Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29515118
[Au] Autor:Yang P; Zou X; Zhang Z; Hong M; Shi J; Chen S; Shu J; Zhao L; Jiang S; Zhou X; Huan Y; Xie C; Gao P; Chen Q; Zhang Q; Liu Z; Zhang Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
[Ti] Title:Batch production of 6-inch uniform monolayer molybdenum disulfide catalyzed by sodium in glass.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):979, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have become essential two-dimensional materials for their perspectives in engineering next-generation electronics. For related applications, the controlled growth of large-area uniform monolayer TMDs is crucial, while it remains challenging. Herein, we report the direct synthesis of 6-inch uniform monolayer molybdenum disulfide on the solid soda-lime glass, through a designed face-to-face metal-precursor supply route in a facile chemical vapor deposition process. We find that the highly uniform monolayer film, with the composite domains possessing an edge length larger than 400 µm, can be achieved within a quite short time of 8 min. This highly efficient growth is proven to be facilitated by sodium catalysts that are homogenously distributed in glass, according to our experimental facts and density functional theory calculations. This work provides insights into the batch production of highly uniform TMD films on the functional glass substrate with the advantages of low cost, easily transferrable, and compatible with direct applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-03388-5

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[PMID]: 29522681
[Au] Autor:Wang Q; Yang F; Zhang Y; Chen M; Zhang X; Lei S; Li R; Hu W
[Ti] Title:Space-Confined Strategy towards Large-Area Two-dimensional Single Crystals of Molecular Materials.
[So] Source:J Am Chem Soc;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5126
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two-dimensional molecular crystals (2DMCs) are promising candidate for flexible and large-area electronics. Their large-area production requires both low nuclei density and 2D crystal growth mode. As an emerging type of material, their large-area production remains a case-by-case practice. Here we present a general, efficient strategy for large-area 2DMCs. The method grows crystals on water surface to minimize the density of nuclei. By control-ling the interfacial tension of the water/solution system with a phase transfer surfactant, the spreading area of the solvent increases tens of times, leading to the space-confined 2D growth of molecular crystals. As-grown sub-centimeter sized 2DMCs floating on the water surface can be easily transferred to arbitrary substrates for device applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/jacs.8b01997

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[PMID]: 29483694
[Au] Autor:Benfenati F; Lanzani G
[Ad] Address:Center for Synaptic Neuroscience and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genoa, Italy. Fabio.Benfenati@iit.it.
[Ti] Title:New technologies for developing second generation retinal prostheses.
[So] Source:Lab Anim (NY);47(3):71-75, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1548-4475
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inherited or age-dependent retinal dystrophies such as Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and macular degeneration (MD) are among the most prevalent causes of blindness. Despite enormous efforts, no established pharmacological treatment to prevent or cure photoreceptor degeneration has been identified. Given the relative survival of the inner retina, attempts have been made to restore vision with optogenetics or with retinal neuroprostheses to allow light-dependent stimulation of the inner retinal network. While microelectrode and photovoltaic devices based on inorganic technologies have been proposed and in many cases implanted in RP patients, a new generation of prosthetics based on organic molecules, such as organic photoswitches and conjugated polymers, is demonstrating an unexpected potential for visual rescue and intimate interactions with functioning tissue. Organic devices are starting a new era of tissue electronics, in which light-sensitive molecules and live tissues integrate and tightly interact, producing a new ecosystem of organic prosthetics and intelligent biotic/abiotic interfaces. In addition to the retina, the applications of these interfaces might be extended in the future to other biomedical fields.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41684-018-0003-1

