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Search on : Eriogonum [Words]
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[PMID]: 28332893
[Au] Autor:Hong H; Park J; Lumbera WL; Hwang SG
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine , Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Monascus ruber-Fermented Buckwheat (Red Yeast Buckwheat) Suppresses Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Cells.
[So] Source:J Med Food;20(4):352-359, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7600
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although various treatments have been used for weight loss to date, obese people rarely have safe and effective treatment options. Therefore, the antiobesity effects of several natural compounds are being actively investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the antiadipogenic effects of Monascus ruber-fermented Fagopyrum esculentum (red yeast buckwheat, RYB) in 3T3-L1 cells. We assessed the intracellular lipid content and adipocyte differentiation by oil red O staining and the expression of genes and proteins associated with adipocyte differentiation by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting in 3T3-L1 cells. RYB dose dependently inhibited 3T3-L1 cell differentiation at concentrations of 50-800 µg/mL, without cytotoxic effects. It also suppressed the expression of adipogenic transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, and adipocyte-specific genes, such as adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), fatty acid synthase, and leptin, during preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Furthermore, RYB reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and cyclin expression and increased p21 and p27 expression, thus causing cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase. Collectively, these results suggest that RYB may be an effective nutraceutical for weight loss as indicated by its ability to suppress adipogenesis-specific gene expression and cause cell cycle arrest at the G1/S interphase.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adipocytes/drug effects
Adipogenesis/drug effects
Anti-Obesity Agents/chemistry
Eriogonum/chemistry
Fermentation
Monascus/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 3T3-L1 Cells
Animals
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Cell Differentiation
Fatty Acid Synthases/chemistry
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/chemistry
Gene Expression
Leptin/chemistry
Lipids/chemistry
Mice
Obesity/drug therapy
Transcription Factors/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Obesity Agents); 0 (Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins); 0 (Leptin); 0 (Lipids); 0 (Transcription Factors); EC 2.3.1.85 (Fatty Acid Synthases)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170515
[Lr] Last revision date:170515
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170324
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/jmf.2016.3761

  2 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27257121
[Au] Autor:Briggs CM; Redak RA
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Mt. San Antonio College, 1100 North Grand Ave., Walnut, CA 91789 (christopher.briggs@mtsac.edu) christopher.briggs@mtsac.edu.
[Ti] Title:Seed Selection by the Harvester Ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Coastal Sage Scrub: Interactions With Invasive Plant Species.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;45(4):983-90, 2016 08.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Harvester ants can be the dominant seed predators on plants by collecting and eating seeds and are known to influence plant communities. Harvester ants are abundant in coastal sage scrub (CSS), and CSS is frequently invaded by several exotic plant species. This study used observations of foraging and cafeteria-style experiments to test for seed species selection by the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in CSS. Analysis of foraging behavior showed that P. rugosus carried seeds of exotic Erodium cicutarium (L.) and exotic Brassica tournefortii (Gouan) on 85 and 15% of return trips to the nest (respectively), and only a very few ants carried the native seeds found within the study areas. When compared with the availability of seeds in the field, P. rugosus selected exotic E. cicutarium and avoided both native Encelia farinosa (Torrey & A. Gray) and exotic B. tournefortii. Foraging by P. rugosus had no major effect on the seed bank in the field. Cafeteria-style experiments confirmed that P. rugosus selected E. cicutarium over other available seeds. Native Eriogonum fasciculatum (Bentham) seeds were even less selected than E. farinosa and B. tournefortii.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ants/physiology
Introduced Species
Seeds
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Brassica/growth & development
California
Feeding Behavior/physiology
Geraniaceae/growth & development
Seed Dispersal
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171126
[Lr] Last revision date:171126
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160604
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvw042

