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[PMID]: 29482765
[Au] Autor:Chang CH; Tseng PT; Chen NY; Lin PC; Lin PY; Chang JP; Kuo FY; Lin J; Wu MC; Su KP
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Food Science, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Safety and tolerability of prescription omega-3 fatty acids: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
[So] Source:Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids;129:1-12, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2823
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Omega-3 fatty acids [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] are widely recommended for health promotion. Over the last decade, prescription omega-3 fatty acid products (RxOME3FAs) have been approved for medical indications. Nonetheless, there is no comprehensive analysis of safety and tolerability of RxOME3FAs so far. METHODS: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out based on searches in six electronic databases. The studies involving marketed RxOME3FA products were included, and adverse-effect data were extracted for meta-analysis. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were conducted to explore the sources of potential heterogeneity. RESULTS: Among the 21 included RCTs (total 24,460 participants; 12,750 from RxOME3FA treatment cohort and 11,710 from control cohort), there was no definite evidence of any RxOME3FA-emerging serious adverse event. Compared with the control group, RxOME3FAs were associated with more treatment-related dysgeusia (fishy taste; p = 0.011) and skin abnormalities (eruption, itching, exanthema, or eczema; p < 0.001). Besides, RxOME3FAs had mild adverse effects upon some non-lipid laboratory measurements [elevated fasting blood sugar (p = 0.005); elevated alanine transaminase (p = 0.022); elevated blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.047); decreased hemoglobin (p = 0.002); decreased hematocrit (p = 0.009)]. Subgroup analysis revealed that EPA/DHA combination products were associated with more treatment-related gastrointestinal adverse events [eructation (belching; p = 0.010); nausea (p = 0.044)] and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol elevation (p = 0.009; difference in means = 4.106mg/dL). CONCLUSION: RxOME3FAs are generally safe and well tolerated but not free of adverse effects. Post-marketing surveillance and observational studies are still necessary to identify long-term adverse effects and to confirm the safety and tolerability profiles of RxOME3FAs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29190055
[Au] Autor:Punkkinen J; Haak R; Kaartinen M; Walamies M
[Ti] Title:Help from habit reversal for supragastric belching.
[So] Source:Duodecim;132(22):2073-9, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0012-7183
[Cp] Country of publication:Finland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Supragastric belching differs from common gastric belching. It can be detected by 24-hour intra-esophageal impedance monitoring. Belching is seldom the only symptom: reflux symptom is present in 95% and dysphagia in 65% of the patients. In supragastric belching, the air does not come from the stomach but instead from the esophagus. Belching is caused by the patient him/herself swallowing air into the esophagus. This voluntary but unconscious symptom is treated by therapy in which explaining the mechanism of belching for the patient and learning of correct diaphragmatic breathing technique play a central role. Habit reversal is utilized for teaching the patient to react correctly to preemptive symptoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aerophagy/prevention & control
Eructation/prevention & control
Habits
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aerophagy/complications
Aerophagy/physiopathology
Electric Impedance
Eructation/etiology
Eructation/physiopathology
Esophagus/physiopathology
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180108
[Lr] Last revision date:180108
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28619729
[Au] Autor:Lang IM; Medda BK; Shaker R
[Ad] Address:Medical College of Wisconsin Dysphagia Institute, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin imlang@mcw.edu.
[Ti] Title:Characterization and mechanisms of the supragastric belch in the cat.
[So] Source:Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol;313(3):G220-G229, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1547
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A response in which a belch occurs without gastric involvement, i.e., the supragastric belch (SGB), has been characterized in humans. The aims of this study were to determine whether animals have an SGB and, if so, to determine its mechanisms. Studies were conducted in decerebrate cats ( = 30) with electromyographic electrodes on hyoid, pharyngeal, esophageal, and diaphragm muscles. The effects of distending different regions of the esophagus in different manners using a balloon were quantified to determine the most appropriate stimulus for activating the cat SGB. The effects of esophageal perfusion of lidocaine ( = 3), vagus nerve transection ( = 3), or esophageal acidification ( = 5) on activation of the SGB were determined. Rapid large distensions of the thoracic esophagus best activated responses similar to the human SGB, i.e., rapid inhalation followed by a belch. The rapid inhalation was associated with activation of hiatal fibers and the belch with activation of dome fibers of the diaphragm. The rapid inhalation response was independent of the belch response. Lidocaine perfusion of the esophagus blocked the belch response without blocking the rapid inhalation, HCl perfusion sensitized the esophagus to activation of both the rapid inhalation and the belch response, and vagotomy blocked both responses. We conclude that the cat has an SGB that is composed of two independent reflex responses, i.e., rapid inhalation and belch, that are mediated by the vagus nerves and tension/mucosal receptors of the esophagus and sensitized by esophageal acid exposure. We hypothesize that the SGB is a learned voluntarily activated reflex response. Rapid strong distension of the thoracic esophagus activates rapid inhalation followed by a belch, which is the sequence of responses that compose the human supragastric belch (SGB). The rapid inhalation and belch phases of the cat SGB are activated by hiatal and dome fibers of the diaphragm, respectively, and are mediated by the vagus nerves and tension/mucosal receptors of the esophagus and sensitized by esophageal acid exposure. There are many similarities between the cat and human SGB.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cats/physiology
Eructation/veterinary
Esophagus/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anesthetics, Local/pharmacology
Animals
Eructation/physiopathology
Esophagus/drug effects
Hydrochloric Acid
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lidocaine/pharmacology
Vagotomy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Local); 98PI200987 (Lidocaine); QTT17582CB (Hydrochloric Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171005
[Lr] Last revision date:171005
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170617
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.00142.2017

