Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Emphysematous and Cholecystitis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29380004
[Au] Autor:Bundy J; Srinivasa RN; Gemmete JJ; Shields JJ; Chick JFB
[Ad] Address:Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
[Ti] Title:Percutaneous Cholecystostomy: Long-Term Outcomes in 324 Patients.
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1432-086X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To report technical success and clinical outcome of cholecystostomy tube placement along with timing-and method-of tube removal. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of cholecystostomy tubes placed from January 2010 to September 2017 was performed at a single academic center. This search yielded 1160 patients. Of these patients, 324 (27.9%) met inclusion criteria for cholecystostomy placement, 199 (61.4%) males and 125 (38.6%) females, with mean age of 67 years (range 6-101 years). The indication for cholecystostomy tube placement, technical success, surgical candidacy, medical comorbidities, clinical outcome, tube indwelling time, complications, and follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Indications for cholecystostomy tube placement included: acute cholecystitis (n = 270; 83.3%), perforated cholecystitis (n = 22; 6.8%), emphysematous cholecystitis (n = 18; 5.6%), and other (n = 14; 4.3%). Technical success was 100%. Many patients had multiple medical comorbidities including (most commonly): debilitation (n = 211; 65.1%), cardiovascular disease (n = 194; 59.9%), multisystem disease (n = 181; 55.9%), and malignancy (n = 131; 40.4%). After tube placement, 96 (29.6%) patients underwent definitive cholecystectomy, 94 expired (29.0%), 36 (11.1%) had a patent cystic duct on follow-up cholangiogram and subsequent cholecystostomy removal, 14 (4.3%) underwent cholecystoscopy with stone removal, and 3 (0.9%) had liver transplantation. Forty-five (13.9%) patients had indwelling tubes at the end of the study period. Mean tube indwelling time was 89 days (range 0-586 days). CONCLUSION: Technical success for cholecystostomy tube placement was 100% with all patients having clinical resolution of acute cholecystitis. Many patients were able to have tubes subsequently removed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00270-018-1884-5

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[PMID]: 29271871
[Au] Autor:Vera K; Pei KY; Schuster KM; Davis KA
[Ad] Address:Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, New Haven, Connecticut.
[Ti] Title:"Validation of a new American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) anatomic severity grading system for acute cholecystitis."
[So] Source:J Trauma Acute Care Surg;, 2017 Dec 21.
[Is] ISSN:2163-0763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) established anatomic grading to facilitate risk stratification and risk adjusted outcomes in emergency general surgery. Cholecystitis severity was graded based on clinical, imaging, operative, and pathologic criteria. We aimed to validate the AAST anatomic grading system for acute cholecystitis. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study including consecutive patients admitted with acute cholecystitis at an urban, tertiary medical center between 2013 and 2016. Grade I is acute cholecystitis, Grade II is gangrenous or emphysematous cholecystitis, Grade III is localized perforation, Grade IV and V have regional and systemic peritonitis, respectively. Concordance between the AAST grade and outcome including mortality, length of stay (LOS), ICU use, readmission, and complications were assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 315 patients were included. There was very good interrater (2 independent raters) reliability for anatomic grading, κ=1.00, p<0.005. The majority of patients were Grade 1 or Grade 2 (94%). Incidence of complications, LOS, ICU use, and any adverse event increased with increasing anatomic grade. When compared to Grade 1 disease, patients with Grade 2 were more likely to undergo cholecystectomy (OR 4.07 [1.93-8.56]). Grade 3 patients were at higher risk of adverse events (OR 3.83 [1.34-10.94]), longer LOS (OR 1.73 [1.03-2.92]), and ICU use (OR 8.07 [2.43-26.80]). CONCLUSIONS: AAST severity scores were independently associated with clinical outcomes in patients with acute cholecystitis. Despite low-grade disease, complications were common, and therefore a refinement of the scoring system may be necessary for more granular prediction. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic/prognostic, level III.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000001762

