Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ehrlichiosis [Words]
References found : 3008 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 301 go to page                         

  1 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29272385
[Au] Autor:Kingry LC; Anacker M; Pritt B; Bjork J; Respicio-Kingry L; Liu G; Sheldon S; Boxrud D; Strain A; Oatman S; Berry J; Sloan L; Mead P; Neitzel D; Kugeler KJ; Petersen JM
[Ad] Address:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Fort Collins, CO.
[Ti] Title:Surveillance for and Discovery of Borrelia Species in US Patients Suspected of Tickborne Illness.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Tick-transmitted Borrelia species fall into two heterogeneous bacterial complexes comprised of multiple species, the relapsing fever (RF) group and the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group, which are the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis (LB), the most common tickborne disease in the northern hemisphere. Geographic expansion of human LB in the United States and discovery of emerging Borrelia pathogens underscores the importance of surveillance for disease causing Borrelia. Methods: De-identified clinical specimens, submitted by providers throughout the United States, for patients suspected of LB, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, or babesiosis, were screened using a Borrelia genus level TaqMan PCR. Borrelia species and sequence types (STs) were characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) utilizing next generation sequencing. Results: Among the 7,292 tested specimens tested, five different Borrelia species were identified: two causing LB, B. burgdorferi (n=25) and B. mayonii (n=9), and three RF borreliae, B. hermsii (n=1), B. miyamotoi (n=8), and CandidatusB. johnsonii (n=1), a species previously detected only in the bat tick, Carios kelleyi. ST diversity was greatest for B. burgdorferi positive specimens, with new STs identified primarily among synovial fluids. Conclusion: These results demonstrate broad PCR screening followed by MLST is a powerful surveillance tool for uncovering the spectrum of Borrelia species causing human disease, improving understanding of their geographic distribution, and investigating the correlation between B. burgdorferi STs and joint involvement. Detection of CandidatusB. johnsonii in a patient with suspected tickborne disease suggests this species may be a previously undetected cause of illness in humans with exposure to bat ticks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1107

  2 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29202206
[Au] Autor:Koh FX; Kho KL; Kisomi MG; Wong LP; Bulgiba A; Tan PE; Lim YAL; Nizam QNH; Panchadcharam C; Tay ST
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Ehrlichia and Anaplasma Infections: Serological Evidence and Tick Surveillance in Peninsular Malaysia.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;55(2):269-276, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Little information is available on human anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis in Southeast Asia despite increasing reports of the detection of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in the ticks. We report herein the serological findings against the tick-borne pathogens in a group of animal farm workers (n = 87) and indigenous people (n = 102) in Peninsular Malaysia. IgG antibodies against Ehrlichia chaffeensis were detected from 29.9% and 34.3% of farm workers and indigenous people, respectively, using commercial indirect immunofluorescence assays. Comparatively, only 6.9% of the indigenous people but none of the animal farm workers were seropositive to Anaplasma phagocytophilum. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Anaplasmataceae was used to identify Anaplastamataceae in ticks collected from various locations adjacent to the areas where the serological survey was conducted. In this study, a total of 61.5% of ticks infesting farm animals, 37.5% of ticks infesting peri-domestic animals in rural villages, 27.3% of ticks collected from wildlife animals, and 29.1% of questing ticks collected from forest vegetation were positive for Anaplasmataceae DNA. Sequence analyses of 16S rRNA gene region (238 bp) provide the identification for Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, A. phagocytophilum, and Anaplasma spp. closely related to Candidatus Cryptoplasma californiense in ticks. E. chaffeensis DNA was not detected from any ticks, instead, Ehrlichia sp. strain EBm52, Ehrlichia mineirensis and Candidatus Ehrlichia shimanensis are the only Ehrlichia sp. identified from cattle ticks in this study. Further investigation is required to ascertain the occurrence of zoonotic transmission of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections in Peninsular Malaysia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx204

  3 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29350157
[Au] Autor:Herman-Giddens ME
[Ti] Title:Relative Risk for Ehrlichiosis and Lyme Disease Where Vectors for Both Are Sympatric, Southeastern United States.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(2):404-405, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2402.170962

  4 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29406569
[Au] Autor:Aroch I; Baneth G; Salant H; Nachum-Biala Y; Berkowitz A; Shamir M; Chai O
[Ad] Address:Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Neospora caninum and Ehrlichia canis co-infection in a dog with meningoencephalitis.
