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[PMID]: 25010283
[Au] Autor:Gladue DP; O'Donnell V; Fernandez-Sainz IJ; Fletcher P; Baker-Branstetter R; Holinka LG; Sanford B; Carlson J; Lu Z; Borca MV
[Ad] Address:Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Greenport, NY 11944, USA. Electronic address: douglas.gladue@ars.usda.gov....
[Ti] Title:Interaction of structural core protein of classical swine fever virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9.
[So] Source:Virology;460-461:173-9, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0341
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, the osteosarcoma amplified 9 protein (OS9) was further studied. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, the OS9 binding site in the CSFV Core protein was identified, between Core residues (90)IAIM(93), near a putative cleavage site. Truncated versions of Core were used to show that OS9 binds a polypeptide representing the 12 C-terminal Core residues. Cells transfected with a double-fluorescent labeled Core construct demonstrated that co-localization of OS9 and Core occurred only on unprocessed forms of Core protein. A recombinant CSFV containing Core protein where residues (90)IAIM(93) were substituted by alanines showed no altered virulence in swine, but a significant decreased ability to replicate in cell cultures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024273
[Au] Autor:Cathey JT; Marr JS
[Ti] Title:Yellow fever, Asia and the East African slave trade.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;108(8):519, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/tru081

  3 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24980556
[Au] Autor:Johansson MA; Vasconcelos PF; Staples JE
[Ad] Address:Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA mjohansson@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:The whole iceberg: estimating the incidence of yellow fever virus infection from the number of severe cases.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;108(8):482-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Like many infectious agents, yellow fever (YF) virus only causes disease in a proportion of individuals it infects and severe illness only represents the tip of the iceberg relative to the total number of infections, the more critical factor for virus transmission. METHODS: We compiled data on asymptomatic infections, mild disease, severe disease (fever with jaundice or hemorrhagic symptoms) and fatalities from 11 studies in Africa and South America between 1969 and 2011. We used a Bayesian model to estimate the probability of each infection outcome. RESULTS: For YF virus infections, the probability of being asymptomatic was 0.55 (95% credible interval [CI] 0.37-0.74), mild disease 0.33 (95% CI 0.13-0.52) and severe disease 0.12 (95% CI 0.05-0.26). The probability of death for people experiencing severe disease was 0.47 (95% CI 0.31-0.62). CONCLUSIONS: In outbreak situations where only severe cases may initially be detected, we estimated that there may be between one and seventy infections that are either asymptomatic or cause mild disease for every severe case identified. As it is generally only the most severe cases that are recognized and reported, these estimates will help improve the understanding of the burden of disease and the estimation of the potential risk of spread during YF outbreaks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/tru092

  4 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24197672
[Au] Autor:Shiraishi M; Morita H; Muramatsu K; Sato A; Nitta J; Yamaguchi A; Adachi H
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Saitama Red-cross Hospital, 8-3-33 Kamiochiai, Chyuo-ku, Saitama, Saitama, 338-8553, Japan, manabu@omiya.jichi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Successful non-operative management of left atrioesophageal fistula following catheter ablation.
[So] Source:Surg Today;44(8):1565-8, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1436-2813
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a potentially lethal complication of catheter radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. A 49-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation around the pulmonary vein was admitted 31days after the procedure, suffering seizures and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed ischemia and multiple lesions of acute infarction in the right occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a small accumulation of air between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus, suggesting an AEF. Endoscopic snaring of the esophageal mucosa, repeated a few times, supported by nil by mouth and antibiotic therapy, resulted in improvement of his condition with no recurrence of symptoms. Subsequent chest CT scans confirmed disappearance of the leaked air and the patient was discharged home 45days after admission with no neurological compromise.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00595-013-0744-9