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[PMID]: 28132542
[Au] Autor:Turi-Kováts N; Arabadzisz H; Zsoldos A; Tomcsányi J
[Ad] Address:Kardiológia, Budai Irgalmasrendi Kórház Budapest, Árpád fejedelem u. 7., 1023.
[Ti] Title:Atípusos panasz myocardialis ischaemiában: böfögés. [Atypical complaint in myocardial ischaemia: belching].
[So] Source:Orv Hetil;158(5):183-186, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0030-6002
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:hun
[Ab] Abstract:While educating non-medical personnel on acute coronary syndrome we often emphasize the importance of early recognition and urgent transfer to acute cardiac center of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Aside from typical symptoms of chest tightness and pain radiating to shoulder, arm and jaw, angina often presents with atypical, non-cardiac complaints. These symptoms, often suggesting gastrointestinal problems, can sometimes mislead even the most experienced physicians. We would like to present the case of an 83-year-old woman with several decades long history of ischaemic heart disease, who recently developed a new anginal symptom: lound, uncontrollable belching. Within the past eight months she was admitted four times with complaints of belching followed by chest pain. Even though initially it was thought as an incidental finding, in all four cases she had proven coronary occlusion requiring cardiac intervention. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(5), 183-186.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coronary Occlusion/diagnosis
Eructation/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged, 80 and over
Chest Pain/etiology
Coronary Occlusion/complications
Female
Humans
Laryngopharyngeal Reflux/etiology
Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170803
[Lr] Last revision date:170803
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/650.2017.30636

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[PMID]: 28112426
[Au] Autor:Tan VP; Liu KS; Lam FY; Hung IF; Yuen MF; Leung WK
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong.
[Ti] Title:Randomised clinical trial: rifaximin versus placebo for the treatment of functional dyspepsia.
[So] Source:Aliment Pharmacol Ther;45(6):767-776, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2036
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Gut dysbiosis may contribute to pain and bloating in patients with functional gastrointestinal disease. AIMS: To determine if treatment with rifaximin would improve the symptoms of functional dyspepsia in Chinese patients in a double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Consecutive subjects with a diagnosis of functional dyspepsia as per the Rome III criteria were randomised to receive rifaximin 400 mg or placebo, all taken three times daily for 2 weeks. The investigators and study subjects were blinded to the treatment allocation. Subjects were followed up for 8 weeks. The primary end point was adequate relief of global dyspeptic symptoms (GDS). Secondary endpoints were relief of individual dyspeptic symptoms. RESULTS: Eighty-six subjects were recruited. At week 8, there were significantly more subjects in the rifaximin than in the placebo group who experienced adequate relief of GDS (78% vs. 52%, P = 0.02). A trend favouring rifaximin group was also noted in the preceding 4 weeks. Rifaximin was also superior to placebo in providing adequate relief of belching and post-prandial fullness/bloating (PPF) in subjects at week 4. Subgroup analysis revealed that female subjects had more significant response to rifaximin treatment (adequate relief of GDS at week 4: 76% vs. 42%, P = 0.006; week 8: 79% vs. 47%, P = 0.008), as well as improvements in their belching and PPF at week 4. The incidences of adverse effects were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with 2 weeks of rifaximin led to adequate relief of global dyspeptic symptoms, belching and post-prandial fullness/bloating in subjects with functional dyspepsia. The difference was more marked in females. (clinicaltrials.org NCT01643083).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dyspepsia/drug therapy
Dyspepsia/epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use
Rifamycins/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Double-Blind Method
Dyspepsia/diagnosis
Eructation/diagnosis
Eructation/drug therapy
Eructation/epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Agents/pharmacology
Hong Kong/epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain/diagnosis
Pain/drug therapy
Pain/epidemiology
Placebo Effect
Postprandial Period/drug effects
Postprandial Period/physiology
Rifamycins/pharmacology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Gastrointestinal Agents); 0 (Rifamycins); L36O5T016N (rifaximin)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170612
[Lr] Last revision date:170612
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170124
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apt.13945

