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[PMID]: 27495901
[Au] Autor:Morphew RM; Wilkinson TJ; Mackintosh N; Jahndel V; Paterson S; McVeigh P; Abbas Abidi SM; Saifullah K; Raman M; Ravikumar G; LaCourse J; Maule A; Brophy PM
[Ad] Address:Aberystwyth University , Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Exploring and Expanding the Fatty-Acid-Binding Protein Superfamily in Fasciola Species.
[So] Source:J Proteome Res;15(9):3308-21, 2016 Sep 02.
[Is] ISSN:1535-3907
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica infect livestock worldwide and threaten food security with climate change and problematic control measures spreading disease. Fascioliasis is also a foodborne disease with up to 17 million humans infected. In the absence of vaccines, treatment depends on triclabendazole (TCBZ), and overuse has led to widespread resistance, compromising future TCBZ control. Reductionist biology from many laboratories has predicted new therapeutic targets. To this end, the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) superfamily has proposed multifunctional roles, including functions intersecting vaccine and drug therapy, such as immune modulation and anthelmintic sequestration. Research is hindered by a lack of understanding of the full FABP superfamily complement. Although discovery studies predicted FABPs as promising vaccine candidates, it is unclear if uncharacterized FABPs are more relevant for vaccine formulations. We have coupled genome, transcriptome, and EST data mining with proteomics and phylogenetics to reveal a liver fluke FABP superfamily of seven clades: previously identified clades I-III and newly identified clades IV-VII. All new clade FABPs were analyzed using bioinformatics and cloned from both liver flukes. The extended FABP data set will provide new study tools to research the role of FABPs in parasite biology and as therapy targets.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fasciola/chemistry
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Computational Biology
Data Mining
Fascioloidiasis/drug therapy
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins/therapeutic use
Phylogeny
Proteomics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171106
[Lr] Last revision date:171106
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160807
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00331

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[PMID]: 27423736
[Au] Autor:Lee JK; Rosser TG; Cooley J
[Ad] Address:Departments of Pathobiology and Population Medicine (Lee, Cooley), College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MSBasic Sciences (Rosser), College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS klee@cvm.msstate.edu.
[Ti] Title:Pulmonary embolization of immature Fascioloides magna causing fatal hemothorax confirmed by molecular technique in a heifer in the United States.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;28(5):584-8, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The current report describes the use of a molecular technique to identify immature Fascioloides magna An 18-month-old Brangus heifer was found dead in the field without any prior clinical signs. The cause of death was exsanguination into the thoracic cavity associated with pulmonary embolization and infection by immature Fascioloides magna resulting in 2 large foci of pulmonary necrosis and focal arteriolar and lung rupture. The liver had a few random migratory tracts with typical iron and porphyrin fluke exhaust, but no identified fluke larvae. A single immature fluke was found in the lungs, and species level identification as F. magna was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 region, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2) and of partial 28S rRNA gene sequence. This is one of only a few pulmonary fascioloidiasis cases associated with hemothorax in the veterinary literature.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cattle Diseases/diagnosis
Fasciolidae/isolation & purification
Fascioloidiasis/diagnosis
Lung Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases/parasitology
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Fatal Outcome
Female
Hemothorax/etiology
Hemothorax/veterinary
Lung Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis
Pulmonary Embolism/etiology
Pulmonary Embolism/veterinary
United States
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160718
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638716660129

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[PMID]: 25778909
[Au] Autor:Malcicka M; Agosta SJ; Harvey JA
[Ad] Address:Section Animal Ecology, Department of Ecological Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Multi level ecological fitting: indirect life cycles are not a barrier to host switching and invasion.
