Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29408872
[Au] Autor:Gupta N; Srivastava N; Bhagyawant SS
[Ad] Address:School of Studies in Biotechnology, Jiwaji University, Gwalior, India.
[Ti] Title:Vicilin-A major storage protein of mungbean exhibits antioxidative potential, antiproliferative effects and ACE inhibitory activity.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191265, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enzymatic hydrolysates of different food proteins demonstrate health benefits. Search for diet related food protein hydrolysates is therefore of interest within the scope of functional foods. Mungbean is one of the popular foods in India because of rich protein source. In this study, mungbean vicilin protein (MBVP) was enzymatically hydrolysed by alcalase and trypsin under optimal conditions. We have studied the antioxidant, antiproliferative and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of mungbean vicilin protein hydrolysate (MBVPH) vis-a-vis alcalase-generated mungbean vicilin protein hydrolysate (AMBVPH) and trypsin-generated mungbean vicilin protein hydrolysate (TMBVPH). The results showed that MBVPH exhibited higher antioxidant potential, ACE inhibitory and antiproliferative activities than MBVP. The alcalase treated hydrolysate displayed highest ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 0.32 mg protein/ml. The MBVP showed significant antiproliferative activity against both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells at the doses between 0.2-1.0 mg/ml. The data suggested that MBVPH can be utilized as physiologically active functional foods with sufficient antihypertensive activity. The results indicate that mungbean can be utilized as a rich resource of functional foods.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology
Antioxidants/pharmacology
Cell Proliferation/drug effects
Fabaceae/metabolism
Plant Proteins/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Free Radical Scavengers/metabolism
Humans
Rabbits
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Free Radical Scavengers); 0 (Plant Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191265

  2 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520789
[Au] Autor:Sousa-Baena MS; Lohmann LG; Hernandes-Lopes J; Sinha NR
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Botânica, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, 05508-090, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The molecular control of tendril development in angiosperms.
[So] Source:New Phytol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The climbing habit has evolved multiple times during the evolutionary history of angiosperms. Plants evolved various strategies for climbing, such as twining stems, tendrils and hooks. Tendrils are threadlike organs with the ability to twine around other structures through helical growth; they may be derived from a variety of structures, such as branches, leaflets and inflorescences. The genetic capacity to grow as a tendrilled climber existed in some of the earliest land plants; however, the underlying molecular basis of tendril development has been studied in only a few taxa. Here, we summarize what is known about the molecular basis of tendril development in model and candidate model species from key tendrilled families, that is, Fabaceae, Vitaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Passifloraceae and Bignoniaceae. Studies on tendril molecular genetics and development show the molecular basis of tendril formation and ontogenesis is diverse, even when tendrils have the same ontogenetic origin, for example leaflet-derived tendrils in Fabaceae and Bignoniaceae. Interestingly, all tendrils perform helical growth during contact-induced coiling, indicating that such ability is not correlated with their ontogenetic origin or phylogenetic history. Whether the same genetic networks are involved during helical growth in diverse tendrils still remains to be investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.15073

  3 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516422
[Au] Autor:Sarma B; Bhattacharyya PR; Bhuyan M
[Ad] Address:Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-NEIST Campus, Jorhat, India.
[Ti] Title:Effect of natural gas flaring upon the butterfly, Eurema hecabe (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and its host plant, Cassia tora (Fabales: Fabaceae) in two group gathering stations of Assam, India: an approach of environmental monitoring.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Apart from other pollutants, flaring of natural gas adds carbon dioxide into the environment and changes the atmospheric composition, including temperature and humidity. As a major gaseous product, carbon dioxide changes plant structural components as well as herbivores, i.e., insect by dilution of nitrogen under such circumstances. Present analysis demonstrated the impact of gas flaring upon adjoining biota especially Eurema hecabe butterfly and its host plant, Cassia tora in some wells (group gathering stations) of Assam, India. Analysis, pertaining from the current investigation, documented higher carbon dioxide as well as temperature in the studied flaring sites. Apart from this, reduction of leaf nitrogen, SLA, and chlorophyll with increasing in LDMC, thickness, and carbon in the studied plant as well as poor developmental rate, RGR, ECD with high RCR in insect indicated severe impact of flaring in those areas. Simulation studies with different concentration of CO in open top chamber on the plant and butterfly also revealed similar trend of results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-018-1543-z

