Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Erysipelothrix and Infections [Words]
References found : 728 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 73 go to page                         

  1 / 728 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28761204
[Au] Autor:Balootaki PA; Amin M; Haghparasti F; Rokhbakhsh-Zamin F
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Kerman Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kerman, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Isolation and Detection of and Its Distribution in Humans and Animals by Phenotypical and Molecular Methods in Ahvaz-Iran in 2015.
[So] Source:Iran J Med Sci;42(4):377-383, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0253-0716
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: ( ) is generally transmitted into the gastrointestinal tract of animals by the intake of contaminated food or water and causes great economic loss in agriculture worldwide. Some of the spp. are the causative agents of erysipeloid, which is an occupational infection in humans. The aim of the present study was to isolate from animals as well as the hands of the butchers working in Ahvaz, Iran, and to determine their susceptibility to antibiotics. METHODS: Totally, 150 samples were taken from slaughterhouse workers, fishermen, and livers and hearts of sheep and calves by the swabbing method. Phenotypical methods and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used for the isolation and identification of . The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion protocol described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. RESULTS: Out of the 150 samples examined via phenotypical and biochemical tests, 16 samples were positive as putative . twelve cases out of the 16 putative . were confirmed by PCR. The tested isolates were highly sensitive to the antibiotics used. The results of the sensitivity and specificity of PCR revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of indirect PCR were higher than those of direct PCR. CONCLUSION: is widely distributed on seafood and presents as a commensal pathogen in nature and animals. Infection with this microorganism should be emphasized because it is a rare organism causing severe infections such as infectious endocarditis and polyarthritis following localized infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170803
[Lr] Last revision date:170803
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  2 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28720292
[Au] Autor:McNeil M; Gerber PF; Thomson J; Williamson S; Opriessnig T
[Ad] Address:The Roslin Institute and The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Serotypes and Spa types of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates from British pigs (1987 to 2015).
[So] Source:Vet J;225:13-15, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2971
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erysipelothrix spp. cause a range of clinical signs in pigs and at least 28 different Erysipelothrix spp. serotypes have been identified. In this study, 128 isolates of Erysipelothrix spp. from pigs in Great Britain from 1987 to 2015 were characterised by serotyping and multiplex real time PCR assays targeting the surface protective antigen (Spa) and the main genotypes (Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Erysipelothrix tonsillarum and Erysipelothrix spp. strain 2). All 128 British isolates were characterised as E. rhusiopathiae and were classified as serotypes 1a (n=21), 1b (n=17), 2 (n=75), 5 (n=2), 9 (n=2), 10 (n=2), 11 (n=4) and 15 (n=1), while four isolates were untypeable. All isolates were positive for the spa A gene. Serotypes 1a, 1b and 2 constituted 88.3% of the isolates; current serotype 2 based vaccines should protect against these isolates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erysipelothrix Infections/microbiology
Erysipelothrix/classification
Serogroup
Swine Diseases/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
Bacterial Vaccines/therapeutic use
Erysipelothrix/genetics
Erysipelothrix/immunology
Erysipelothrix Infections/prevention & control
Genotype
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary
Serotyping/veterinary
Sus scrofa/microbiology
Swine
United Kingdom
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, Bacterial); 0 (Bacterial Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170720
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28355191
[Au] Autor:Dolgin E
[Ti] Title:Climate change: As the ice melts.
[So] Source:Nature;543(7647):S54-S55, 2017 03 29.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Animals, Wild
Beluga Whale/parasitology
Borrelia burgdorferi/isolation & purification
Erysipelothrix/isolation & purification
Global Warming/statistics & numerical data
Toxoplasma/isolation & purification
Zoonoses/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Wild/microbiology
Animals, Wild/parasitology
Animals, Wild/virology
Arctic Regions/epidemiology
Canada/epidemiology
Diet
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/epidemiology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne/virology
Humans
Ice Cover
Incidence
Indians, North American
Lyme Disease/epidemiology
Lyme Disease/microbiology
Public Health/methods
Public Health/trends
Siberia/epidemiology
Toxoplasma/genetics
Toxoplasmosis/epidemiology
Toxoplasmosis/parasitology
Toxoplasmosis/prevention & control
Uncertainty
Zoonoses/parasitology
Zoonoses/prevention & control
Zoonoses/transmission
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170808
[Lr] Last revision date:170808
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170330
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/543S54a

