Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29390366
[Au] Autor:Wang JK; Ma WJ; Lu Q; Zheng EL; Yang Q; Hu HJ; Liu F; Li QS; Li FY
[Ad] Address:Department of Biliary Surgery.
[Ti] Title:First case report of retroperitoneal metastasis of fascioliasis after surgery.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9258, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Fascioliasis is a rare cause of liver abscesses, and its clinical course consists of hepatic phase and biliary phase. PATIENT CONCERNS: We describe a 58-year-old female patient who presented with a 2-month history of intermittent fever and abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed confluent low-density lesions in the liver. Complete surgical resection of these abscesses was performed, and postoperative pathological examination and serological tests confirmed a diagnosis of fascioliasis. However, 4 months after the surgery, follow-up CT revealed a lesion in the retroperitoneal area. Meanwhile, ultrasonography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the retroperitoneal lesion was performed, and a parasitic infection was suspected. DIAGNOSES: Retroperitoneal metastasis of hepatic phase fascioliasis. INTERVENTIONS: The patient received parasitic resistance treatment with triclabendazole at a dose of 10 mg/kg/d for 2 consecutive days. OUTCOMES: After 2 courses of triclabendazole therapy, the retroperitoneal metastasis regressed to a minor lesion. LESSONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of retroperitoneal metastasis of fascioliasis, aimed at helping recognize the clinical features and treatment options of this rare disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fascioliasis/diagnostic imaging
Fascioliasis/surgery
Retroperitoneal Space/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biopsy, Needle
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009258

  2 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29273443
[Au] Autor:Agrawal MC; Rao VG
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Science & A.H., Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India. Electronic address: drmcagrawal@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Some facts on south asian schistosomiasis and need for international collaboration.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;180:76-80, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this review, we are discussing South Asian schistosomiasis; more specifically species which are responsible for schistosomiasis in India or South Asia -Schistosoma indicum, S. spindale, S. nasale, S. incognitum, S. gimvicum (S.haematobium), Bivitellobilharzia nairi, Orientobilharzia bomfordi, O. dattai, O. turkestanicum and O.harinasutai, their survival strategies such as mild pathology to the host, producing low egg number and utilizing fresh water snails (Indoplanorbis exustus and Lymnaea luteola) in stagnant water bodies like ponds, lakes, ditches, low laying areas, marshy lands and rice fields. Presently, correct identification of blood fluke species, their immature stages, male schistosomes and their intermediate host details like strain variations, susceptibilities, ecologies are not well studied. Species like B. nairi, O. bomfordi, O. harinasutai (Lymnaea rubiginosa intermediate host for O.harinasutai in Thailand) are also not well studied. Moreover, snail species like Oncomalania spp are not from South Asia, but species of Tricula or Neotricula are reported from this geography, which gives indications of S. mekongi like blood fluke presence in the area. Although in humans, cercarial dermatitis is rampant in rural population with occasional reporting of schistosome eggs in stools, human schistosomiasis is considered absent from this region, despite finding a foci (now dead) of urinary schistosomiasis in Gimvi village of Ratnagiri district, Maharashtra, India. There is great difficulty in diagnosing the infection in man and animals due to low egg production, hence development of a single step antigen detection test is the need of the hour. Interestingly, lethal effect of praziquantel was seen against S.haematobium and S.mansoni. However, this drug failed to cause significant reduction of S. incognitum and S. spindale experimentally suggesting some differences in the biology of two groups of the schistosomes. Triclabendazole showed adulticidal effect at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg body against female schistosome worms, but at lower dose (10 mg/kg body wt) of the drug, a dose that is used in treating bovine fascioliasis, it is providing chances of drug resistance of the persisting schistosomes against triclabendazole. Though the South Asian institutes have all the facilities to tackle issues related to existing schistosomes, it is recommended to develop an international collaboration by establishing an international centre on schistosomiasis in India.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29232690
[Au] Autor:Anandanarayanan A; Raina OK; Lalrinkima H; Rialch A; Sankar M; Varghese A
[Ad] Address:Division of Parasitology, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, UP-India.
[Ti] Title:RNA interference in Fasciola gigantica: Establishing and optimization of experimental RNAi in the newly excysted juveniles of the fluke.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(12):e0006109, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola gigantica is a neglected tropical disease but a constraint on the growth and productivity of cattle, buffaloes and sheep in the tropical countries of Asia and Africa. Resistance to commonly used anthelmintics in Fasciola has increased the need to search for alternative therapeutic targets. RNA interference is the current tool of choice in the search for such targets in Fasciola. The susceptibility of juvenile Fasciola hepatica to double stranded (ds) RNA induced RNAi has been established but in F. gigantica a single preliminary report on RNAi induced mRNA transcript knockdown is available. Here we optimized conditions for RNAi in the liver fluke F.gigantica targeting six genes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), σ class of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), cathepsin (Cat) L1-D, Cat B1, Cat B2 and Cat B3 that showed robust transcriptional silencing of the targets following exposure of the newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) to long (170-223 nt) dsRNA. Knockdown was shown to be concentration dependent with significant mRNA transcript suppression occurring at 5 ng / l that showed further suppression with the increase in the dsRNA concentration. The dsRNA induced persistent silencing of the mRNA transcript of SOD and σGST up to 15 days of observation. Delivery of the long dsRNA and siRNA to the newly excysted juveniles by soaking method was found to be efficient by tracking the uptake and diffusion of Cy3 labelled siRNA and long dsRNA in the flukes. Off-target effects of dsRNA trigger on some of the non-target genes were detected in the present investigation on RNAi in F. gigantica. The dsRNA induced superoxide dismutase protein suppression while impact of RNAi on other target proteins was not studied. There is no in vitro culture system for prolonged survival of the F. gigantica and in the present study in vitro maintenance of the NEJs is reported for a period of 3 weeks. The present study is the first attempt on optimization of RNAi protocols in F. gigantica where long dsRNA allowed for an efficient and persistent gene silencing, opening prospects for functional validation of putative vaccine and therapeutic targets in this neglected parasite.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fasciola hepatica/genetics
Fascioliasis/parasitology
RNA Interference
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Helminth Proteins/genetics
RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics
RNA, Messenger/genetics
RNA, Small Interfering/genetics
Superoxide Dismutase/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Helminth Proteins); 0 (RNA, Double-Stranded); 0 (RNA, Messenger); 0 (RNA, Small Interfering); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006109