[So] Source:Vet Clin Pathol;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1939-165X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An 8-year-old mixed-breed dog was presented for acute, progressive weakness and ataxia, inappetence, and weight loss. The patient was mentally normal, but nonambulatory, with a right head tilt, right positional ventral strabismus, and slight head tremors. A neurologic lesion was localized to the cerebellum and right brainstem. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a markedly increased protein concentration and mixed pleocytosis, with eosinophil predominance (44%), intracytoplasmic inclusions within eosinophils, consistent with Ehrlichia canis (E canis) morulae, and Toxoplasma gondii (T gondii) or Neospora caninum (N caninum) tachyzoites within eosinophils and monocytes. A serum indirect immunofluorescent antibody test was positive for N caninum (titer 1:12 800) and negative for T gondii. Both blood and CSF PCR results were N caninum- and E canis-positive and T gondii- and Anaplasma phagocytophilum-negative, and blood PCR, but not CSF PCR, was Hepatozoon canis-positive. The dog was treated for 30 days with clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, doxycycline, prednisone, and cephalosporin, but did not improve neurologically, and was euthanized. Brain histopathology showed moderate multifocal, subacute meningoencephalitis with necrosis and gliosis. The neurologic disease was mostly attributed to central nervous system (CNS) neosporosis, with the possible contribution of ehrlichiosis, which was likely a manifestation of blood-brain barrier disruption. Hepatozoonosis was probably a result or cause of underlying immunosuppression. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CNSN caninum and E canis co-infection detected by both CSF PCR and cytology and E canis morulae identified within CSF eosinophils.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/vcp.12582

  5 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29402399
[Au] Autor:Bush LM; Vazquez-Pertejo MT
[Ad] Address:Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL; University of Miami-Miller School of Medicine, Palm Beach County, FL. Electronic address: drlarry561@aol.com.
[Ti] Title:Tick borne illness-Lyme disease.
[So] Source:Dis Mon;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8194
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borneillness in the United States. Thecausative spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted by 4 species of Ixodes tick species. Over 90% of US cases occur in northeasternstates from Maine to Virginia, and in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. Infection also takes place in northern California and Oregon. Lyme borreliosis is also diagnosed in parts of Europe, China, and Japan. The white-footed mouse is the primary animal reservoir for B. burgdorferi in the U.S. and the preferred host for nymphal and larval forms of the deer tick. Deer are hosts for the adult ticks but do not carry the spirochete. Signs and symptomsof infection occur in 3 stages; early localized, typified by erythema migrans; early disseminated with a flu-like syndrome, neurologic, and cardiac manifestations; and late, characteristically with arthritis. Although, the term 'Chronic Lyme Disease' has been assigned to many patients with a variety of unexplained symptoms, experts in the field question the validity of this diagnosis and warn against prolonged unproven antimicrobial therapies. Diagnosis relies upon clinical evaluation and is supported by serologic testing using a 2-step process which requires careful interpretation. Treatmentvaries with stage of disease, but normally includes doxycycline, amoxicillin,and ceftriaxone. Currently, no preventative vaccine is available. In some geographic areas, patients may be confected with Babesia, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma since the same Ixodes ticks transmit these pathogens.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29287758
[Au] Autor:Benelli G; Pavela R
[Ad] Address:Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy; The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: benelli.giovanni@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Repellence of essential oils and selected compounds against ticks-A systematic review.