  4 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28327178
[Au] Autor:Zhu W; Zhang Q; Li J; Wei Y; Cai C; Liu L; Xu Z; Jin M
[Ad] Address:Animal Infectious Disease Unit, National State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China.
[Ti] Title:Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acts as an adhesin in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae adhesion to porcine endothelial cells and as a receptor in recruitment of host fibronectin and plasminogen.
[So] Source:Vet Res;48(1):16, 2017 Mar 21.
[Is] ISSN:1297-9716
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is the causative agent of animal erysipelas and human erysipeloid. Previous studies suggested glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays a role in the pathogenesis of E. rhusiopathiae infection. We studied E. rhusiopathiae GAPDH interactions with pig vascular endothelial cells, fibronectin, and plasminogen. Recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) was successfully obtained, and it was shown that it plays a role in E. rhusiopathiae adhesion to pig vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, rGAPDH could bind fibronectin and plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that a moonlighting protein plays a role in pathogenesis of E. rhusiopathiae infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Adhesion
Endothelial Cells/microbiology
Erysipelothrix Infections/microbiology
Erysipelothrix
Fibronectins/metabolism
Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases/metabolism
Plasminogen/metabolism
Swine Diseases/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Flow Cytometry/veterinary
Swine
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fibronectins); 9001-91-6 (Plasminogen); EC 1.2.1.- (Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170928
[Lr] Last revision date:170928
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170323
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13567-017-0421-x

  5 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28206705
[Au] Autor:Tan EM; Marcelin JR; Adeel N; Lewis RJ; Enzler MJ; Tosh PK
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bloodstream infection - A 22-year experience at Mayo Clinic, Minnesota.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;64(7):e65-e72, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a facultatively anaerobic Gram-positive bacillus found mostly in swine, fish and sheep. E. rhusiopathiae classically causes cutaneous eruptions in butchers, fish handlers and veterinarians. Based solely on case reports, 90% of E. rhusiopathiae bloodstream infections (BSI) have been associated with infective endocarditis (IE). To assess the true frequency of IE in E. rhusiopathiae BSI as well as other clinical associations, we performed a retrospective cohort analysis of E. rhusiopathiae BSI at Mayo Clinic. This is a single-centre, retrospective study conducted between 1/1/1994 and 20/6/2016 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, E. rhusiopathiae BSI, anti-microbial susceptibilities, incidence of IE, patient comorbidities, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and duration of antibiotics. Five cases of E. rhusiopathiae BSI were identified. Risk factors included animal exposures, immunosuppression, diabetes and kidney disease. All cases involved penicillin-sensitive strains and high-grade BSI. Four cases showed no signs of IE on transesophageal echocardiogram. All patients recovered fully with intravenous antibiotics. Our retrospective review illustrates that E. rhusiopathiae can cause invasive BSI in the absence of IE and that the previously reported 90% association between BSI and IE may be overestimated due to reporting bias. E. rhusiopathiae should be suspected in any patient with Gram-positive bacilli in blood cultures and the aforementioned risk factors. A limitation of our study was the low sample size, and future studies may involve multicentre collaborations and the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or serologic testing to increase the number of diagnoses..
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia/microbiology
Erysipelothrix Infections/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia/epidemiology
Erysipelothrix
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Retrospective Studies
Zoonoses
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12348