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[PMID]: 27852385
[Au] Autor:Cheng H; Hu FL; Sheng JQ; An HJ; Xu L; Liu FX; Li Y; Hao Q; Zheng PY; Lu GF; Cao ZQ; Wang YP
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034, China.
[Ti] Title:[Jinghuaweikang capsules combined with furazolidone-based triple or quadruple therapy as the rescue treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection: a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi;96(40):3206-3212, 2016 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:0376-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To explore the efficacy of Jinhuaweikang capsules plus furazolidone-based triple or quadruple therapy as the rescue treatment for ( . ) infection. This is a prospective randomized controlled multicenter clinical trial. Patients with chronic gastritis from . infection in whom eradication treatment failed were recruited from 6 hospitals. All patients were divided into 4 groups using stratified randomization: group A1 (PAFJ), receiving pantoprazole 40 mg+ amoxicillin 1 000 mg+ furazolidone 100 mg+ Jinghuaweikang 3 capsules, twice a day for 10 d (d1-10); group A2, PAFJ therapy as in group A1, followed by Jinghuaweikang 3 capsules twice a day for 18 d (d11-28); group B1 (PAFB), receiving pantoprazole 40 mg+ amoxicillin 1 000 mg+ furazolidone 100 mg+ bismuth potassium citrate 220 mg, twice a day for 10 d (d1-10); group B2, PAFB therapy as in group B1, followed by Jinghuaweikang 3 capsules twice a day for 18 d (d11-28). At least 28 days after the end of treatment, all patients underwent C urea breath test for assessment of . eradication. A total of 357 patients, 145 males and 212 females, were recruited, including 90 in group A1, 88 in group A2, 89 in group B1, and 90 in group B2. The eradication rates of . in groups A1 and A2 were 76.1%(67/88)and 79.6%(70/88) in per-protocol (PP) analysis, 74.4%(67/90) and 79.6%(70/88)in intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis; the rates in groups B1 and B2 were as 85.9%(73/85) and 92.1%(81/88) in PP analysis, 82.0%(73/89) and 90.0%(81/90)in ITT analysis. There were statistically significant differences in PP eradication rates among the 4 groups ( =0.020); there was statistically significant difference between groups A1 and B2, and also between groups A2 and B2 ( =0.003, 0.020), but not between groups A1/A2 and B1 ( >0.05), nor between groups B1 and B2 ( >0.05). No statistically significant differences in ITT eradication rates were found among the 4 groups ( >0.05). The improvement of belching and poor appetite for patients in groups A2 and B2 was better than those in groups A1 and B1. The efficacy of Jinghuaweikang capsules plus furazolidone-based quadruple therapy is superior to combination with furazolidone-based triple therapy as the rescue treatment of . and superior to bismuth-containing quadruple therapy. Extending administration of Jinghuaweikang capsules to 28 days may better improve symptoms of indigestion.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Helicobacter pylori
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles
Amoxicillin
Antacids
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bismuth
Breath Tests
Capsules
Drug Therapy, Combination
Eructation
Furazolidone
Gastritis
Helicobacter Infections
Humans
Prospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles); 0 (Antacids); 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Capsules); 5J9CPU3RE0 (Furazolidone); 804826J2HU (Amoxicillin); D8TST4O562 (pantoprazole); U015TT5I8H (Bismuth)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171011
[Lr] Last revision date:171011
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0376-2491.2016.40.002

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[PMID]: 27782892
[Au] Autor:Bastürk A; Artan R; Yilmaz A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey. drahmetbasturk@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of synbiotic, probiotic, and prebiotic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome in children: A randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Turk J Gastroenterol;27(5):439-443, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2148-5607
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an important health problem that presents serious social burdens and high costs. Our study investigated the efficacy of synbiotic (Bifidobacterium lactis B94 with inulin), probiotic (B. lactis B94), and prebiotic (inulin) treatment for IBS in a pediatric age group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was randomized, double-blind, controlled, and prospective in design and included 71 children between the ages of 4 and 16 years who were diagnosed with IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The first group received synbiotic treatment [5×109 colony forming units (CFU) of B. lactis B94 and 900 mg inulin]; the second group received probiotic treatment (5×109 CFU B. lactis B94), and the third group received prebiotic treatment (900 mg inulin) twice daily for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Probiotic treatment improved belching-abdominal fullness (p<0.001), bloating after meals (p=0.016), and constipation (p=0.031), and synbiotic treatment improved belching-abdominal fullness (p=<0.001), bloating after meals (p=0.004), constipation (p=0.021), and mucus in the feces (p=0.021). The synbiotic group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with full recovery than the prebiotic group (39.1% vs. 12.5%, p=0.036). CONCLUSION: Administration of synbiotics and probiotics resulted in significant improvements in initial complaints when compared to prebiotics. Additionally, there was a significantly higher number of patients with full recovery from IBS symptoms in the synbiotic group than in the prebiotic group. Therefore, the twice daily administration of synbiotics is suggested for the treatment of children with IBS.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Irritable Bowel Syndrome/therapy
Prebiotics/administration & dosage
Probiotics/administration & dosage
Synbiotics/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Bifidobacterium animalis
Child
Child, Preschool
Double-Blind Method
Eructation/etiology
Eructation/therapy
Female
Flatulence/etiology
Flatulence/therapy
Humans
Inulin/administration & dosage
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/microbiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Prebiotics); 9005-80-5 (Inulin)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171003
[Lr] Last revision date:171003
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161027
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5152/tjg.2016.16301