  4 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29182713
[Au] Autor:Forrester NJ; Ashman TL
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:The direct effects of plant polyploidy on the legume-rhizobia mutualism.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;121(2):209-220, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Polyploidy is known to significantly alter plant genomes, phenotypes and interactions with the abiotic environment, yet the impacts of polyploidy on plant-biotic interactions are less well known. A particularly important plant-biotic interaction is the legume-rhizobia mutualism, in which rhizobia fix atmospheric nitrogen in exchange for carbon provided by legume hosts. This mutualism regulates nutrient cycles in natural ecosystems and provides nitrogen to agricultural environments. Despite the ecological, evolutionary and agricultural importance of plant polyploidy and the legume-rhizobia mutualism, it is not yet fully understood whether plant polyploidy directly alters mutualism traits or the consequences on plant growth. Scope: The aim was to propose a conceptual framework to understand how polyploidy might directly enhance the quantity and quality of rhizobial symbionts hosted by legume plants, resulting in increased host access to fixed nitrogen (N). Mechanistic hypotheses have been devised to examine how polyploidy can directly alter traits that impact the quantity (e.g. nodule number, nodule size, terminal bacteroid differentiation) and quality of symbionts (e.g. nodule environment, partner choice, host sanctions). To evaluate these hypotheses, an exhaustive review of studies testing the effects of plant polyploidy on the mutualism was conducted. In doing so, overall trends were synthesized, highlighting the limited understanding of the mechanisms that underlie variation in results achieved thus far, revealing striking gaps in knowledge and uncovering areas ripe for future research. Conclusions: Plant polyploidy can immediately alter nodule size, N fixation rate and the identity of rhizobial symbionts hosted by polyploid legumes, but many of the mechanistic hypotheses proposed here, such as bacteroid number and enhancements of the nodule environment, remain unexplored. Although current evidence supports a role of plant polyploidy in enhancing key aspects of the legume-rhizobia mutualism, the underlying mechanisms and effects on host benefit from the mutualism remain unresolved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx121

  5 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511776
[Au] Autor:Saba Rahim M; Sharma H; Parveen A; Roy JK
[Ad] Address:National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute (NABI), Mohali, India.
[Ti] Title:Trait Mapping Approaches Through Association Analysis in Plants.
[So] Source:Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:0724-6145
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previously, association mapping (AM) methodology was used to unravel genetic complications in animal science by measuring the complex traits for candidate and non-candidate genes. Nowadays, this statistical approach is widely used to clarify the complexity in plant breeding program-based genome-wide breeding strategies, marker development, and diversity analysis. This chapter is particularly focused on methodologies with limitations and provides an overview of AM models and software used up to now. Association or linkage disequilibrium mapping has become a very popular method for discovering candidate and non-candidate genes and confirmation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) on various parts of the genome and in marker-assisted selection for breeding. Previously, various QTL investigations were carried out for different plants exclusively by linkage mapping. To help to understand the basics of modern molecular genetic techniques, in this chapter we summarize previous studies done on different crops. AM offers high-resolution power when there is large genotypic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium (LD) for the germplasm being investigated. The benefits of AM, compared with traditional QTL mapping, include a relatively detailed mapping resolution and a far less time-consuming approach since no mapping populations need to be generated. The advancements in genotyping and computational techniques have encouraged the use of AM. AM provides a fascinating approach for genetic investigation of QTLs, due to its resolution and the possibility to study the various genomic areas at the same time without construction of mapping populations. In this chapter we also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of AM, especially in the dicotyledonous crops Fabaceae and Solanaceae, with various genome-size reproductive strategies (clonal vs. sexual), and statistical models. The main objective of this chapter is to highlight the uses of association genetics in major and minor crop species that have trouble being analyzed for dissection of complex traits by identification of the factor responsible for controlling the effect of trait. Graphical Abstract.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/10_2017_50