  4 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29350372
[Au] Autor:Dolay K; Hasbaheci M; Hatipoglu E; mit Malya F; Akakaya A
[Ad] Address:Department of General Surgery, Bezmialem Vakif University Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul-Turkey. dolayk@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of biliary obstruction due to acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis secondary to Fasciola hepatica infection.
[So] Source:Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg;24(1):71-73, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1306-696X
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the differential diagnosis of biliary obstruction with unknown etiology, biliary fascioliasis should be considered in endemic and nonendemic regions. After diagnostic evaluation, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed for etiological evaluation and/or treatment of biliary obstruction in five patients with a mean age of 55.8 years. Endoscopic sphincterotomy and cholangiogram revealed linear filling defects in the biliary system. Fasciola hepatica parasites were extracted using balloon and basket catheters in two and three patients, respectively. No morbidity or mortality was observed. F. hepatica infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis of biliary obstruction with unknown etiology in endemic and non-endemic regions. ERCP can be the standard diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedure in cases of biliary obstruction due to fascioliasis. Due to slippery and gel-like characteristics of the parasite, use of a basket catheter in semi-opened position may be required in case of unsuccessful extraction using a balloon catheter.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5505/tjtes.2017.89490

  5 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29185852
[Au] Autor:Labruna MB; Costa F; Port-Carvalho M; Oliveira A; Souza S; Castro M
[Ad] Address:* University of So Paulo Professor Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of So Paulo.
[Ti] Title:Lethal Fascioliasis in Capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) in Brazil.
[So] Source:J Parasitol;, 2018 Jan 09.
[Is] ISSN:1937-2345
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda: Fasciolidae) causes fascioliasis, which affects mostly domestic ruminants and humans worldwide. This parasite has an Old World origin and was introduced into the New World by European colonizers. Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) is the largest living rodent species, with adults weighing over 60 kg. We report a fascioliasis outbreak caused by F. hepatica, that reduced a capybara group from 21 to 2 animals within a 9-mo period. Animal infection and associated lesions were confirmed by post-mortem examinations, which revealed extensive liver damage associated with the presence of large number of adult and immature forms of F. hepatica. Both macroscopic and microscopic alterations in the liver were compatible with acute fascioliasis, which is characterized by a large parasite burden in the liver. Taxonomic identification of flukes collected from capybara livers were confirmed by molecular methods, which generated a mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase I (NDI) gene partial sequence that was 100% identical to a F. hepatica NDI sequence from the United Kingdom. This is the first report of deleterious effects caused by F. hepatica in capybaras, highlighting the potential harm caused by this exotic parasite in the capybara.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1645/17-114