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;179:47-54, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ticks act as vectors of a wide range of infectious agents, far encompassing any other group of bloodsucking arthropods worldwide. The prevention of tick-borne diseases is strictly linked to the successful management of tick vector populations. The employ of repellents can represent a worth solution to avoid tick bites. It is widely adopted to protect travellers and pets exposed to ticks during limited periods of the year. The use of natural products as active ingredients in eco-friendly repellent formulations is currently a prominent research area, due to the wide diversity and high effectiveness of a number of plant-borne compounds, with special reference to essential oils (EOs) extracted from medicinal and aromatic species. Here, we reviewed current knowledge available on EOs tested as repellents against tick species of veterinary importance. Furthermore, we analysed the effectiveness of pure compounds isolated from EOs as tick repellents and their potential implications for practical use in the öreal world". A quantitative analysis of literature available is this research field was provided, along with its impact (i.e., in terms of citations over time) on the scientific community of researchers in tick control science and natural product chemistry. In the final sections, future outlooks are highlighted. We discussed major challenges to stabilize the most effective EOs and pure molecules, explore the synergistic and antagonistic effects in blends of EOs and/or pure constituents, standardize currently adopted testing methods, and evaluate non-target risks of herbal repellents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29398603
[Au] Autor:Eisen L
[Ad] Address:Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156, Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521, United States. Electronic address: evp4@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:Pathogen transmission in relation to duration of attachment by Ixodes scapularis ticks.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is the primary vector to humans in the eastern United States of the deer tick virus lineage of Powassan virus (Powassan virus disease); the protozoan parasite Babesia microti (babesiosis); and multiple bacterial disease agents including Anaplasma phagocytophilum (anaplasmosis), Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii (Lyme disease), Borrelia miyamotoi (relapsing fever-like illness, named Borrelia miyamotoi disease), and Ehrlichia muris eauclairensis (a minor causative agent of ehrlichiosis). With the notable exception of Powassan virus, which can be transmitted within minutes after attachment by an infected tick, there is no doubt that the risk of transmission of other I. scapularis-borne pathogens, including Lyme disease spirochetes, increases with the length of time (number of days) infected ticks are allowed to remain attached. This review summarizes data from experimental transmission studies to reinforce the important disease-prevention message that regular (at least daily) tick checks and prompt tick removal has strong potential to reduce the risk of transmission of I. scapularis-borne bacterial and parasitic pathogens from infected attached ticks. The most likely scenario for human exposure to an I. scapularis-borne pathogen is the bite by a single infected tick. However, recent reviews have failed to make a clear distinction between data based on transmission studies where experimental hosts were fed upon by a single versus multiple infected ticks. A summary of data from experimental studies on transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes (Bo. burgdorferi and Bo. mayonii) by I. scapularis nymphs indicates that the probability of transmission resulting in host infection, at time points from 24 to 72 h after nymphal attachment, is higher when multiple infected ticks feed together as compared to feeding by a single infected tick. In the specific context of risk for human infection, the most relevant experimental studies therefore are those where the probability of pathogen transmission at a given point in time after attachment was determined using a single infected tick. The minimum duration of attachment by single infected I. scapularis nymphs required for transmission to result in host infection is poorly defined for most pathogens, but experimental studies have shown that Powassan virus can be transmitted within 15 min of tick attachment and both A. phagocytophilum and Bo. miyamotoi within the first 24 h of attachment. There is no experimental evidence for transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes by single infected I. scapularis nymphs to result in host infection when ticks are attached for only 24 h (despite exposure of nearly 90 experimental rodent hosts across multiple studies) but the probability of transmission resulting in host infection appears to increase to approximately 10% by 48 h and reach 70% by 72 h for Bo. burgdorferi. Caveats to the results from experimental transmission studies, including specific circumstances (such as re-attachment of previously partially fed infected ticks) that may lead to more rapid transmission are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29336985
[Au] Autor:Eisen RJ; Eisen L
[Ad] Address:Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO, USA. Electronic address: dyn2@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:The Blacklegged Tick, Ixodes scapularis: An Increasing Public Health Concern.