  6 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29389969
[Au] Autor:Pometti C; Bessega C; Cialdella A; Ewens M; Saidman B; Vilardi J
[Ad] Address:Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Genética de Especies Leñosas (GEEL), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Spatial genetic structure within populations and management implications of the South American species Acacia aroma (Fabaceae).
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192107, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The identification of factors that structure intraspecific diversity is of particular interest for biological conservation and restoration ecology. All rangelands in Argentina are currently experiencing some form of deterioration or desertification. Acacia aroma is a multipurpose species widely distributed throughout this country. In this study, we used the AFLP technique to study genetic diversity, population genetic structure, and fine-scale spatial genetic structure in 170 individuals belonging to 6 natural Argentinean populations. With 401 loci, the mean heterozygosity (HE = 0.2) and the mean percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL = 62.1%) coefficients indicated that the genetic variation is relatively high in A. aroma. The analysis with STRUCTURE showed that the number of clusters (K) was 3. With Geneland analysis, the number of clusters was K = 4, sharing the same grouping as STRUCTURE but dividing one population into two groups. When studying SGS, significant structure was detected in 3 of 6 populations. The neighbourhood size in these populations ranged from 15.2 to 64.3 individuals. The estimated gene dispersal distance depended on the effective population density and disturbance level and ranged from 45 to 864 m. The combined results suggest that a sampling strategy, which aims to maintain a considerable part of the variability contained in natural populations sampled here, would include at least 3 units defined by the clusters analyses that exhibit particular genetic properties. Moreover, the current SGS analysis suggests that within the wider management units/provinces, seed collection from A. aroma should target trees separated by a minimum distance of 50 m but preferably 150 m to reduce genetic relatedness among seeds from different trees.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192107

  7 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501844
[Au] Autor:Ricardo LM; Dias BM; Mügge FLB; Leite VV; Brandão MGL
[Ad] Address:Centro Especializado em Plantas Aromáticas, Medicinais e Tóxicas (CEPLAMT), Museu de História Natural e Jardim Botânico, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicamentos e Assistência Farmacêutica, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal
[Ti] Title:Evidence of traditionality of Brazilian medicinal plants: the case studies of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville (barbatimão) barks and Copaifera spp. (copaíba) oleoresin in wound healing.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the potential of plants used in secular traditional medicine and considers this an important source of evidence to assess their effectiveness and safety. Brazil is rich in biodiversity and traditional uses based on the Amerindian culture. However, many processes started with the arrival of the Portuguese in the year 1500. The sucessive economic cycles, for example, led to destruction of native vegetation and an intense cultural erosion. As a consequence, the information about the use of plants in the past centuries are dispersed and without interpretation. In this study a methodology to evidence the traditionality of Brazilian plants was demonstrated using data about barbatimão barks (Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville - Fabaceae) and Copaiba oleoresin (Copaifera spp. - Fabaceae) in wound healing, was established. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data about use of the plants were recovered from bibliography published between 1576 and 2011. The books (101) were classified using weights, considering the date of publication and the source of Information. Older books that describe primary information received weight 10, while books written more recently and with secondary information received weight 0.4. A score for each category of medicinal use was calculated based on the books weights and the frequency of citation. A review about the current use of both plants was also performed from ethnobotanical studies published in journals. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The traditional secular use of barks of barbatimão and oleoresin of copaiba to treat wounds was confirmed based on the historic bibliographic research. The most frequent use of barbatimão in a timeline of 500 years of Brazil's history, was as astringent, whereas for copaíba was as healing of skin and mucosal lesions. The continuous and curent use of these plants to treat wounds, confirmed by recent ethnobotanical studies, is an indicative of the resilience of these remedies and their effectiveness. CONCLUSION: The use of preparations containing barbatimão barks and copaiba oleoresin can be considered effective in the treatment of wounds. Nonetheless, it is necessary to improve the quality of the formulas as established by WHO.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29447950
[Au] Autor:Maleki T; Akhani H
[Ad] Address:Halophytes and C(4) Plants Research Laboratory, Department of Plant Science, School of Biology, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal studies in Baluchi tribes: A case study in Mt. Taftan, southeastern Iran.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;217:163-177, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOBOTANICAL RELEVANCE: From ancient times, the applied use of herbs has been common among indigenous people throughout the world. The present survey is a regional ethnobotanical study of Baluchi tribes living in the Mt. Taftan area, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran. The aim of this study was to document all traditional knowledge and analyze the medicinal plants used in area and also to identify significant plant species for future pharmacological study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Local knowledge was obtained through semi structured and open interviews, in which 51 informants were interviewed. Data were analyzed with Informant Agreement Relative (IAR) and Frequency of Citation (FC) indices. RESULTS: A total number of 106 taxa of medicinal plants were collected from ten villages from the surrounding plains and highlands of Mt. Taftan, out of 446 plant taxa collected or reported as native in the area. Most plants belong to the Irano-Turanian phytogeographical region in which Asteraceae (15%), Lamiaceae (11%), Fabaceae (8%), Rosaceae (7%), Apiaceae (7%) and Brassicaceae (5%) are those predominantly used. The regression analysis shows that families Apiaceae, Lamiaceae, Solanaceae and Rosaceae are more highly used as medicinal than species rich families such as Asteraceae and Fabaceae, which are the richest families in the Iranian flora. The highest FC was recorded for Artemisia spp. (41) and Berberis integerrima (40). The highest IAR Index was obtained for stings (0.86), followed by disorders in the circulatory system (0.7), dental problems (0.70) and injuries (0.69). Comparing our data with major ethnobotanical references in Iran revealed that medicinal applications of 34 taxa have not been cited, including Hyoscyamus malekianus, a local endemic plant using for ailments of toothache and worms. The toxicity of the endemic Semenovia suffruticosa is also reported. CONCLUSION: As a result of this study we conclude that Taftan area harbours many plant species for which indigenous knowledge provides a background of medicinal importance. The high percentage of medicinal plants proportional to the native flora is 23.8%, compared to the world percentage of 17.1%, is an indication of the rich knowledge and relationship of isolated Baluchi tribes living in Mt. Taftan to the local flora growing in their surroundings. This rich knowledge should be highly regarded as a cultural and ethnobotanical heritage. Furthermore, ethnobotanical results show some weak interrelation between Baluchi tribes living in Iran and Pakistan, probably because of a different flora and/or unfavourable environmental conditions and perhaps local conflicts which might have reduced active cultural exchange.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29447200
[Au] Autor:Rather SA; Subramaniam S; Danda S; Pandey AK
[Ad] Address:Plant Systematics Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Discovery of two new species of Crotalaria (Leguminosae, Crotalarieae) from Western Ghats, India.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192226, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two new species of Fabaceae-Papilionoideae are described and illustrated. Crotalaria suffruticosa from Karul Ghat region of Maharashtra is morphologically close to C. albida and C. epunctata. C. multibracteata from Panhala region of Maharashtra resembles C. vestita. C. suffruticosa differs from C. albida and C. epunctata in its habit, leaf, inflorescence, callosity, keel type, stigma, style morphology and number of seeds/pod. To test if the new species differ from their morphologically most similar species, we measured various traits and performed a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This analysis shows that the new species differs from similar species in gross morphology for several diagnostic traits and showed correlations between the variables or distance among groups and estimated the contribution of each character. Phylogenetic analyses were also conducted based on nuclear (ITS) and plastid (matK) markers. The analyses revealed nucleotide differences between the new species and their close allies attributing to their distinctiveness. A map and key including all species of Crotalaria from Maharashtra state are provided. Conservation status of the two new species have also been assessed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192226