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[PMID]: 29104833
[Au] Autor:Wexler BB; Panebianco NL
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:The Effervescent Gallbladder: An Emergency Medicine Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Emphysematous Cholecystitis.
[So] Source:Cureus;9(7):e1520, 2017 Jul 27.
[Is] ISSN:2168-8184
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emphysematous cholecystitis (EC) is a distinct clinical disease that carries a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Maintaining a high index of suspicion, especially in the right patient population, combined with emergency bedside ultrasound can lead to rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment for this life threatening condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171108
[Lr] Last revision date:171108
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7759/cureus.1520

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[PMID]: 28516371
[Au] Autor:Iino C; Shimoyama T; Igarashi T; Aihara T; Ishii K; Sakamoto J; Tono H; Fukuda S
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Hirosaki Municipal Hospital, 8-1, 3chome, Omachi, Hirosaki, Aomori, 036-8004, Japan. chikaran0601@yahoo.co.jp.
[Ti] Title:Perforated emphysematous cholecystitis managed by endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage.
[So] Source:Clin J Gastroenterol;10(4):388-391, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1865-7265
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An 88-year-old woman with dementia was diagnosed as having perforated emphysematous cholecystitis with localized peritonitis. Because she was at high risk for surgery, gallbladder drainage was required before surgery. Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage instead of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed because bile could leak from the puncture site to free space around the perforated gallbladder. After the insertion of a nasobiliary drainage tube, the gallbladder was drained and cleaned with saline solution. Subsequently, a nasobiliary drainage tube was replaced with a double-pigtail stent because she was at high risk of dislodging the nasobiliary drainage tube. Although clinical improvement was observed, she was treated conservatively without surgery. She was followed up for 6 months without developing cholecystitis. For perforated cholecystitis without developing panperitonitis, endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage would be an effective option as a bridge to surgery for the initial treatment and as an alternative to surgery for long-term management for a later treatment. This is the first reported case of perforated emphysematous cholecystitis with localized peritonitis treated with endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170720
[Lr] Last revision date:170720
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12328-017-0746-z

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[PMID]: 28421150
[Au] Autor:Stack R; McLoughlin J; Gillis A; Ryan BM
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Tallaght Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Post-ERCP Emphysematous Cholecystitis in a Young Woman: A Rare and Potentially Fatal Complication.
[So] Source:Case Rep Gastrointest Med;2017:1971457, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2090-6528
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 45-year-old woman with suspected Functional Biliary Sphincter Disorder (FBSD) developed related emphysematous cholecystitis after ERCP. A low index of suspicion for emphysematous cholecystitis in this young, otherwise healthy woman led to a significant delay in making the correct diagnosis, and air in the gallbladder was wrongly attributed to a possible gallbladder perforation. ERCP is associated with significant risks, particularly in patients with FBSD, where diagnostic uncertainty renders the balance of risk versus benefit even more critical. Post-ERCP emphysematous cholecystitis secondary to is a rare but potentially fatal complication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170423
[Lr] Last revision date:170423
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/1971457

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[PMID]: 28367016
[Au] Autor:Aherne A; Ozaki R; Tobey N; Secko M
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Ultrasound, Kings County Hospital Center, Downstate University Hospital, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA E-mail: Andrew.aherne@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of emphysematous cholecystitis with bedside ultrasound in a septic elderly female with no source of infection.
[So] Source:J Emerg Trauma Shock;10(2):85-86, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0974-2700
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/JETS.JETS_75_16

