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[PMID]: 26937916
[Au] Autor:van Samkar A; Brouwer MC; van der Ende A; van de Beek D
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neurology (AVS, MCB, DVDB); Department of Medical Microbiology (AVDE), Academic Medical Center, Center of Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA); and Netherlands Reference Laboratory for Bacterial Meningitis (AVDE), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults: Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(8):e2858, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults.We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature.Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae.C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160328
[Lr] Last revision date:160328
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000002858

  2 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26695690
[Au] Autor:Nain M; Abdin MZ; Kalia M; Vrati S
[Ad] Address:Vaccine and Infectious Disease Research Center, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, NCR Biotech Science Cluster, Faridabad, India....
[Ti] Title:Japanese encephalitis virus invasion of cell: allies and alleys.
[So] Source:Rev Med Virol;26(2):129-41, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1654
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The mosquito-borne flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), is the leading cause of virus-induced encephalitis globally and a major public health concern of several countries in Southeast Asia, with the potential to become a global pathogen. The virus is neurotropic, and the disease ranges from mild fever to severe hemorrhagic and encephalitic manifestations and death. The early steps of the virus life cycle, binding, and entry into the cell are crucial determinants of infection and are potential targets for the development of antiviral therapies. JEV can infect multiple cell types; however, the key receptor molecule(s) still remains elusive. JEV also has the capacity to utilize multiple endocytic pathways for entry into cells of different lineages. This review not only gives a comprehensive update on what is known about the virus attachment and receptor system (allies) and the endocytic pathways (alleys) exploited by the virus to gain entry into the cell and establish infection but also discusses crucial unresolved issues. We also highlight common themes and key differences between JEV and other flaviviruses in these contexts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/rmv.1868