  6 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28110776
[Au] Autor:Zhu W; Wu C; Kang C; Cai C; Jin M
[Ad] Address:Animal Infectious Disease Unit, National State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China.
[Ti] Title:Development of a duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains.
[So] Source:Vet Microbiol;199:108-110, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2542
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The differentiation of vaccine strains from wild type strains is important for disease control. A duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains was developed based on the DNA polymerase IV gene. This duplex PCR was sensitive and specific. The detection results were coincident with that of a single nucleotide polymorphisms based PCR but the detection process was more rapid. In conclusion, this duplex PCR was a useful tool for Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections' differential diagnosis in China.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erysipelothrix Infections/microbiology
Erysipelothrix/classification
Erysipelothrix/genetics
Molecular Typing/veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bacterial Vaccines/microbiology
China
DNA Polymerase beta/genetics
DNA, Bacterial/genetics
Erysipelothrix Infections/diagnosis
Sensitivity and Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Vaccines); 0 (DNA, Bacterial); EC 2.7.7.- (DNA Polymerase beta)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170227
[Lr] Last revision date:170227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170124
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28056818
[Au] Autor:Hofseth K; Dalen H; Kibsgaard L; Nebb S; Kümmel A; Mehl A
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a case report on an occupational pathogen.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;17(1):12, 2017 Jan 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an established animal pathogen, which may cause infections in humans. It is a gram-positive rod and found in the tonsils or the digestive tracts of animals. The bacterium is occupationally related, as usually only people with frequent animal contacts are infected. We report a case of a patient who was admitted with an infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection due to E. rhusiopathiae, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of a tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation associated with this bacterium. CASE PRESENTATION: A 52-year old Norwegian man, who worked with transportation of swine cadavers, was admitted to the local hospital with sepsis and unknown focus of infection. A few days earlier he had an injury to the skin of one of his fingers that later proved to be infected with E. rhusiopathiae. There were no other causes for his symptoms than the infectious tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation. The infection resolved on treatment with antibiotics and surgery. A transoesophageal echocardiogram was performed to exclude endocarditis, which may be associated with this pathogen. CONCLUSIONS: This case report highlights the importance of clinicians being aware of this bacterium, and we describe risk factors for infection, differences in the clinical manifestations of the disease, challenges with diagnosing the bacterium and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Recommended treatment is appropriate antibiotic therapy and adequate debridement and surgical drainage of the tendon sheath.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia/microbiology
Erysipelothrix Infections/diagnosis
Erysipelothrix/isolation & purification
Occupational Diseases/diagnosis
Tenosynovitis/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Endocarditis/drug therapy
Endocarditis/microbiology
Erysipelothrix Infections/blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases/microbiology
Risk Factors
Swine
Swine Diseases/microbiology
Tenosynovitis/blood
Zoonoses/diagnosis
Zoonoses/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170705
[Lr] Last revision date:170705
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170107
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-016-2102-1

  8 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27977547
[Au] Autor:Alawdah LS; Campbell JN; Pollock N; Watnick PI
[Ad] Address:From the *Division of Infectious Disease, Boston Children's Hospital, †Infectious Diseases Diagnostic Laboratory, Boston Children's Hospital, and ‡Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Suppurative Arthritis in a 12-year-old Boy After an Unusual Fresh Water Exposure.
[So] Source:Pediatr Infect Dis J;36(4):431-433, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0987
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who experienced recurrent suppurative arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint after near simultaneous exposure to a frog, a dog bite and lake water. Anaerobic cultures of synovial fluid obtained during operative debridement grew small round gray colonies ultimately identified as Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae by routine laboratory tests and mass spectrometry.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthritis, Infectious
Bites and Stings
Erysipelothrix Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Anura
Child
Debridement
Dogs
Fresh Water
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170626
[Lr] Last revision date:170626
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000001461

  9 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27873166
[Au] Autor:Asimaki E; Nolte O; Overesch G; Strahm C
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Rorschacher Str. 95, 9007, St. Gallen, Switzerland. helenasimaki@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A dangerous hobby? Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia most probably acquired from freshwater aquarium fish handling.
[So] Source:Infection;45(4):557-562, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0973
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive rod that occurs widely in nature and is best known in veterinary medicine for causing swine erysipelas. In humans, infections are rare and mainly considered as occupationally acquired zoonosis. A case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia most likely associated with home freshwater aquarium handling is reported. The route of transmission was probably a cut with the dorsal fin of a dead pet fish. A short review of clinical presentations, therapeutic considerations and pitfalls of E. rhusiopathiae infections in humans is presented.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 170801
[Lr] Last revision date:170801
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s15010-016-0966-z

  10 / 728 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 27821381
[Au] Autor:Capucchio MT; Lanteri G; Marino F; Biasibetti E; Reale S; Guarda F; Macrì B
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Grugliasco, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Myocardial infarctions due to Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae infection in an adult sheep.
[So] Source:Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd;158(11):765-767, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0036-7281
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erysipelothrix Infections/physiopathology
Erysipelothrix/isolation & purification
Myocardial Infarction/veterinary
Sheep Diseases/microbiology
Sheep Diseases/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Erysipelothrix Infections/microbiology
Female
Myocardial Infarction/etiology
Myocardial Infarction/microbiology
Sheep
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170214
[Lr] Last revision date:170214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161109
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 73 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information