[So] Source:Glob Chang Biol;21(9):3210-8, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2486
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many invasive species are able to escape from coevolved enemies and thus enjoy a competitive advantage over native species. However, during the invasion phase, non-native species must overcome many ecological and/or physiological hurdles before they become established and spread in their new habitats. This may explain why most introduced species either fail to establish or remain as rare interstitials in their new ranges. Studies focusing on invasive species have been based on plants or animals where establishment requires the possession of preadapted traits from their native ranges that enables them to establish and spread in their new habitats. The possession of preadapted traits that facilitate the exploitation of novel resources or to colonize novel habitats is known as 'ecological fitting'. Some species have evolved traits and life histories that reflect highly intimate associations with very specific types of habitats or niches. For these species, their phenological windows are narrow, and thus the ability to colonize non-native habitats requires that a number of conditions need to be met in accordance with their more specialized life histories. Some of the strongest examples of more complex ecological fitting involve invasive parasites that require different animal hosts to complete their life cycles. For instance, the giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, is a major parasite of several species of ungulates in North America. The species exhibits a life cycle whereby newly hatched larvae must find suitable intermediate hosts (freshwater snails) and mature larvae, definitive hosts (ungulates). Intermediate and definitive host ranges of F. magna in its native range are low in number, yet this parasite has been successfully introduced into Europe where it has become a parasite of native European snails and deer. We discuss how the ability of these parasites to overcome multiple ecophysiological barriers represents an excellent example of 'multiple-level ecological fitting'.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deer
Fasciolidae/physiology
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Host-Parasite Interactions
Introduced Species
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biological Evolution
Europe
Fasciolidae/growth & development
Fascioloidiasis/epidemiology
Larva/growth & development
Larva/physiology
Snails/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 150920
[Lr] Last revision date:150920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150318
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/gcb.12928

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[PMID]: 21509448
[Au] Autor:Reblánová M; Spakulová M; Orosová M; Králová-Hromadová I; Bazsalovicsová E; Rajský D
[Ad] Address:Parasitological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Hlinkova 3, 04001 Kosice, Slovakia. reblan@saske.sk
[Ti] Title:A comparative study of karyotypes and chromosomal location of rDNA genes in important liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae).
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;109(4):1021-8, 2011 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chromosomal characteristics, i.e., number, size, morphology, and location of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters were examined in two medically important liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna (Fasciolidae), using conventional Giemsa staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with ribosomal 18S rDNA probe. A comparison of F. magna and F. hepatica karyotypes confirmed significant differences in all chromosomal features. Whilst the karyotype of F. hepatica comprised ten pairs of chromosomes (one metacentric and nine medium-sized subtelocentrics and submetacentrics; 2n = 20, n = 1 m + 5 sm + 4 st; TCL = 49.9 µm), the complement of F. magna was composed of 11 pairs of medium-sized subtelocentrics and submeta-metacentrics (2n = 22, n = 9 st + 1 sm + 1 sm-m; TCL = 35.2 µm). Noticeable differences were found mainly in length and morphology of first chromosome pair. It was metacentric and 9.0 µm long in F. hepatica while subtelocentric and 4.7 µm long in F. magna. Although FISH with rDNA probe revealed a single cluster of ribosomal genes in both species, conspicuous interspecific differences were displayed by chromosomal location of ribosomal loci (i.e., NORs). The signals were found on short arms of fifth homologous pair in F. hepatica; however, they were detected in pericentromeric regions of the long arms of tenth pair in F. magna. The observed cytogenetic differences were interpreted in terms of karyotype evolution of fasciolid flukes; F. hepatica may be regarded phylogenetically younger than F. magna. The present paper provides a pilot study on molecular cytogenetics within a group of hermaphroditic digenetic flukes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chromosomes/ultrastructure
Cytogenetics/methods
Fasciola hepatica/genetics
Fascioliasis/parasitology
Fasciolidae/genetics
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Nucleolus Organizer Region/ultrastructure
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases/parasitology
Chromosomes/chemistry
Chromosomes/genetics
DNA Probes/chemistry
DNA Probes/genetics
Deer
Fasciola hepatica/isolation & purification
Fascioliasis/veterinary
Fasciolidae/isolation & purification
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Karyotype
Karyotyping
Liver/parasitology
Mitosis
Nucleolus Organizer Region/chemistry
Nucleolus Organizer Region/genetics
Phylogeny
Pilot Projects
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/chemistry
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/genetics
Slovakia
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA Probes); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 18S)
[Em] Entry month:1201
[Cu] Class update date: 171007
[Lr] Last revision date:171007
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110422
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-011-2339-y

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[PMID]: 16865781
[Au] Autor:Limpaiboon T; Tapdara S; Jearanaikoon P; Sripa B; Bhudhisawasdi V
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Chemistry, Center for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. temduang@kku.ac.th
[Ti] Title:Prognostic significance of microsatellite alterations at 1p36 in cholangiocarcinoma.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;12(27):4377-82, 2006 Jul 21.