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[PMID]: 29408942
[Au] Autor:Slipher GA; Hairston WD; Bradford JC; Bain ED; Mrozek RA
[Ad] Address:Vehicle Technologies Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, MD, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Carbon nanofiber-filled conductive silicone elastomers as soft, dry bioelectronic interfaces.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0189415, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soft and pliable conductive polymer composites hold promise for application as bioelectronic interfaces such as for electroencephalography (EEG). In clinical, laboratory, and real-world EEG there is a desire for dry, soft, and comfortable interfaces to the scalp that are capable of relaying the µV-level scalp potentials to signal processing electronics. A key challenge is that most material approaches are sensitive to deformation-induced shifts in electrical impedance associated with decreased signal-to-noise ratio. This is a particular concern in real-world environments where human motion is present. The entire set of brain information outside of tightly controlled laboratory or clinical settings are currently unobtainable due to this challenge. Here we explore the performance of an elastomeric material solution purposefully designed for dry, soft, comfortable scalp contact electrodes for EEG that is specifically targeted to have flat electrical impedance response to deformation to enable utilization in real world environments. A conductive carbon nanofiber filled polydimethylsiloxane (CNF-PDMS) elastomer was evaluated at three fill ratios (3, 4 and 7 volume percent). Electromechanical testing data is presented showing the influence of large compressive deformations on electrical impedance as well as the impact of filler loading on the elastomer stiffness. To evaluate usability for EEG, pre-recorded human EEG signals were replayed through the contact electrodes subjected to quasi-static compressive strains between zero and 35%. These tests show that conductive filler ratios well above the electrical percolation threshold are desirable in order to maximize signal-to-noise ratio and signal correlation with an ideal baseline. Increasing fill ratios yield increasingly flat electrical impedance response to large applied compressive deformations with a trade in increased material stiffness, and with nominal electrical impedance tunable over greater than 4 orders of magnitude. EEG performance was independent of filler loading above 4 vol % CNF (< 103 ohms).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bioengineering
Carbon/chemistry
Nanofibers
Silicone Elastomers
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Electroencephalography
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Silicone Elastomers); 7440-44-0 (Carbon)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189415

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[PMID]: 29521501
[Au] Autor:Andrew TL; Zhang L; Cheng N; Baima M; Kim JJ; Allison L; Hoxie S
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry , University of Massachusetts Amherst , Amherst , Massachusetts 01003 , United States.
[Ti] Title:Melding Vapor-Phase Organic Chemistry and Textile Manufacturing To Produce Wearable Electronics.
[So] Source:Acc Chem Res;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1520-4898
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Body-mountable electronics and electronically active garments are the future of portable, interactive devices. However, wearable devices and electronic garments are demanding technology platforms because of the large, varied mechanical stresses to which they are routinely subjected, which can easily abrade or damage microelectronic components and electronic interconnects. Furthermore, aesthetics and tactile perception (or feel) can make or break a nascent wearable technology, irrespective of device metrics. The breathability and comfort of commercial fabrics is unmatched. There is strong motivation to use something that is already familiar, such as cotton/silk thread, fabrics, and clothes, and imperceptibly adapt it to a new technological application. (24) Especially for smart garments, the intrinsic breathability, comfort, and feel of familiar fabrics cannot be replicated by devices built on metalized synthetic fabrics or cladded, often-heavy designer fibers. We propose that the strongest strategy to create long-lasting and impactful electronic garments is to start with a mass-produced article of clothing, fabric, or thread/yarn and coat it with conjugated polymers to yield various textile circuit components. Commonly available, mass-produced fabrics, yarns/threads, and premade garments can in theory be transformed into a plethora of comfortably wearable electronic devices upon being coated with films of electronically active conjugated polymers. The definitive hurdle is that premade garments, threads, and fabrics have densely textured, three-dimensional surfaces that display roughness over a large range of length scales, from microns to millimeters. Tremendous variation in the surface morphology of conjugated-polymer-coated fibers and fabrics can be observed with different coating or processing conditions. In turn, the morphology of the conjugated polymer active layer determines the electrical performance and, most importantly, the device ruggedness and lifetime. Reactive vapor coating methods allow a conjugated polymer film to be directly formed on the surface of any premade garment, prewoven fabric, or fiber/yarn substrate without the need for specialized processing conditions, surface pretreatments, detergents, or fixing agents. This feature allows electronic coatings to be applied at the end of existing, high-throughput textile and garment manufacturing routines, irrespective of dye content or surface finish of the final textile. Furthermore, reactive vapor coating produces conductive materials without any insulating moieties and yields uniform and conformal films on fiber/fabric surfaces that are notably wash- and wear-stable and can withstand mechanically demanding textile manufacturing routines. These unique features mean that rugged and practical textile electronic devices can be created using sewing, weaving, or knitting procedures without compromising or otherwise affecting the surface electronic coating. In this Account, we highlight selected electronic fabrics and garments created by melding reactive vapor deposition with traditional textile manipulation processes, including electrically heated gloves that are lightweight, breathable, and sweat-resistant; surface-coated cotton, silk, and bast fiber threads capable of carrying large current densities and acting as sewable circuit interconnects; and surface-coated nylon threads woven together to form triboelectric textiles that can convert surface charge created during small body movements into usable and storable power.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.accounts.7b00604

