics and counseling, in addition we describe a novel class of dominant negative CDH1 variants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41431-017-0010-5

  2 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29508023
[Au] Autor:Asfar S
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 24923, 13110, Safat, Kuwait. sami@hsc.edu.kw.
[Ti] Title:Anoplasty for Post-hemorrhoidectomy Low Anal Stenosis: A New Technique.
[So] Source:World J Surg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Post-hemorrhoidectomy anal stenosis though rare is very disturbing and devastating complication. Many surgical procedures have been described, but despite good results, many complications can ensue like flap necrosis, mucosal ectropion, and restenosis. OBJECTIVE: We report a new simple technique for repair of severe/moderate anal stenosis which requires no extensive flap mobilization or many sutures. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: This is a personal series of 65 patients treated over a period of 20 years. The data were prospectively recorded by the author. The essence of this simple procedure is mobilizing the anal mucosa to the dentate line via a vertical incision and mobilizing the adjacent perianal skin and subcutaneous fat to allow a completely tension-free approximation of the perianal skin and the anal mucosa which are sutured together transversely. A tension-releasing incision is made in the perianal region which is left to heal by secondary intention. RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients (90.8%) continued the 5-year follow-up, and 6 patients left the country after 2 years of follow-up. There was only one case of recurrence after 2 years, which was treated by a second anoplasty. Four patients (59-66 years old) developed transient urine retention after surgery. One patient developed partial dehiscence of the suture line which was treated conservatively. No mucosal ectropion or perianal skin necrosis was observed. Complete healing of the perianal tension-releasing wound was within 2-3 months. By the third week after surgery, all the patients discontinued use of stool softeners or laxatives and were able to defecate comfortably. CONCLUSIONS: This procedure is simple and requires little dissection and only a few sutures with minimal complications. It is suitable for low severe and moderate anal stenosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00268-018-4561-6

  3 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506332
[Au] Autor:Azuma R; Aoki S; Aizawa T; Kuwabara M; Kiyosawa T
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic Surgery, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The vertical orbicularis oculi muscle turn-over procedure for the correction of paralytic ectropion of the lower eyelid.
[So] Source:Arch Plast Surg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:2234-6163
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Static reconstruction surgery that tightens the tension of the inferior tarsus, thereby raising the lax lower eyelid, is a common treatment for paralytic ectropion of the lower eyelid. We present one such operative procedure, in which an orbicularis oculi muscle flap was used. Methods: The surgical technique involves partial resection of the tarsus and the skin, as well as a superior-based orbicularis oculi muscle flap that is sutured to the firm tissue present on the Whitnall tubercle. The muscle flap is approximately 7 mm in width and 15 mm in length, with a superior pedicle that is attached to the tarsus at the medial point of the resected tarsus. The procedure results in contact between the ocular surface and the lower eyelid. Results: The procedure was performed in 11 patients with lower eyelid ectropion due to facial paralysis. Ten cases showed a favorable outcome following surgery, with stable results seen over an average follow-up period of 4.5 years. In one case, recurrence of ectropion was observed 2 months after surgery due to an insufficient correction, and the patient required repeat surgery. Conclusions: The orbicularis oculi muscle flap was an effective means of suspension and was able to maintain long-term traction tension. This procedure can therefore be considered a favorable treatment option for lower eyelid ectropion due to facial paralysis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.5999/aps.2017.01235

  4 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29227410
[Au] Autor:Komatsu K; Matsuda H; Takahashi Y; Nakano T
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Daisan Hospital, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo.
[Ti] Title:Recurrent Lower Eyelid Ectropion After Graft Surgery Using Autogenous Palmaris Longus Tendon.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;29(2):e195-e196, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 78-year-old male experienced right lower eyelid ectropion following right facial trauma from a fall 5 years ago, for which he underwent autogenous palmaris longus tendon graft surgery at another clinic. Recurrence was noted 3 years after surgery. On first examination, there was outward turning of the lateral half of the right lower eyelid margin. We performed a lateral tarsal strip procedure with removal of the graft. Intraoperatively, the lateral part of the graft was located along the inferior tarsal border, whereas the medial part was located on the tarsal surface. The lateral stump had bifurcated; 1 branch had passed through a bony hole drilled at the base of the rim; and both branches had been ligated together on the rim surface. The medial side had been fixed to the medial canthal tendon. Postoperatively, the apposition of eyelid and ocular surface was good, and the patient experienced no recurrence after 1 year.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004255