  5 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024899
[Au] Autor:Chen MW; King NK; Selvarajan S; Low DC
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore....
[Ti] Title:Benign scalp lump as an unusual presentation of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:99, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare benign histioproliferative disease. It is typically characterized by benign histiocyte proliferation with lymphadenopathy, fever, and leukocytosis and was first described in 1969 by Rosai and Dorfman. Extranodal involvement has been reported in approximately up to 43% of the cases with isolated central nervous system (CNS) manifestations being even rarer. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report our management of a 41-year-old female with extranodalpurely CNS RDD presenting as a benign scalp lump. Her lump progressed from an asymptomatic benign lesion to one causing localized cerebral edema. Treatment was surgical excision of both the cervical and CNS lesions achieving complete removal of the lesions and resolution of her symptoms. CONCLUSION: RDD is a rare condition and isolated CNS RDD is even less common. Benign scalp lumps have a myriad of differential diagnoses, but RDD should be a consideration in the presence of preexisting RDD lesions at other sites given its potential to progress and result in morbidity. It is imperative to be aware that symptoms may be especially deceiving as the absence of lymphadenopathy may point away from RDD as the diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134912

  6 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25020130
[Au] Autor:Ammann RA; Niggli FK; Leibundgut K; Teuffel O; Bodmer N
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland....
[Ti] Title:Exploring the association of hemoglobin level and adverse events in children with cancer presenting with Fever in neutropenia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e101696, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In children and adolescents with fever in neutropenia (FN) during chemotherapy for cancer, hemoglobin ≥90 g/L at presentation with FN had been associated with adverse events (AE). This analysis explored three hypothetical pathophysiological mechanisms potentially explaining this counterintuitive finding, and further analyzed the statistical association between hemoglobin and AE. METHODS: Two of 8 centers, reporting on 311 of 421 FN episodes in 138 of 215 patients participated in this retrospective analysis based on prospectively collected data from three databases (SPOG 2003 FN, transfusion and hematology laboratories). Associations with AE were analyzed using mixed logistic regression. RESULTS: Hemoglobin was ≥90 g/L in 141 (45%) of 311 FN episodes, specifically in 59/103 (57%) episodes with AE, and in 82/208 (39%) without (OR, 2.3; 99%CI, 1.1-4.9; P = 0.004). In FN with AE, hemoglobin was bimodally distributed with a dip around 85 g/L. There were no significant interactions for center, age and sex. In multivariate mixed logistic regression, AE was significantly and independently associated with leukopenia (leukocytes <0.3 G/L; OR, 3.3; 99%CI, 1.1-99; P = 0.004), dehydration (hemoglobinPresentation/hemoglobin8-72 hours ≥1.10 in untransfused patients; OR, 3.5; 99%CI, 1.1-11.4; P = 0.006) and non-moderate anemia (difference from 85 g/L; 1.6 per 10 g/L; 1.0-2.6; P = 0.005), but not with recent transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBC), very recent transfusion of pRBC or platelets, or with hemoglobin ≥90 g/L as such. CONCLUSIONS: Non-moderate anemia and dehydration were significantly and relevantly associated with the risk of AE in children with cancer and FN. These results need validation in prospective cohorts before clinical implementation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0101696