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[PMID]: 29519033
[Au] Autor:Lassen M; Harder DB; Brusch A; Nielsen OS; Heikens D; Persijn S; Petersen JC
[Ti] Title:Photo-acoustic sensor for detection of oil contamination in compressed air systems.
[So] Source:Opt Express;25(3):1806-1814, 2017 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1094-4087
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We demonstrate an online (in-situ) sensor for continuous detection of oil contamination in compressed air systems complying with the ISO-8573 standard. The sensor is based on the photo-acoustic (PA) effect. The online and real-time PA sensor system has the potential to benefit a wide range of users that require high purity compressed air. Among these are hospitals, pharmaceutical industries, electronics manufacturers, and clean room facilities. The sensor was tested for sensitivity, repeatability, robustness to molecular cross-interference, and stability of calibration. Explicit measurements of hexane (C6H14) and decane (C10H22) vapors via excitation of molecular C-H vibrations at approx. 2950 cm-1 (3.38 µm) were conducted with a custom made interband cascade laser (ICL). For the decane measurements a (1 σ) standard deviation (STD) of 0.3 ppb was demonstrated, which corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficient for the prototype PA sensor of 2.8×10-9 W cm-1 Hz1/2.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1364/OE.25.001806

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[PMID]: 29488263
[Au] Autor:Tybrandt K; Khodagholy D; Dielacher B; Stauffer F; Renz AF; Buzsáki G; Vörös J
[Ad] Address:Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:High-Density Stretchable Electrode Grids for Chronic Neural Recording.
[So] Source:Adv Mater;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1521-4095
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Electrical interfacing with neural tissue is key to advancing diagnosis and therapies for neurological disorders, as well as providing detailed information about neural signals. A challenge for creating long-term stable interfaces between electronics and neural tissue is the huge mechanical mismatch between the systems. So far, materials and fabrication processes have restricted the development of soft electrode grids able to combine high performance, long-term stability, and high electrode density, aspects all essential for neural interfacing. Here, this challenge is addressed by developing a soft, high-density, stretchable electrode grid based on an inert, high-performance composite material comprising gold-coated titanium dioxide nanowires embedded in a silicone matrix. The developed grid can resolve high spatiotemporal neural signals from the surface of the cortex in freely moving rats with stable neural recording quality and preserved electrode signal coherence during 3 months of implantation. Due to its flexible and stretchable nature, it is possible to minimize the size of the craniotomy required for placement, further reducing the level of invasiveness. The material and device technology presented herein have potential for a wide range of emerging biomedical applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/adma.201706520