[So] Source:Trends Parasitol;, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:1471-5007
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the United States, the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is a vector of seven human pathogens, including those causing Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, Borrelia miyamotoi disease, Powassan virus disease, and ehrlichiosis associated with Ehrlichia muris eauclarensis. In addition to an accelerated rate of discovery of I. scapularis-borne pathogens over the past two decades, the geographic range of the tick, and incidence and range of I. scapularis-borne disease cases, have increased. Despite knowledge of when and where humans are most at risk of exposure to infected ticks, control of I. scapularis-borne diseases remains a challenge. Human vaccines are not available, and we lack solid evidence for other prevention and control methods to reduce human disease. The way forward is discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29291792
[Au] Autor:Bunroddith K; Viseshakul N; Chansiri K; Lieberzeit P
[Ad] Address:Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, 114 Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:QCM-based rapid detection of PCR amplification products of Ehrlichia canis.
[So] Source:Anal Chim Acta;1001:106-111, 2018 Feb 25.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4324
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ehrlichia canis is an intracellular parasitic bacterium and arthropod-borne pathogen that receives growing attention, because it leads to increasing morbidity and mortality in animals. It does so by causing canine monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (CME). Infected canines may lack obvious clinical signs and stay in chronic stage. Herein we report a rapid screening method based on PCR assay combined with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to design a DNA sensor for detecting E. canis in early stages of infection. The test relies on DNA amplification of target nucleotide sequences via PCR followed by detecting DNA-DNA hybridization using QCM. The approach did not result in any cross-hybridization toward other blood bacteria or parasites in dogs, such as Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis and Trypanosoma spp, but turned out selective for the target species. The limit of detection of QCM was as low as 4.1 × 10 molecules/µl of 289 bp E. canis PCR products corresponding to 22 copy numbers/µl of E. canis. Furthermore, the technique is also simple, does not require complicated equipment and can in principle be reused.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 3008 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29254723
[Au] Autor:Mittal M; Kundu K; Chakravarti S; Mohapatra JK; Nehra K; Sinha VK; Sanjeeth BS; Churamani CP; Kumar A
[Ad] Address:Central Military Veterinary Laboratory (CMVL), Sardhana Road, Meerut Cantt, Meerut, Uttar-Pradesh, India; Defence Institute of Bio-Energy Research (DIBER), Project Site Secunderabad, Military Farm Road, Old Bowenpally, Secunderabad, Telangana State, India. Electronic address: mitesh_mittal@rediffmai
[Ti] Title:Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis among working dogs of organised kennels in India: A comprehensive analyses of clinico-pathology, serological and molecular epidemiological approach.
[So] Source:Prev Vet Med;147:26-33, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1716
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME) is a serious tick-borne rickettsial disease affecting canine populations globally. Besides few reports from stray and pet dogs from localised geographical regions (cities/towns/small states), a comprehensive study on prevalence of Ehrlichia canis (E. canis) among working dogs from different geo-climatic zones of India was pertinently lacking. Study of CME among these dog populations was thus carried out, encompassing clinical aspects and different diagnostic methodologies viz., microscopy, serology and molecular biology. During the two-year study period, clinical specimens from 225 cases suspected of canine ehrlichiosis were examined for clinical pathology and presence of the haemoparasites. Overall prevalence of ehrlichiosis by microscopic examination, commercial dot-ELISA kit and nested PCR assay was estimated to be 1.3%, 19.1% and 5.8%, respectively, which were found to be statistically significant by McNemar Chi squared test (p<0.05). It was also observed that possibly due to widespread use of doxycycline therapy in field, CME presently does not remain a potential threat which it uses to pose earlier. However, concurrent infections of E. canis and Babesia gibsoni were found to be mostly fatal. Keeping in view of high number of apparently healthy dogs (24) out of total positive cases (46) observed during the study, it is recommended that prevalence studies on CME should also involve screening of apparently healthy dogs. Phylogenetic analysis carried on partial sequencing of 16S rRNA of E. canis strains revealed that all of the Indian strains clustered in a single clade with other E. canis species from India and rest of the world. Molecular divergence was observed among the sequences of Brazilian and American isolates which were also included in the present study. These findings have thus opened a new paradigm for planning of pragmatic control strategies against CME.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Process


page 1 of 301 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information