[Is] ISSN:1007-9327
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) on the chromosomal region 1p36-pter in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) patients and determine the association between microsatellite alterations and clinicopathological parameters. METHODS: Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers were determined for LOH and MSI using GS-3000 gel scan fragment autoanalyzer. RESULTS: Sixty-eight out of 90 cases (75.6%) showed LOH in one or more loci. LOH was found most frequently at D1S199 (40.0%), D1S507 (34.6%), D1S2845 (30.5%), and D1S2734 (30.1%). MSI was found in 34 of 90 cases (37.8%) at one or more loci. Fine mapping at 1p36 showed two distinctive regions of common loss, which were D1S2845 and the 25.5-cM region between D1S507 and D1S2734, indicating the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes that is likely to play important roles in the development of CCA. Patients with LOH at D1S234 showed less lymphatic invasion (P = 0.017), whereas patients with LOH at D1S2676 exhibited more lymphatic invasion than those without (P = 0.031). LOH at D1S2845 showed a significant correlation with nerve invasion (P = 0.029). Moreover, patients who demonstrated MSI at D1S228 showed a poor prognosis (P = 0.0026). CONCLUSION: Allelic loss plays a major role in microsatellite alterations at chromosome 1p36, which may contribute to carcinogenesis and pathogenesis of liver fluke related CCA and these alterations can be used as molecular prognostic indicators for CCA patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bile Duct Neoplasms/genetics
Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/pathology
Cholangiocarcinoma/genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics
DNA, Neoplasm/genetics
Microsatellite Repeats/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alleles
Animals
Bile Duct Neoplasms/diagnosis
Bile Duct Neoplasms/etiology
Bile Duct Neoplasms/pathology
Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/parasitology
Cholangiocarcinoma/diagnosis
Cholangiocarcinoma/etiology
Cholangiocarcinoma/pathology
Chromosomal Instability/genetics
Chromosome Mapping
DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins/physiology
Deoxyribonucleases/genetics
Deoxyribonucleases/physiology
Disease Progression
Fasciola hepatica/pathogenicity
Fascioloidiasis/complications
Fascioloidiasis/diagnosis
Fascioloidiasis/pathology
Genes, Tumor Suppressor/physiology
Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity/genetics
Neoplasm Invasiveness/genetics
Nuclear Proteins/genetics
Nuclear Proteins/physiology
Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins
Prognosis
Transcription Factors/genetics
Transcription Factors/physiology
cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein/genetics
cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Neoplasm); 0 (DNA-Binding Proteins); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins); 0 (Transcription Factors); EC 2.1.1.43 (Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase); EC 2.1.1.43 (PRDM2 protein, human); EC 3.1.- (DFFB protein, human); EC 3.1.- (Deoxyribonucleases); EC 3.6.5.2 (cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein)
[Em] Entry month:0609
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:060726
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 16131000
[Au] Autor:McClanahan SL; Stromberg BE; Hayden DW; Averbeck GA; Wilson JH
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1365 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA.
[Ti] Title:Natural infection of a horse with Fascioloides magna.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;17(4):382-5, 2005 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1040-6387
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 25-year-old Quarterhorse mare was euthanized for a variety of medical reasons. At necropsy, 7 liver flukes, identified as Fascioloides magna, were recovered from the liver. This is the first report of F. magna in a horse.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fasciolidae/isolation & purification
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Horse Diseases/parasitology
Liver Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Horses
Liver/parasitology
Liver/pathology
Liver Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:0605
[Cu] Class update date: 170214
[Lr] Last revision date:170214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:050901
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 15855700
[Au] Autor:Kvitashvili MA; Dvali ShA; Kokaia IZh
[Ad] Address:Infection Diseases, AIDS and Clinical Immunology Research Center; Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine, Tbilisi, Georgia.
[Ti] Title:[Fascioliasis case in the patient with hepatitis A].