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[PMID]: 29446761
[Au] Autor:Li K; Wei H; Liu W; Meng H; Zhang P; Yan C
[Ad] Address:School of Advanced Materials, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518005, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:3D printed stretchable capacitive sensors for highly sensitive tactile and electrochemical sensing.
[So] Source:Nanotechnology;29(18):185501, 2018 May 04.
[Is] ISSN:1361-6528
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Developments of innovative strategies for the fabrication of stretchable sensors are of crucial importance for their applications in wearable electronic systems. In this work, we report the successful fabrication of stretchable capacitive sensors using a novel 3D printing method for highly sensitive tactile and electrochemical sensing applications. Unlike conventional lithographic or templated methods, the programmable 3D printing technique can fabricate complex device structures in a cost-effective and facile manner. We designed and fabricated stretchable capacitive sensors with interdigital and double-vortex designs and demonstrated their successful applications as tactile and electrochemical sensors. Especially, our stretchable sensors exhibited a detection limit as low as 1 × 10 M for NaCl aqueous solution, which could have significant potential applications when integrated in electronics skins.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1088/1361-6528/aaafa5

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[PMID]: 29366799
[Au] Autor:Moura JMBM; Gohr Pinheiro I; Carmo JL
[Ad] Address:Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Ambiental, Fundação Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Rua São Paulo, 3250 - Itoupava Seca, Campus II, Bloco I - Sala 103, 89.030-000 Blumenau, SC, Brasil. Electronic address: joaomarcosmm@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Gravimetric composition of the rejects coming from the segregation process of the municipal recyclable wastes.
[So] Source:Waste Manag;74:98-109, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2456
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rejects from selective collection are municipal solid waste (MSW) not used for recycling and are, therefore, destined for the landfill in Brazil. Knowledge of the composition and generation of this waste is important for strategically planning public policies that minimize its generation and its negative environmental impacts. However, this portion of MSW is not very well known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the rejects from the sorting process of the selective waste collection in the municipality of Blumenau, in the State of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. The studied rejects came from the largest cooperative in the city, and its composition was sorted into 17 categories of 101 samples over the course of one year, with a total of 3893 kg of analyzed rejects. The waste collected by the selective collection of the municipality was evaluated monthly to determine which part of this quantity became rejects and to determine the composition and seasonality of these rejects. The study found that 30.5% of the waste sorted by the cooperative was rejected. Among these rejects, the presence of materials that could be marketed by the cooperative was verified. Hazardous and/or legally prohibited waste were also identified, as were organics, construction and demolition waste, health care waste, electronics, textiles, footwear, batteries, and bulbs. Seasonal analysis indicated a concerning constant generation of health care waste. Aside from that, there was an increase in the generation of waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) during the Christmas period, when a large part of the population discards their EEE. This information is important for the enforcement of the MSW management structure as well as for educational campaigns aimed at the correct separation of waste that should be sent for selective collection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 26775 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29356373
[Au] Autor:Homola T; Pospísil J; Krumpolec R; Soucek P; Dzik P; Weiter M; Cernák M
[Ad] Address:R&D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modifications (CEPLANT), Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlárská 267/2, 611 37, Brno, Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:Atmospheric Dry Hydrogen Plasma Reduction of Inkjet-Printed Flexible Graphene Oxide Electrodes.
[So] Source:ChemSusChem;11(5):941-947, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1864-564X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study concerns a low-temperature method for dry hydrogen plasma reduction of inkjet-printed flexible graphene oxide (GO) electrodes, an approach compatible with processes envisaged for the manufacture of flexible electronics. The processing of GO to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was performed in 1-64 s, and sp /sp +sp carbon concentration increased from approximately 20 % to 90 %. Since the plasma reduction was associated with an etching effect, the optimal reduction time occurred between 8 and 16 s. The surface showed good mechanical stability when deposited on polyethylene terephthalate flexible foils and significantly lower sheet resistance after plasma reduction. This method for dry plasma reduction could be important for large-area hydrogenation and reduction of GO flexible surfaces, with present and potential applications in a wide variety of emerging technologies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/cssc.201702139


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