  6 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29284483
[Au] Autor:Byrne AW; Graham J; Brown C; Donaghy A; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo M; McNair J; Skuce R; Allen A; McDowell S
[Ad] Address:Agri-food and Biosciences Institute, Veterinary Science Division, Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT43SD, UK. andrew.byrne@afbini.gov.uk.
[Ti] Title:Bovine tuberculosis visible lesions in cattle culled during herd breakdowns: the effects of individual characteristics, trade movement and co-infection.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;13(1):400, 2017 Dec 29.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains a significant problem for livestock industries in many countries worldwide including Northern Ireland, where a test and slaughter regime has utilised the Single Intradermal Comparative Cervical Tuberculin (SICCT) test since 1959. We investigated the variation in post-mortem confirmation based on bTB visible lesion (VL) presence during herd breakdowns using two model suites. We investigated animal-level characteristics, while controlling for herd-level factors and clustering. We were interested in potential impacts of concurrent infection, and therefore we assessed whether animals with evidence of liver fluke infection (Fasciola hepatica; post-mortem inspection), M. avium reactors (animals with negative M. bovis-avium (b-a) tuberculin reactions) or Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV; RT-PCR tested) were associated with bTB confirmation. RESULTS: The dataset included 6242 animals removed during the 14month study period (2013-2015). bTB-VL presence was significantly increased in animals with greater b-a reaction size at the disclosing SICCT test (e.g. b-a = 5-9mm vs. b-a =0mm, adjusted Odds ratio (aOR): 14.57; p < 0.001). M. avium reactor animals (b-a < 0) were also significantly more likely to disclose VL than non-reactor animals (b-a =0; aOR: 2.29; p = 0.023). Animals had a greater probability of exhibiting lesions with the increasing number of herds it had resided within (movement; log-herds: aOR: 2.27-2.42; p < 0.001), if it had an inconclusive penultimate test result (aOR: 2.84-3.89; p < 0.001), and with increasing time between tests (log-time; aOR: 1.23; p = 0.003). Animals were less likely to have VL if they were a dairy breed (aOR: 0.79; p = 0.015) or in an older age-class (e.g. age-quartile 2 vs. 4; aOR: 0.65; p < 0.001). Liver fluke or BVDV variables were not retained in either multivariable model as they were non-significantly associated with bTB-VL status (p > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that neither co-infection of liver fluke nor BVDV had a significant effect on the presence of VLs in this high-risk cohort. M. avium tuberculin reactors had a significantly increased risk of disclosing with a bTB lesion, which could be related to the impact of co-infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) affecting the performance of the SICCT however further research in this area is required. Movements, test history, breed and age were important factors influencing confirmation in high-risk animals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180104
[Lr] Last revision date:180104
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-017-1321-z

  7 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29206115
[Au] Autor:Sridhar B; Ravikumar K
[Ad] Address:Center for X-ray Crystallography, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007, India.
[Ti] Title:Role of halogen-halogen contacts in the crystal structures of three new solvates of the drug oxyclozanide.
[So] Source:Acta Crystallogr C Struct Chem;73(Pt 12):1056-1063, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:2053-2296
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Halogen-halogen contacts are electrostatic in nature and exhibit directionality similar to hydrogen bonds. Oxyclozanide [systematic name: 2,3,5-trichloro-N-(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-hydroxybenzamide] is a drug used for the treatment of fascioliasis in domestic animals. The molecule carries five chlorine substituents and represents an ideal candidate for the study of halogen bonds in the crystal. Three new crystalline solvates of oxyclozanide, namely, oxyclozanide benzene hemisolvate, C H Cl NO 0.5C H , (I), oxyclozanide xylene hemisolvate, C H Cl NO 0.5C H , (II), and oxyclozanide toluene hemisolvate, C H Cl NO 0.5C H , (III), were structurally characterized. In this context, the crystal structure of oxyclozanide chlorobenzene hemisolvate, C H Cl NO 0.5C H Cl, (IV), was redetermined based on intensity data collected at 100 K. In all four solvates, the cocrystallized solvent molecules are located on crystallographic inversion centres. Solvates (I)-(IV) exhibit similar one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded chains generated by O-H...O, O-H...Cl and Cl...Cl interactions. The extension of these one-dimensional chains into two-dimensional layers is promoted by Cl...Cl and C-H...π contacts. Solvates (III) and (IV) are isostructural and differ from (I) and (II) with respect to subtle details concerning the intermolecular contacts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1107/S2053229617015923