  3 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25998651
[Au] Autor:Arguelles P; Reinhard K; Shin DH
[Ad] Address:Forensic Science Degree Program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska.
[Ti] Title:Forensic palynological analysis of intestinal contents of a Korean mummy.
[So] Source:Anat Rec (Hoboken);298(6):1182-90, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1932-8494
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Experimental studies show that pollen resides in the intestinal tract for a minimum of seven days to at least 21 days. Because of this long residence time, pollen analysis is an important avenue of forensic research. Pollen provides evidence of the environment of the decedent as well as foods and medicine. We analyzed a coprolite recovered from a Korean mummy. The decedent was a high-ranking general who lived during the 16th or 17th centuries. Twenty pollen types were recovered. These ranged from 100 s to 10,000 s of pollen grains per gram of coprolite. Importantly, comparison of the coprolite pollen spectrum to modern aeropalynology studies of Korea suggests that the general died in winter between middle November to late February. Economic pollen types were most abundant. Economic refers to dietary, medicinal, spice, and beverage types. Dietary pollen types include pollen from Oryza (rice), Eriogonum (buckwheat), Brassicaceae (mustard family), and Solanaceae (tomato-chile pepper family). Pollen consistent with dandelion is present and may represent its use as food. Tens of thousands of grains from water plants, bur-reed or cattail, dominate the pollen spectrum. We believe that this was introduced with water. The large numbers of water-related pollen suggest that the general consumed broth, tea, or soup for a considerable time before death.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diet
Gastrointestinal Contents/chemistry
Mummies
Pollen
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Republic of Korea
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 150522
[Lr] Last revision date:150522
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150523
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ar.23141

  4 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320685
[Au] Autor:Neel M; Tumas HR; Marsden BW
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland , USA ; Department of Entomology, University of Maryland , USA.
[Ti] Title:Representing connectivity: quantifying effective habitat availability based on area and connectivity for conservation status assessment and recovery.
[So] Source:PeerJ;2:e622, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2167-8359
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We apply a comprehensive suite of graph theoretic metrics to illustrate how landscape connectivity can be effectively incorporated into conservation status assessments and in setting conservation objectives. These metrics allow conservation practitioners to evaluate and quantify connectivity in terms of representation, resiliency, and redundancy and the approach can be applied in spite of incomplete knowledge of species-specific biology and dispersal processes. We demonstrate utility of the graph metrics by evaluating changes in distribution and connectivity that would result from implementing two conservation plans for three endangered plant species (Erigeron parishii, Acanthoscyphus parishii var. goodmaniana, and Eriogonum ovalifolium var. vineum) relative to connectivity under current conditions. Although distributions of the species differ from one another in terms of extent and specific location of occupied patches within the study landscape, the spatial scale of potential connectivity in existing networks were strikingly similar for Erigeron and Eriogonum, but differed for Acanthoscyphus. Specifically, patches of the first two species were more regularly distributed whereas subsets of patches of Acanthoscyphus were clustered into more isolated components. Reserves based on US Fish and Wildlife Service critical habitat designation would not greatly contribute to maintain connectivity; they include 83-91% of the extant occurrences and >92% of the aerial extent of each species. Effective connectivity remains within 10% of that in the whole network for all species. A Forest Service habitat management strategy excluded up to 40% of the occupied habitat of each species resulting in both range reductions and loss of occurrences from the central portions of each species' distribution. Overall effective network connectivity was reduced to 62-74% of the full networks. The distance at which each CHMS network first became fully connected was reduced relative to the full network in Erigeron and Acanthoscyphus due to exclusion of peripheral patches, but was slightly increased for Eriogonum. Distances at which networks were sensitive to loss of connectivity due to presence non-redundant connections were affected mostly for Acanthoscyphos. Of most concern was that the range of distances at which lack of redundancy yielded high risk was much greater than in the full network. Through this in-depth example evaluating connectivity using a comprehensive suite of developed graph theoretic metrics, we establish an approach as well as provide sample interpretations of subtle variations in connectivity that conservation managers can incorporate into planning.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141017
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7717/peerj.622

  5 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24960157
[Au] Autor:James DG; Seymour L; Lauby G; Buckley K
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, Washington State University, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, 24106 N. Bunn Road, Prosser, WA 99350, USA.
[Ti] Title:Beneficial insects attracted to native flowering buckwheats (Eriogonum Michx) in central Washington.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;43(4):942-8, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs aimed at improving conservation biological control in perennial crops such as wine grapes. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to 10 species of flowering native wild buckwheat (Eriogonum spp.) in central Washington were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, the mean number per trap ranged from 48.5 (Eriogonum umbellatum) to 167.7 (Eriogonum elatum). Three Eriogonum spp. (E. elatum, Eriogonum compositum, and Eriogonum niveum) attracted significantly more beneficial insects than the lowest-ranked species. E. niveum attracted greatest numbers of bees and parasitic wasps, and E. elatum was highly attractive to predatory true bugs and beneficial flies. Blooming periods of Eriogonum spp. extended from mid April to the end of September. This study demonstrates the attraction of beneficial insects to native flowering buckwheats and suggests their potential as a component of habitat restoration strategies to improve and sustain conservation biological control in Washington viticulture.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Animal Distribution
Biological Control Agents
Eriogonum/physiology
Insecta/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Pest Control, Biological
Seasons
Species Specificity
Washington
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biological Control Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140625
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1603/EN13342