  5 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29384803
[Au] Autor:Mellado F; Fuentes I; Palisson F; I Vergara J; Kantor A
[Ad] Address:Cornea Department, Fundación Oftalmológica Los Andes, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Ophthalmologic Approach in Epidermolysis Bullosa: A Cross-Sectional Study With Phenotype-Genotype Correlations.
[So] Source:Cornea;37(4):442-447, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4798
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This study describes ophthalmologic and systemic clinical findings in different subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) establishing genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 58 patients with EB together with the Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Research Association, Chile. Data were stratified by major subtypes such as "simplex epidermolysis bullosa" (EBS), "junctional epidermolysis bullosa" (JEB), "recessive and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa" and "dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa" (DDEB), and "Kindler syndrome" (KS). The diagnosis was confirmed by skin immunofluorescence mapping and genetic testing. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal erosions, corneal scarring, symblepharon, blepharitis, ectropion, limbal stem cell deficiency, and esophageal involvement were assessed. Clinical outcome was based on the presence of corneal involvement attributable to EB. RESULTS: The most common ocular manifestations were corneal erosion/scarring and recurrent erosions. Frequencies of the EB subtypes were as follows: 17% EBS, 12% JEB, 16% DDEB, 53% recessive and DDEB, and 2% KS. Patients with EBS and DDEB did not reveal ocular involvement. Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) were most affected by the disease showing corneal involvement in 16 cases, whereas 2 patients with JEB and the single KS case also showed corneal disease. Before their visit, 24 patients had undergone esophageal dilation, 23 of them with RDEB and 1 with KS. CONCLUSIONS: Although ophthalmic complications are common in EB, the incidence varied with the EB subtype. We also establish the correlation between esophageal and corneal involvement in RDEB.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICO.0000000000001525

  6 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480654
[Au] Autor:Ramesh S; Gupta A; Rootman DB; Goldberg RA
[Ad] Address:Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California.
[Ti] Title:Long-Term Follow-Up of Lateral Canthal Resuspension.
[So] Source:Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila);, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:2162-0989
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the long-term results of lateral canthal resuspension over time. DESIGN: A cohort study of adults (n = 25, 45 eyelids) undergoing lateral canthal resuspension. METHODS: Marginal reflex distance 2 (MRD2), inferior scleral show, lateral canthal height, lateral canthal angle, horizontal palpebral aperture, and lateral scleral triangle area were measured preoperatively and at postoperative week 1, month 3, and the final follow-up visit. RESULTS: Minimum follow-up time was 6 months (mean, 15.1 months). At the final follow-up visit, MRD2 decreased by 0.41 ± 0.14 mm, inferior scleral show decreased by 0.27 ± 0.05 mm, and lateral canthal height increased by 0.81 ± 0.15 mm. The overall function of time was found to be significant for change in MRD2 (P < 0.01). In multiple comparisons, all time point values were significantly different from one another (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05), except for 3 months and the final position, which were not. Similarly, the overall effect of time on lateral canthus position was also significant (P < 0.01). All time points were significantly different from one another (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05). The overall effect of time on inferior scleral show was also significant (P < 0.01). Differences were significant from preoperative to final postoperative position, although the other time points were not significant (Bonferroni corrected, P < 0.05). No complications were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Minimally invasive lateral canthal resuspension provides durable, albeit modest, improvements in MRD2, inferior scleral show, and lateral canthal height without significantly changing lateral canthal angle, horizontal palpebral aperture, or lateral scleral triangle area.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.22608/APO.2017432