  10 / 14551 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29421592
[Au] Autor:Hishe HZ; Ambech TA; Hiben MG; Fanta BS
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia. Electronic address: hailemichael.hishe@mu.edu.et.
[Ti] Title:Anti-nociceptive effect of methanol extract of leaves of Senna singueana in mice.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;217:49-53, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Senna singueana (Del.) Lock (Fabaceae) is a shrub or tree found in Ethiopia and other African countries. It has been traditionally used for different conditions including treatment of pain conditions in humans and animals. Although various reports are available in the literature claiming different activities of the plant, scientific studies supporting analgesic potential of S. singueana are lacking and the present study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of leaves of S. singueana in mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anti-nociceptive activity of S. singueana (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg, p.o) was investigated using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced paw licking, and hot plate tests. Acute oral toxicity was determined using a slightly modified guideline (423) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. RESULTS: S. singueana extract increased the percentage of inhibition of writhing response and licking response (neurogenic and inflammatory phase) in acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced paw licking tests, respectively. It also significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased the percentage of mean maximal effect (%MPE) compared to control group in the hot-plate test. In all models, the combination of S. singueana with either diclofenac or morphine produced statistically significant increase (p ≤ 0.05) in the percentage of inhibition of writhing, paw licking, and %MPE compared to single treatment groups. It was also found that the 400 mg/kg extract produced higher antinociceptive effects (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the 200 mg/kg. CONCLUSION: S. singueana leaves may have analgesic effect that is mediated through both peripheral and central mechanisms and could be used as adjuvant treatment to the modern analgesics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher


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