  3 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27208588
[Au] Autor:Harapan H; Anwar S; Setiawan AM; Sasmono RT; Aceh Dengue Study
[Ad] Address:Medical Research Unit, School of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia; Tropical Disease Centre, School of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia; Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Electronic address: har...
[Ti] Title:Dengue vaccine acceptance and associated factors in Indonesia: A community-based cross-sectional survey in Aceh.
[So] Source:Vaccine;34(32):3670-5, 2016 Jul 12.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The first dengue vaccine (DV) has been licensed in some countries, but an assessment of the public's acceptance of DV is widely lacking. This study aimed to explore and understand DV acceptance and its associated explanatory variables among healthy inhabitants of Aceh, Indonesia. METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from November 2014 to March 2015 in nine regencies of Aceh that were selected randomly. A set of validated questionnaires covering a range of explanatory variables and DV acceptance was used to conduct the interviews. A multi-step logistic regression analysis and Spearman's rank correlation were employed to assess the role of explanatory variables in DV acceptance. RESULTS: We included 652 community members in the final analysis and found that 77.3% of them were willing to accept the DV. Gender, monthly income, socioeconomic status (SES), attitude toward dengue fever (DF) and attitude toward vaccination practice were associated with DV acceptance in bivariate analyses (P<0.05). A correlation analysis confirmed that attitude toward vaccination practice and attitude toward DF were strongly correlated with DV acceptance, rs=0.41 and rs=0.39, respectively (P<0.001). The multivariate analysis revealed that a high monthly income, high SES, and a good attitude toward vaccination practice and toward DF were independent predictors of DV acceptance. CONCLUSION: The acceptance rate of the DV among inhabitants of Aceh, Indonesia was relatively high, and the strongest associated factors of higher support for the DV were a good attitude toward vaccination practices and a good attitude toward DF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27370066
[Au] Autor:Baytunca MB; Donuk T; Erermis S
[Ti] Title:Nöropsikiyatrik Bir Hastaligin Evrimi: PANDAS'tan PANS ve CANS'a. [Evaluation of a Neuropsychiatric Disorder: From PANDAS to PANS and CANS].
[So] Source:Turk Psikiyatri Derg;27(2):0, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1300-2163
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:tur
[Ab] Abstract:PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections) syndrome is a disorder seen before adolescence that possesses an abrupt onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and/or tics. Swedo and colleagues defined this disorder in 1998 as a syndrome related to Group A streptoccoccus (GAS) infection with neurological issues, such as motor hyperactivation and choreiform movements. The progress of the disorder may be described as wax-and-waning, apart from abrupt onset, and this relapse and remission course is associated with exacerbating infections, according to the creators of PANDAS syndrome. Ruling out of Rheumatoid Fever and Sydenham's Chorea was a necessity for making a proper diagnosis. Since the recognition of this syndrome, clinicians encountered many children who could not fulfill all 5 criteria, which must be met for PANDAS diagnosis. In addition, due to literature showing failure and lack of strong evidence of a major role of GAS, the newly-defined categories PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome) and CANS (Childhood Acute Neuropsychiatric Syndrome) were created to encompass those of "almost met" non-PANDAS cases. PANS and CANS include concurrent significant psychiatric symptoms with abrupt onset of OCD symptoms and/or tics but do not require identification of any infection agent, immune dysfunction, or enviromental precipitants. In this paper, we aimed to discuss PANS/ CANS, alterations of PANDAS, and diagnoses in which "almost met" PANDAS patients should be classified on the basis of a case who developed an abrupt onset of anxiety, obsessions, and vocal tics.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27279649
[Au] Autor:Lindgren C; Neuman MI; Monuteaux MC; Mandl KD; Fine AM
[Ad] Address:Division of Emergency Medicine and....
[Ti] Title:Patient and Parent-Reported Signs and Symptoms for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis.
[So] Source:Pediatrics;138(1), 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1098-4275
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Identifying symptomatic patients who are at low risk for group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis could reduce unnecessary visits and antibiotic use. The accuracy with which patients and parents report signs and symptoms of GAS has not been studied. Our objectives were to measure agreement between patient or parent and physician-reported signs and symptoms of GAS and to evaluate the performance of a modified Centor score, based on patient or parent and physician reports, for identifying patients at low risk for GAS pharyngitis. METHODS: Children 3 to 21 years old presenting to a single tertiary care emergency department between October 2013 and January 2015 were included if they complained of a sore throat and were tested for GAS. Patients or parents and physicians completed surveys assessing signs and symptoms to determine a modified age-adjusted Centor score for GAS. We evaluated the overall agreement and κ between patient or parent and physician-reported signs and symptoms and compared the performance of the scores based on assessments by patients or parents and physicians and the risk of GAS. RESULTS: Of 320 patients enrolled, 107 (33%) tested GAS positive. Agreement was higher for symptoms (fever [agreement = 82%, κ = 0.64] and cough [72%, 0.45]) than for signs (exudate [80%, 0.41] and tender cervical nodes [73%, 0.18]). Agreement was highest when no signs and symptoms contained in the Centor score were present (94%, κ = 0.61). The proportion of patients testing GAS positive rose as the modified Centor score increased. CONCLUSIONS: For identifying GAS pharyngitis, patients or parents and physicians showed moderate to substantial agreement for 3 of 4 key pharyngitis signs and symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27368040
[Au] Autor:Ng CJ; Liao PJ; Chang YC; Kuan JT; Chen JC; Hsu KH
[Ad] Address:aEmergency Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan bDepartment of Health Care Administration, Oriental Institute of Technology, New Taipei City cDepartment of Medical Education, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University dLaboratory for Epidemiology, Department of Health Care Management, and Healthy Aging Research Center, and Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(26):e4053, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered "nonurgent." Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients.A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000004053

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[PMID]: 27368035
[Au] Autor:Keng LT; Lin MW; Huang HN; Chung KP
[Ad] Address:aDepartments of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsinchu bDepartments of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei cDepartments of Pathology, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsinchu dDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Diffuse alveolar damage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis under prolonged leflunomide treatment: A Case Report and Literature Review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(26):e4044, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have pulmonary involvement, and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the primary manifestation, in which diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) is a rare histopathologic pattern. Leflunomide (LEF) is a frequently prescribed disease-modifying antirheumatic drug for treating RA. LEF-related ILD in the form of DAD has been reported in patients with RA, with the duration of LEF treatment before symptom onset ranging from 6 to 1204 days.We present a case of elderly woman with RA under prolonged LEF treatment for >9 years (3291 days), who had acute respiratory failure with the initial presentation of exertional dyspnea, fever, chills, and productive cough for 2 days. The histopathologic result of surgical lung biopsy was compatible with DAD. She was diagnosed as having LEF-related ILD, based on correlated clinical history, compatible histopathologic examination and excluding possible infection after extensive survey.Although the causative role of LEF cannot be confirmed, this case still hints that LEF-related DAD may occur even if LEF has been prescribed for a prolonged period.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000004044