  7 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29398209
[Au] Autor:Barcic S; Blumer M; Essig H; Schumann P; Wiedemeier DB; Rücker M; Gander T
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of preseptal and retroseptal transconjunctival approaches in patients with isolated fractures of the orbital floor.
[So] Source:J Craniomaxillofac Surg;46(3):388-390, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4119
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Transconjunctival approach has become a standard procedure to access fractures of orbit and the infraorbital rim. The transconjunctival incision can be performed pre- or retroseptally. Both approaches have been described combined with modifications such as transcaruncular or detachment of the lateral canthus for wider exposure of the orbital walls and rim. Particularly concerning aesthetics, the transconjunctival approach shows advantages compared to the transcutaneous incisions, such as the transciliary and infraorbital access. Moreover, transconjunctival approach is preferred in the literature regarding lid retraction. In this study the preseptal approach is compared with the retroseptal approach concerning en- or ectropion, foreign body sensation and formation of symblepharon. In our collective complication rates were lower in the retroseptal transconjunctival group, although this was not statistically significant. Whether the preseptal or the retroseptal transconjunctival approach is selected, is rather based on the surgeon's preferences. Nevertheless, the retroseptal approach must be considered as advantageous alternative to the preseptal approach because of simpler surgical technique and the safer distance to the vulnerable lid apparatus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29463864
[Au] Autor:Vahdani K; Ford R; Garrott H; Thaller VT
[Ad] Address:Bristol Eye Hospital, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol, BS 1 2LX, UK. kaveh.vahdani@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Lateral tarsal strip versus Bick's procedure in correction of eyelid malposition.
[So] Source:Eye (Lond);, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5454
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To compare the functional and anatomical outcomes of lateral tarsal strip (LTS) with Bick's procedure in treatment of eyelid malposition. METHODS: A retrospective, consecutive case series of patients who underwent LTS and Bick's procedure for all types of involutional lower eyelid malposition, at two centers between January 2012 and 2015. Statistical analyses of differences between groups were performed using the Fisher's exact test to compare non-continuous variables and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables. RESULTS: A total of 641 procedures (557 LTS and 84 Bick's) were performed on 504 patients (137 bilateral) by 7 consultants and their trainees. The study cohort included 286 males and 218 females. The mean age was 76.2 years (median 78). The mean follow-up was 13.07 months (median 7, range 0.5-58 months). The indications for surgery included ectropion (43.2%), entropion (39.9%), eyelid laxity (12.3%), floppy eyelid syndrome (2.7%), and others (1.9%). At last follow-up, the LTS group achieved 89.1% anatomical success (total + partial correction) compared to 100% in Bick's group (P < 0.001). Functional improvement was 82% and 95% in LTS and Bick's groups, respectively (P = 0.002). Consultants and trainee doctors achieved comparable outcomes within each group. Complications were relatively minor with no major long-term sequelae, nor any statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of frequency of adverse events (16.9% vs 14.2%, P = 0.929). The reoperation rate was 9% in the LTS group during the study period, compared to none in the Bick's group (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study compares the outcomes of the largest reported cohort of eyelid malposition surgery analyzing the two different techniques for lid margin shortening. Bick's procedure achieved statistically significant better anatomical and functional outcomes compared to LTS although the samples were unequal and not randomized.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41433-018-0048-9

  9 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346172
[Au] Autor:Abboud JP; Whittington A; Ahmed M; Himebaugh JT; Wiley LA; Haffar A; Nguyen J
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, West Virginia University.
[Ti] Title:Apremilast Use in a Case of Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Severe Lamellar Ichthyosis.
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;, 2018 01 17.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ichthyosis is a cutaneous disorder characterized by excessive amounts of dry thickened skin surface scales. Ocular manifestations of ichthyosis include cicatricial ectropion, which may cause exposure keratoconjunctivitis and rarely corneal perforation. Topical emollients, anti-inflammatory ointments, and systemic retinoids have been used to control the disease process, while surgical correction with donor graft has been reserved for severe cases involving corneal exposure. The authors report a case of a Caucasian male with lamellar ichthyosis with severe bilateral upper and lower eyelid cicatricial ectropion and corneal ulceration requiring surgical correction. Treatment with apremilast, a novel phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, for the treatment of a concomitant plaque psoriasis achieved good control of his skin diseases and minimized the recurrence of eyelid ectropion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000001047

  10 / 1916 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28746254
[Au] Autor:Powell MR; Davies BW
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology and Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Graft-Versus-Host Disease.
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;34(1):e22-e23, 2018 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ocular complications of graft-versus-host disease are well documented. While skin changes due to graft-versus-host disease have been mentioned in the literature, cicatricial ectropion has not been previous reported. The authors present a case of a 31-year-old male with cicatricial ectropion secondary to graft-versus-host disease requiring treatment with a full thickness skin graft.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cicatrix/complications
Ectropion/etiology
Eyelids/surgery
Graft vs Host Disease/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Blepharoplasty
Cicatrix/diagnosis
Cicatrix/surgery
Ectropion/diagnosis
Ectropion/surgery
Eyelids/pathology
Humans
Male
Skin Transplantation/methods
Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000000973


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