[So] Source:Georgian Med News;(120):51-5, 2005 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1512-0112
[Cp] Country of publication:Georgia (Republic)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:There is some portion of patients with clinically manifested acute viral hepatitis, which are seronegative to hepatitis A markers. They have to be differentiated with other patients with B, C, D hepatitis, mechanical jaundice, etc. Such clinical cases make physician to recall the parasitic diseases, such as fascioliasis, which affects hepatobiliary system, causes prolongation of cholestasis and dystrophic changes in the biliary tract and likely to cause liver cirrhosis. In the presented case the initial diagnosis was severe acute Hepatitis A (anti-HAV IgM+), though the peripheral blood examination showed moderate eosinophilia, ultrasound investigation revealed multiple sites of damage in the liver, which made us to consider fascioliasis, the latter was confirmed by the serological analysis. Appropriate medical treatment was effective and the state of the patient has improved.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fascioloidiasis/complications
Hepatitis A/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Fascioloidiasis/diagnosis
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Humans
Liver/diagnostic imaging
Liver/parasitology
Male
Ultrasonography
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:0510
[Cu] Class update date: 161124
[Lr] Last revision date:161124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:050428
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 11163696
[Au] Autor:Gaasenbeek CP; Moll L; Cornelissen JB; Vellema P; Borgsteede FH
[Ad] Address:Institute for Animal Science and Health (ID-Lelystad), PO Box 65, 8200 AB, Lelystad, Netherlands. c.p.h.gaasenbeek@id.wag-ur.nl
[Ti] Title:An experimental study on triclabendazole resistance of Fasciola hepatica in sheep.
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;95(1):37-43, 2001 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0304-4017
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The efficacy of triclabendazole in sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica was studied. Two groups of 12 lambs were infected with a susceptible (S) or a resistant (R) strain of F. hepatica. Eight weeks after infection, six lambs of each group (ST and RT) were treated with triclabendazole (10mg/kg). The other lambs were used as untreated controls (SC and RC). The parameters studied were: GLDH, gamma-GT, ELISA measuring antibodies against recombinant cathepsin-L(1) and eggs per gram faeces (epg). The lambs were slaughtered 16 weeks after infection and the number of flukes counted. The GLDH, gamma-GT levels and the OD value of the ELISA decreased as a result of the treatment in group ST. Patent infections were observed in all animals of groups SC, RT and RC. In group ST, occasionally a few eggs were found in five lambs. The percentage of flukes was 31.3 in SC and 37.6 in RC. In the treated groups ST and RT, the percentage of flukes was 0.06 and 33.6, respectively. These results corresponded to efficacies of 99.8% in the susceptible and 10.8% in the resistant strain. Since the resistant strain was isolated from a mixed cattle and sheep farm, it confirms the presence of triclabendazole resistance in the Netherlands.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anthelmintics/pharmacology
Benzimidazoles/pharmacology
Fasciola hepatica/drug effects
Fascioloidiasis/drug therapy
Sheep Diseases/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anthelmintics/therapeutic use
Antibodies, Helminth/blood
Benzimidazoles/therapeutic use
Drug Resistance
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary
Fascioloidiasis/blood
Fascioloidiasis/parasitology
Feces/parasitology
Female
Glutamate Dehydrogenase/blood
Male
Netherlands
Sheep
Sheep Diseases/blood
Sheep Diseases/parasitology
gamma-Glutamyltransferase/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); 0 (Antibodies, Helminth); 0 (Benzimidazoles); 4784C8E03O (triclabendazole); EC 1.4.1.2 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase); EC 2.3.2.2 (gamma-Glutamyltransferase)
[Em] Entry month:0104
[Cu] Class update date: 141120
[Lr] Last revision date:141120
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:010213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 9577799
[Au] Autor:Waldrup K
[Ti] Title:Concerning treatment of fascioloidiasis.
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;34(2):417, 1998 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0090-3558
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Albendazole/therapeutic use
Anthelmintics/therapeutic use
Deer/parasitology
Fascioloidiasis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; LETTER
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); F4216019LN (Albendazole)
[Em] Entry month:9806
[Cu] Class update date: 131121
[Lr] Last revision date:131121
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:980513
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 9391977
[Au] Autor:Hood BR; Rognlie MC; Knapp SE
[Ad] Address:Montana State University-Bozeman 59717-3610, USA.
[Ti] Title:Fascioloidiasis in game-ranched elk from Montana.
[So] Source:J Wildl Dis;33(4):882-5, 1997 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0090-3558
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The distribution of Fascioloides magna in game-ranched elk and the potential for spread of the parasite through movement of infected animals was examined in Montana (USA). Fecal samples (n = 448) collected from captive elk on 29 game ranches were examined for eggs of F. magna by fecal sedimentation. Eggs were detected in elk on 5 ranches. This suggests that F. magna has been translocated by infected game-ranched elk. The wide distribution of snail intermediate hosts for F. magna in Montana indicates a potential to spread the parasite to other captive cervids domestic livestock or free-ranging wildlife.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deer/parasitology
Fascioloidiasis/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Domestic
Disease Outbreaks/veterinary
Montana/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:9803
[Cu] Class update date: 061115
[Lr] Last revision date:061115
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:971210
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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