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[PMID]: 27368001
[Au] Autor:Kato H; Sasaki S; Sekiya N
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(26):e3988, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Primary extraintestinal complications caused by Yersinia enterocolitica are extremely rare, especially in the form of skin and soft-tissue manifestations, and little is known about their clinical characteristics and treatments. We presented our case and reviewed past cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica. We report a case of primary cellulitis and cutaneous abscess caused by Y enterocolitica in an immunocompetent 70-year-old woman with keratodermia tylodes palmaris progressiva. She presented to an outpatient clinic with redness, swelling, and pain of the left ring finger and left upper arm without fever or gastrointestinal symptoms 3 days before admission. One day later, ulceration of the skin with exposed bone of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger developed, and cefditoren pivoxil was described. However, she was admitted to our hospital due to deterioration of symptoms involving the left finger and upper arm. Cefazolin was initiated on admission, then changed to sulbactam/ampicillin and vancomycin with debridement of the left ring finger and drainage of the left upper arm abscess. Wound culture grew Y enterocolitica serotype O:8 and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Blood cultures were negative and osteomyelitis was ruled out. Vancomycin was switched to ciprofloxacin, then skin and soft-tissue manifestations showed clear improvement within a few days. The patient received 14 days of ciprofloxacin and oral amoxicillin/clavulanate and has since shown no recurrence. We reviewed 12 cases of primary skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Y enterocolitica from the literature. In several past cases, portal entry involved failure of the skin barrier on distal body parts. Thereafter, infection might have spread to the regional lymph nodes from the ruptured skin. Y enterocolitica is typically resistant to aminopenicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins. In most cases, these inefficient antibiotic agents were initially prescribed, but patient conditions rapidly improved after implementing appropriate therapy and drainage. In addition, primary skin and soft-tissue infections occurred even in patients lacking risk factors. Physicians should consider the rare differential diagnosis of Y enterocolitica infection when seeing patients with deteriorating skin lesions under standard treatment, even if the patient is immunocompetent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000003988

  9 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27012985
[Au] Autor:Tanaka R; Fujisawa Y; Maruyama H; Nakamura Y; Yoshino K; Ohtsuka M; Fujimoto M
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki ryota621@hotmail.co.jp....
[Ti] Title:Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.
[So] Source:Jpn J Clin Oncol;46(6):575-9, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3621
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jjco/hyw036

  10 / 260389 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27134245
[Au] Autor:Liozon E; Dalmay F; Lalloue F; Gondran G; Bezanahary H; Fauchais AL; Ly KH
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Internal Medicine, Le centre hospitalier et universitaire (CHU) Limoges, Limoges, France.E. Liozon, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, CHU Limoges; F. Dalmay, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, CHU Limoges; F. Lalloue, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, CHU Limoges; G....
[Ti] Title:Risk Factors for Permanent Visual Loss in Biopsy-proven Giant Cell Arteritis: A Study of 339 Patients.
[So] Source:J Rheumatol;43(7):1393-9, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0315-162X
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk factors for permanent visual loss (PVL) in patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and the usefulness of the factors in clinical practice. METHODS: From 1976 through 2015, the clinical charts and laboratory results of 339 patients with biopsy-proven GCA were recorded prospectively at the time of diagnosis. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine which of 24 pretreatment characteristics were associated with PVL. RESULTS: Visual ischemic manifestations occurred in 108 patients, including PVL in 53 (16%), bilaterally in 15 patients (28%). The independent predictors associated with an increased risk of PVL were age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, p = 0.01), a history of transient visual ischemic symptoms (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.29-5.29, p < 0.01), and jaw claudication (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.09-4.10, p = 0.03). The presence of fever (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.14-0.64, p < 0.01) and rheumatic symptoms (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.10-0.57, p = 0.001) were associated with a markedly reduced risk of developing visual loss (3.7% if features were both present). No laboratory variables were independently associated with PVL. CONCLUSION: The visual ischemic risk of untreated GCA can be readily estimated upon simple clinical findings, but not laboratory variables. However, we did not identify a subgroup of patients carrying no risk of developing visual loss. Glucocorticoid treatment remains, therefore, urgent for any patient with a high clinical suspicion index.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3899/jrheum.151135


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