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[PMID]: 28321062
[Au] Autor:Yoshimatsu Y; Takai T; Abe Y; Nakagawa T
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yodogawa Christian Hospital, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The Presence of Venous Gas Does Not Affect the Prognosis in Emphysematous Cystitis.
[So] Source:Intern Med;56(6):637-640, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective Emphysematous cystitis (EC) has a high mortality rate compared with urinary tract infection without emphysema. However, its prognostic factors have yet to be determined. The presence of venous gas is suspected to be a rare, adverse prognostic factor of EC. However, all four previously reported cases improved. We hypothesized that venous gas is not an adverse prognostic factor of EC and aimed to assess the effect of venous gas on the EC prognosis. Methods Medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Patients The patients diagnosed with EC at Yodogawa Christian Hospital between April 2004 and September 2014 were included. Results Venous gas was present in 15 of 23 patients with EC. There was no significant difference in the background or clinical presentation between patients with or without venous gas. All patients with venous gas survived without invasive measures, whereas 50% of patients without venous gas died. Conclusion There was no marked difference in the mortality rate due to EC between the patients with and without venous gas. Venous gas may be a more common and less worrying finding in EC than assumed. It does not reflect the severity of infection, and air embolisms have not been reported so far. Venous gas may not affect the prognosis. This may be due to the differences in the mechanism of venous gas production. Gas in EC may develop due to glucose fermentation and intravesical pressurization, in contrast to the necrotizing infection seen in other emphysematous infections. This is the first study to assess the effect of venous gas on EC prognosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Emphysematous Cholecystitis/diagnosis
Veins/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Emphysematous Cholecystitis/diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170516
[Lr] Last revision date:170516
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170322
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.56.7601

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[PMID]: 28062742
[Au] Autor:Khan M; Little M; Campbell G; Laasch HU; Cooksley T
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Acute Oncology.
[Ti] Title:Emphysematous cholecystitis in a patient with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour.
[So] Source:QJM;110(4):235-236, 2017 Apr 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2393
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170418
[Lr] Last revision date:170418
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/qjmed/hcx012

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[PMID]: 26922627
[Au] Autor:Kim KH; Kim SJ; Lee SC; Lee SK
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Risk assessment scales and predictors for simple versus severe cholecystitis in performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
[So] Source:Asian J Surg;40(5):367-374, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0219-3108
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Because acute cholecystitis has a different prognosis according to the degree of inflammation, early detection and prompt operation of severe cholecystitis are critical to the success of treatment. However, computed tomography (CT) has a low discriminative value for differentiating between simple and severe cholecystitis. Therefore, to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of CT scan, the imaging studies should be supplemented by preoperative clinical variables. METHODS: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy for simple and severe cholecystitis between 2007 and 2014 were compared. Severe cholecystitis included hemorrhagic, gangrenous, emphysematous, xanthogranulomatous, and perforated cholecystitis. Prediction models for severe cholecystitis were developed based on multivariate analyses of preoperative clinical and radiologic variables. RESULTS: Independent factors related with severe cholecystitis were age ≥65 years, male gender, body mass index (BMI) ≥25, serum leukocyte count ≥10,000/mm , serum neutrophil fraction ≥80%, serum platelet count ≥20,000/mm , serum alanine transaminase (ALT) level ≥40 IU/L, admission via the emergency department, and radiologic features of gallbladder wall thickening ≥4 mm, and presence of pericholecystic fluid collection (p < 0.05). A standard risk assessment scale (range: 0-77) for severe cholecystitis was developed based on the individual hazard rate of these variables. Patients scoring ≥28 on the risk assessment scale showed an 8.6 higher odds of severe cholecystitis than those scoring <28 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Standard and quick-and-easy predictive models for severe cholecystitis have been developed based on preoperative radiological and clinical variables, which is expected to help improve surgical outcome of patients with cholecystitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 170829
[Lr] Last revision date:170829
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28757718
[Au] Autor:Yen WL; Hsu CF; Tsai MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Emphysematous cholecystitis.
[So] Source:Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi;28(1):37-38, 2016 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1016-3190
[Cp] Country of publication:China (Republic : 1949- )
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170804
[Lr] Last revision date:170804
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.tcmj.2015.12.001


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