  6 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23844990
[Au] Autor:Hernandez RR; Allen MF
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA; Center for Conservation Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.
[Ti] Title:Diurnal patterns of productivity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi revealed with the Soil Ecosystem Observatory.
[So] Source:New Phytol;200(2):547-57, 2013 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are the most abundant plant symbiont and a major pathway of carbon sequestration in soils. However, their basic biology, including their activity throughout a 24-h day : night cycle, remains unknown. We employed the in situ Soil Ecosystem Observatory to quantify the rates of diurnal growth, dieback and net productivity of extra-radical AM fungi. AM fungal hyphae showed significantly different rates of growth and dieback over a period of 24 h and paralleled the circadian-driven photosynthetic oscillations observed in plants. The greatest rates (and incidences) of growth and dieback occurred between noon and 18:00 h. Growth and dieback events often occurred simultaneously and were tightly coupled with soil temperature and moisture, suggesting a rapid acclimation of the external phase of AM fungi to the immediate environment. Changes in the environmental conditions and variability of the mycorrhizosphere may alter the diurnal patterns of productivity of AM fungi, thereby modifying soil carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling and host plant success.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Glomeromycota/growth & development
Hyphae/growth & development
Mycorrhizae/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Artemisia/microbiology
Biomass
Bromus/microbiology
California
Circadian Rhythm
Ecosystem
Eriogonum/microbiology
Glomeromycota/metabolism
Hyphae/metabolism
Models, Theoretical
Mycorrhizae/metabolism
Observation
Plant Roots/microbiology
Pteridium/microbiology
Software
Soil
Symbiosis
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil)
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.12393

  7 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 21833643
[Au] Autor:Goergen E; Chambers JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV 89512, USA. egoergen@unr.edu
[Ti] Title:Facilitation and interference of seedling establishment by a native legume before and after wildfire.
[So] Source:Oecologia;168(1):199-211, 2012 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In semi-arid ecosystems, heterogeneous resources can lead to variable seedling recruitment. Existing vegetation can influence seedling establishment by modifying the resource and physical environment. We asked how a native legume, Lupinus argenteus, modifies microenvironments in unburned and burned sagebrush steppe, and if L. argenteus presence facilitates seedling establishment of native species and the non-native annual grass, Bromus tectorum. Field treatments examined mechanisms by which L. argenteus likely influences establishment: (1) live L. argenteus; (2) dead L. argenteus; (3) no L. argenteus; (4) no L. argenteus with L. argenteus litter; (5) no L. argenteus with inert litter; and (6) mock L. argenteus. Response variables included soil nitrogen, moisture, temperature, solar radiation, and seedling establishment of the natives Elymus multisetus and Eriogonum umbellatum, and non-native B. tectorum. In both unburned and burned communities, there was higher spring soil moisture, increased shade and reduced maximum temperatures under L. argenteus canopies. Adult L. argenteus resulted in greater amounts of soil nitrogen (N) only in burned sagebrush steppe, but L. argenteus litter increased soil N under both unburned and burned conditions. Although L. argenteus negatively affected emergence and survival of B. tectorum overall, its presence increased B. tectorum biomass and reproduction in unburned plots. However, L. argenteus had positive facilitative effects on size and survival of E. multisetus in both unburned and burned plots. Our study indicates that L. argenteus can facilitate seedling establishment in semi-arid systems, but net effects depend on the species examined, traits measured, and level of abiotic stress.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bromus/physiology
Eriogonum/physiology
Fires
Lupinus/physiology
Seedlings/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Artemisia/physiology
Ecosystem
Elymus/physiology
Nevada
Nitrogen/analysis
Soil/chemistry
Temperature
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil); N762921K75 (Nitrogen)
[Em] Entry month:1205
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110812
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-011-2075-0

  8 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 22140218
[Au] Autor:Riley L; McGlaughlin ME; Helenurm K
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, 57069, USA. lynn.riley01@gmail.com
[Ti] Title:Microsatellite primers for the narrowly endemic shrub Eriogonum giganteum (Polygonaceae).
[So] Source:Am J Bot;98(12):e352-5, 2011 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Microsatellite primers were designed for Eriogonum giganteum var. formosum, an endemic shrub of San Clemente Island, to investigate population structure, genetic diversity, and demographic history. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from the California Channel Island endemic Eriogonum and were screened for variability. The primers amplified one to eight alleles in the target taxon. Many primers also amplified in conspecific and congeneric (E. arborescens, E. fasciculatum, E. grande, E. latifolium, and E. parvifolium) taxa and in the closely related Chorizanthe valida. The total number of alleles per locus for all taxa screened ranged from three to 24. CONCLUSIONS: These primers will be useful for conservation genetic and evolutionary studies within the California Channel Island endemic Eriogonum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: DNA Primers/genetics
Eriogonum/genetics
Microsatellite Repeats/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: California
Genetics, Population
Heterozygote
Molecular Sequence Data
Nucleotide Motifs/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA Primers)
[Em] Entry month:1302
[Cu] Class update date: 111205
[Lr] Last revision date:111205
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:111206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3732/ajb.1100243