  8 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29158867
[Au] Autor:Lefryekh R; Bensaad A; Bensardi F; Elhattabi K; Bouali M; Daif B; Fadil A; Jaouhari Z; Hicham T; Hamdani A; Abdalaoui MS
[Ad] Address:Surgical Emergency Unit P35, University Teaching Hospital Ibn Rochd, Casablanca, Morocco.
[Ti] Title:Hepatic fascioliasis presenting with bile duct obstruction: a case report.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:44, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fascioliasis is a zoonotic infection caused by a liver trematode: fasciola hepatica; which commonly affects cattle and sheep, humans are accidental hosts. Several cases have been reported in the literature worldwide with a large geographical distribution. We present a case of bile duct obstruction due to a hepatic fascioliasis, successfully treated with both a combined surgical and medical approaches. A high index of suspicion should be kept in mind for all cases of obstructive jaundice, especially in areas in which human fascioliasis infection is repeatedly reported.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171123
[Lr] Last revision date:171123
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.44.11532

  9 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29132905
[Au] Autor:Hemici A; Benerbaiha RS; Bendjeddou D
[Ad] Address:Department of Natural and Life Sciences, Faculty of SNV-STU, University 8 Mai 45, Guelma 24000, Algeria. Electronic address: hemici_ah65@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Purification and biochemical characterization of a 22-kDa stable cysteine- like protease from the excretory-secretory product of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica by using conventional techniques.
[So] Source:J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci;1068-1069:268-276, 2017 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-376X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study describes the purification and characterization of a stable protease activity isolated from Fasciola hepatica adult worms maintained in vitro by employing acetone precipitation (40-60%) followed by a gel filtration through Sephadex G-100 and DEAE- cellulose ion exchange column. Through this three-step purification, the enzyme was purified 11-fold with a specific activity of 1893.9U/mg and 31.5% recovery. After the final ultrafiltration step, the purification fold was increased up to 13.1 and the overall activity yield reached a rate of 18.8%. The MW of the purified protease was estimated by reducing SDS-PAGE to be 22kDa while the proteolytic activity detection was carried out by zymography on non-denaturing SDS-PAGE containing the casein as substrate. Using this substrate, the protease showed extreme proteolytic activity at pH 5.5 and temperature 35-40C and was highly stable over a wide range of pH, from 5.0 to 10.0. In addition to its preference for the Z-Phe-Arg-AMC fluorogenic substrate resulting in maximum proteolytic activity (99.7%) at pH 7.0, the pure protease exhibited highest cleavage activity against hemoglobin and casein substrates at pH 5.5 (85.6% and 82.8%, respectively). The K values obtained for this protease were 5.4, 13, 160 and approximately 1000M using respectively the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, hemoglobin, casein and albumin. The protease activity was completely inhibited either by E-64 inhibitor (5mM) or iodoacetamide (10mM), indicating its cysteine nature. The usefulness of the purified protease as an antigen was studied by immunoblotting. Thus, sera from sheep experimentally infected with F. hepatica recognized the protease band at 2 weeks post-infection (WPI) and strongly at 7 WPI. The early detection of antibodies anti- F. hepatica suggests the application of this molecule as a specific epitope for the serodiagnosis of fascioliasis disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 3725 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29118312
[Au] Autor:Jarujareet W; Taira K; Ooi HK
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University.
[Ti] Title:Dynamics of liver enzymes in rabbits experimentally infected with Fasciola sp. (Intermediate form from Japan).
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;, 2017 Nov 09.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dynamics of serum liver enzymes in rabbits experimentally infected with metacercariae of Fasciola sp. (intermediate form between Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica) were monitored. Gradual increase of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were observed from 3 weeks post-inoculation (WPI) and peaked at 6 WPI, which corresponded well to the period of migration and development of juvenile fluke in the liver parenchyma and the time when the young adult flukes migrated to the bile duct. However, no significant increase in serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were observed. This could reflect reduced or minimal injury of bile ducts and biliary epithelia as the flukes had reached the adult stage. Alpha- fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were not detected in the infected rabbit during the course of the experiment. Serum liver enzymes monitoring might be useful for understanding the host-parasite relationship in fascioliasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.17-0315


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