  7 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019967
[Au] Autor:Sang S; Yin W; Bi P; Zhang H; Wang C; Liu X; Chen B; Yang W; Liu Q
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early-Warning on Infectious Disease, Chinese Center...
[Ti] Title:Predicting Local Dengue Transmission in Guangzhou, China, through the Influence of Imported Cases, Mosquito Density and Climate Variability.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e102755, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Each year there are approximately 390 million dengue infections worldwide. Weather variables have a significant impact on the transmission of Dengue Fever (DF), a mosquito borne viral disease. DF in mainland China is characterized as an imported disease. Hence it is necessary to explore the roles of imported cases, mosquito density and climate variability in dengue transmission in China. The study was to identify the relationship between dengue occurrence and possible risk factors and to develop a predicting model for dengue's control and prevention purpose. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three traditional suburbs and one district with an international airport in Guangzhou city were selected as the study areas. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis were used to perform univariate analysis to identify possible risk factors, with relevant lagged effects, associated with local dengue cases. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract principal components and PCA score was used to represent the original variables to reduce multi-collinearity. Combining the univariate analysis and prior knowledge, time-series Poisson regression analysis was conducted to quantify the relationship between weather variables, Breteau Index, imported DF cases and the local dengue transmission in Guangzhou, China. The goodness-of-fit of the constructed model was determined by pseudo-R2, Akaike information criterion (AIC) and residual test. There were a total of 707 notified local DF cases from March 2006 to December 2012, with a seasonal distribution from August to November. There were a total of 65 notified imported DF cases from 20 countries, with forty-six cases (70.8%) imported from Southeast Asia. The model showed that local DF cases were positively associated with mosquito density, imported cases, temperature, precipitation, vapour pressure and minimum relative humidity, whilst being negatively associated with air pressure, with different time lags. CONCLUSIONS: Imported DF cases and mosquito density play a critical role in local DF transmission, together with weather variables. The establishment of an early warning system, using existing surveillance datasets will help to control and prevent dengue in Guangzhou, China.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0102755

  8 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24952011
[Au] Autor:Yang Y; Sang J; Pan W; Du L; Liao W; Chen J; Zhu Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.
[So] Source:Mycopathologia;178(1-2):63-70, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1573-0832
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15mgday(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11046-014-9741-9

  9 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25022297
[Au] Autor:Zakaria Z; Zainordin NA; Sim BL; Zaid M; Haridan US; Aziz AT; Shueb RH; Mustafa M; Yusoff NK; Malik AS; Lee CK; Abubakar S; Hoh BP
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia. zuraihanzakaria@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:An evaluation of the World Health Organization's 1997 and 2009 dengue classifications in hospitalized dengue patients in Malaysia.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;8(7):869-75, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The latest revised version of the World Health Organization's dengue classification was released in 2009. A handful of studies have taken initiatives to evaluate the old and revised guidelines to determine early signs and symptoms of severe dengue. This retrospective study aimed to compare the classification of dengue using both the 1997 and 2009 guidelines in a selected cohort of dengue patients from Peninsular Malaysia between 2008 and 2012. METHODOLOGY: Adult dengue patients were recruited from tertiary hospitals in two different states, Selangor and Kelantan, in Peninsular Malaysia. Their clinical manifestations were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 281 confirmed dengue patients were enrolled; the mean duration of illness at admission was five days. Of these, 88.6%, 10.7%, and 0.7% were classified according to the 1997 guidelines as having dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), respectively. When the WHO 2009 guidelines were applied, 17.1%, 78.3%, and 4.6% were classified as dengue without warning signs, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that the revised WHO 2009 guidelines stratify a much larger proportion of patients into a category that requires a higher level of medical and nursing care.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.4283

  10 / 235172 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24855916
[Au] Autor:Sawai T; Yoshioka S; Matsuo N; Suyama N; Kohno S
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagasaki Municipal Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan. Electronic address: toyosawai@yahoo.co.jp....
[Ti] Title:A case of community-acquired pneumonia due to influenza A virus and Nocardia farcinica co-infection.
[So] Source:J Infect Chemother;20(8):506-8, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1437-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nocardia spp. has not been reported previously as a cause of post-influenza pneumonia. Here we present a first case of post-influenza bacterial pneumonia due to Nocardia farcinica. Initial reason for hospitalization of the 90 year old female patient was a pneumonia with the symptoms of fever and productive cough. A rapid test for influenza antigen was positive for influenza A virus. Treatment with Zanamivir and piperacillin was initiated. However, after 1 week of treatment, the infiltration shadows on chest X-ray had worsened. Because the expectorated sputum collected on admission for culture was found to be positive for Nocardia spp., piperacillin was replaced with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and a chest X-ray showed some improvement. Although pulmonary nocardiosis with co-infection with influenza A is extremely rare, clinicians should be alert to the possibility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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