  9 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 21560677
[Au] Autor:Yelenik SG; Levine JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA. stephanie.yelenik@oregonstate.edu
[Ti] Title:The role of plant-soil feedbacks in driving native-species recovery.
[So] Source:Ecology;92(1):66-74, 2011 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0012-9658
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The impacts of exotic plants on soil nutrient cycling are often hypothesized to reinforce their dominance, but this mechanism is rarely tested, especially in relation to other ecological factors. In this manuscript we evaluate the influence of biogeochemically mediated plant-soil feedbacks on native shrub recovery in an invaded island ecosystem. The introduction of exotic grasses and grazing to Santa Cruz Island, California, USA, converted native shrublands (dominated by Artemisia californica and Eriogonum arborescens) into exotic-dominated grasslands (dominated by Avena barbata) over a century ago, altering nutrient-cycling regimes. To test the hypothesis that exotic grass impacts on soils alter reestablishment of native plants, we implemented a field-based soil transplant experiment in three years that varied widely in rainfall. Our results showed that growth of Avena and Artemisia seedlings was greater on soils influenced by their heterospecific competitor. Theory suggests that the resulting plant-soil feedback should facilitate the recovery of Artemisia in grasslands, although four years of monitoring showed no such recovery, despite ample seed rain. By contrast, we found that species effects on soils lead to weak to negligible feedbacks for Eriogonum arborescens, yet this shrub readily colonized the grasslands. Thus, plant-soil feedbacks quantified under natural climate and competitive conditions did not match native-plant recovery patterns. We also found that feedbacks changed with climate and competition regimes, and that these latter factors generally had stronger effects on seedling growth than species effects on soils. We conclude that even when plant-soil feedbacks influence the balance between native and exotic species, their influence may be small relative to other ecological processes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Artemisia/physiology
Ecosystem
Eriogonum/physiology
Poaceae/physiology
Soil/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: California
Introduced Species
Population Growth
Seedlings
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil)
[Em] Entry month:1106
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110513
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 29 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 20437958
[Au] Autor:Yelenik SG; Levine JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA. stephanie.yelenik@oregonstate.edu
[Ti] Title:Native shrub reestablishment in exotic annual grasslands: do ecosystem processes recover?
[So] Source:Ecol Appl;20(3):716-27, 2010 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1051-0761
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystem processes are well established, motivating numerous efforts to facilitate native-species recovery. Nonetheless, how the return of native species influences ecosystem processes and how these changes feed back to influence the recovery process are poorly understood. We examined these questions in exotic annual grasslands on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA, where the removal of nonnative herbivores has led to the recovery of the native shrubs Artemisia californica and Eriogonum arborescens. To examine the influence of shrub colonization on nutrient cycling, and the mechanisms by which these changes arise, we measured available nitrogen and phosphorus, and quantified nitrogen mineralization and litterfall rates under shrubs and grasses in the field and in experimental monoculture plots. Both native shrubs altered nitrogen cycling as they colonized the grassland, but they did so in opposite directions. Eriogonum depressed nitrogen pools and mineralization rates via large inputs of nitrogen-poor litter. In contrast Artemisia increased nitrogen and phosphorus pools and nitrogen mineralization rates. Last, to determine if shrub effects on soils favor shrubs or grasses, we conducted a nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiment in the field. Only the exotic grass was significantly limited by nitrogen. Thus the depressed nitrogen availability associated with Eriogonum colonization is more harmful to exotic grasses than to the native shrub. By contrast, the elevated nitrogen associated with recovering Artemisia favors grasses over the shrub, possibly hindering recovery of the native. Mechanistic studies of the ecosystem ,impacts of native-plant recovery are useful for managers wishing to predict which native species return ecosystem function, and whether such changes feed back to influence native recovery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Artemisia/metabolism
Ecosystem
Eriogonum/metabolism
Poaceae/metabolism
Soil/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: California
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil)
[Em] Entry month:1005
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:100505
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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