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[PMID]: 27648298
[Au] Autor:Triadafilopoulos G
[Ad] Address:Silicon Valley Neurogastroenterology and Motility Center, Mountain View, CA, USA; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
[Ti] Title:Utility of wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath testing in the evaluation of patients with chronic functional bloating.
[So] Source:BMJ Open Gastroenterol;3(1):e000110, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2054-4774
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The precise aetiology of chronic bloating remains poorly understood and underlying gastroparesis, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and colonic inertia may, individually or collectively, play a role. AIMS: In this retrospective cohort analysis of symptomatic patients with chronic persistent bloating, we determined the clinical utility of wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath test in further defining the underlying aetiology for functional bloating. METHODS: Consecutive patients with chronic bloating underwent clinical assessment, wireless motility capsule testing and lactulose breath testing using standard protocols. RESULTS: 52 patients qualified for inclusion in this analysis, fulfilling Rome III criteria for functional bloating. Most patients (54%) had an abnormal wireless motility capsule study; of those, 11.5% had evidence of gastroparesis, 7.7% had small bowel transit delay, 15.8% had colonic inertia, 3.8% had delayed gastric and small bowel transit, 5.6% had combined gastric and colonic transit delay, 3.8% had delayed small bowel and colonic transit, and 5.6% had delayed gastric, small bowel and colon transit times. Using clinical questionnaires the median scores for bloating, constipation and eructation were not significantly different. Neither constipation nor eructation was specific to gastroparesis or colonic inertia but bloating was numerically more prevalent and severe in patients with delayed small bowel transit. 40% of patients had positive lactulose breath test but had no distinguishing clinical characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic functional bloating may reflect underlying gastroparesis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or colonic inertia. Wireless motility capsule and lactulose breath test are useful in the assessment of patients with bloating and should be considered during evaluation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160921
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmjgast-2016-000110

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[PMID]: 27492915
[Au] Autor:Cotter TG; Gurney M; Loftus CG
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
[Ti] Title:Gas and Bloating-Controlling Emissions: A Case-Based Review for the Primary Care Provider.
[So] Source:Mayo Clin Proc;91(8):1105-13, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1942-5546
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The evaluation of the patient with gas and bloating can be complex and the treatment extremely challenging. In this article, a simplified approach to the history and relevant physical examination is presented and applied in a case-oriented manner, suitable for application in the primary care setting.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diet
Eructation
Flatulence
Gastric Dilatation
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdominal Pain/etiology
Abdominal Pain/physiopathology
Adult
Aerophagy/complications
Aerophagy/etiology
Comorbidity
Constipation/complications
Diagnosis, Differential
Diet/adverse effects
Diet/standards
Endoscopy, Digestive System
Eructation/diagnosis
Eructation/etiology
Eructation/therapy
Female
Flatulence/diagnosis
Flatulence/etiology
Flatulence/therapy
Gastric Dilatation/diagnosis
Gastric Dilatation/etiology
Gastric Dilatation/therapy
Gastroparesis/complications
Gastroparesis/physiopathology
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/diagnosis
Male
Medical History Taking/methods
Medical History Taking/standards
Middle Aged
Pelvic Floor Disorders/complications
Postprandial Period/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170526
[Lr] Last revision date:170526
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160806
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27330988
[Au] Autor:Popkirov S; Grönheit W; Wellmer J
[Ad] Address:Ruhr-Epileptology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Knappschaftskrankenhaus Bochum, Ruhr-University Bochum, In der Schornau 23-25, 44892 Bochum, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Paroxysmal belching: Epileptic or nonepileptic?
[So] Source:Epilepsy Behav Case Rep;5:11-2, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2213-3232
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The prevalence and localizing value of ictal belching are yet unknown. We present the case of a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy with simple and complex partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures. One presumed seizure type comprised frequent episodes of repetitive belching. Video-EEG monitoring during these attacks showed no ictal changes. The belching episodes were inducible and terminable through suggestion. The diagnosis of excessive supragastric belching, a previously described psychogenic condition, was made.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160623
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.ebcr.2015.12.002


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