Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 25736861
[Au] Autor:Andriamandimby SF; Viarouge C; Ravalohery JP; Reynes JM; Sailleau C; Tantely ML; Elissa N; Cardinale E; Sall AA; Zientara S; Heraud JM
[Ad] Address:Virology Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar. Electronic address: soafy@pasteur.mg....
[Ti] Title:Detection in and circulation of Bluetongue virus among domestic ruminants in Madagascar.
[So] Source:Vet Microbiol;176(3-4):268-73, 2015 Apr 17.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2542
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:So far, no published data was available concerning the circulation of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in Madagascar. During a survey on Rift Valley Fever, we were able to detect a virus belonging to BTV. Therefore, we conducted a study aiming at characterizing molecularly the BTV isolated and assess the importance of circulation of BTV in Madagascar. A total of 4393 sera from ruminants selected randomly by stratification and sampled in 30 districts of Madagascar were tested for BTV. Moreover, 175 cattle were followed during 11 months. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from virus isolated from unfed pools of mosquitoes. Overall, the estimated mean seroprevalence of infection at the national level was 95.9% (95% CI: [95.2-96.5]) in cattle and 83.7% (95% CI: [81.4-85.9]) in small ruminants. Estimation of incidence rate was 54 per 100 cattle-years assuming that the incidence rate is constant all year along. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BTV detected belong to serotype 2. In conclusion, our results showed that BTV is endemic in Madagascar and highly prevalent among cattle. In our study we did not work on the vector involved in transmission of BTV in cattle. Thus, research should be conducted to better describe epidemiology of BTV in Madagascar including vectors and assess economic impact of the disease associated to BTV infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25769973
[Au] Autor:Scotti L; Ishiki H; Mendonca FJ; Da Silva MS; Scotti MT
[Ti] Title:In-silico Analyses of Natural Products on Leishmania Enzyme Targets.
[So] Source:Mini Rev Med Chem;15(3):253-69, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1875-5607
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Natural products are compounds that are isolated from plants, provide a variety of lead structures for the development of new drugs by the pharmaceutical industry. The interest in these substances increases because of their beneficial effects on human health, which include antiviral, antiallergic, antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, and antiparasitic activities. Leishmaniasis is the infection caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania, which affects mainly people who live in poor countries, and can cause chronic fever, liver problems, anemia, and other blood problems. Current chemotherapies against the disease cause side effects, and are ineffective. There are no vaccines, and new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of leishmaniasis are greatly needed. This work reports on some of the enzymatic targets studied in the development of new drugs using natural products as inhibitors for the treatment of leishmaniasis. We applied ligand-based-virtual screening using Random Forest, associated with structure-based-virtual screening (docking), of a small dataset of 683 flavonoids and derivatives from an in-house data bank to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against pyruvate kinase, an important enzyme in Leishmania mexicana's energy production chemistry. The computer-aided drug design studies revealed good results against Leishmaniasis for flavones.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24094501
[Au] Autor:Chuang PK; Wang SM; Lin HC; Cho YH; Ma YJ; Ho TS; Shen CF; Liu CC
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan....
[Ti] Title:The trend of macrolide resistance and emm types of group A streptococci from children at a medical center in southern Taiwan.
[So] Source:J Microbiol Immunol Infect;48(2):160-7, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1995-9133
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a common pathogen in children. Macrolide resistance in GAS has been described worldwide. The aims of this study are to analyze macrolide resistance of GAS isolates in southern Taiwan and to clarify the relationship of emm typing and macrolide resistance in the past decade. METHODS: All GAS isolated from patients younger than 18 years at a single tertiary center in southern Taiwan were collected from 2000 to 2012. Antibiotics susceptibility to erythromycin, azithromycin, and clindamycin were determined by agar dilution method, and were interpreted by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards. emm typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: A total of 301 isolates were collected during the period of 13 years. Scarlet fever (38.5%) and acute pharyngitis (32.2%) were the most common diagnosis. Decreased resistance rate of erythromycin from 53.1% in 2000 to 0% in 2010 was found, but it increased rapidly to 65% in 2011. The resistance rate of azithromycin was the lowest (4.2%) in 2005, but was higher than 15% after 2006. The involvement of the erythromycin resistance genes were mefA (53.1%), ermB (35.9%), and ermTR (10.9%). The resistance of clindamycin also increased since 2011. emm12 was the most common serotype and accounted for 44.9% of all isolates. Compared with the non-emm12 group, resistance to erythromycin, azithromycin, and clindamycin were more frequently detected in the emm12 group. CONCLUSION: Increased resistance of GAS to macrolide and clindamycin was found in recent years. emm12 was the main serotype for macrolide resistance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25704191
[Au] Autor:Zhong Y; Li M; Liu J; Zhang W; Peng F
[Ad] Address:Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 600, Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China....
[Ti] Title:Cryptococcal meningitis in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.
[So] Source:Clin Neurol Neurosurg;131:59-63, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6968
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic immunologic disorder that can affect multiple organ systems and makes the patient susceptible to infection. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a rare but often fatal complication of SLE. DESIGN: In this study, 6 patients with CM were identified among 631 patients with SLE. The demographic, clinical, laboratory profiles, serological features and outcomes of these 6 SLE patients with CM were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of these patients was 24.1 years (range 12-42) at the time of SLE diagnosis, and 27.1 years (range 14-42) at the time of Cryptococcus neoformans infection, with mean disease duration of 37 months (range 3-72). Four patients had active SLE. All patients were receiving glucocorticoids therapy (mean prednisone dose of 20.5 (5.0-36.0)mg/day) at the onset of infection. Five patients had received other immunosuppressive drugs. The most common presentations of CM were headache and fever and 4 of the 6 patients were normal on physical examination. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) indices (protein and glucose) were normal in 4 cases, whereas they were mildly abnormal in the other 2 patients. White counts in the CSF ranged from 8 to 240cells/mm. C. neoformans were isolated from CSF of 4 patients. The isolation of crytococci from extraneural sites, including blood and lungs, was found in 2 patients. Results of the head computed tomography scan were unremarkable in 5 of the patients. The infection was completely resolved in 5 patients, and it was resolved with serious sequelae in one patient. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the key to a rapid diagnosis of CM in patients with SLE is to maintain a high degree of awareness which will help avoid delays in treatment. This is mainly due to the fact that the clinical presentation and laboratory results from routine hematological, biochemical and CSF analyses of CM in patients with SLE are mostly non-specific.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25770294
[Au] Autor:Bachanova V; Frankel AE; Cao Q; Lewis D; Grzywacz B; Verneris MR; Ustun C; Lazaryan A; McClune B; Warlick ED; Kantarjian H; Weisdorf DJ; Miller JS; Vallera DA
[Ad] Address:Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota....
[Ti] Title:Phase I Study of a Bispecific Ligand-Directed Toxin Targeting CD22 and CD19 (DT2219) for Refractory B-cell Malignancies.
[So] Source:Clin Cancer Res;21(6):1267-72, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1078-0432
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The novel bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) DT2219 consists of a recombinant fusion between the catalytic and translocation enhancing domain of diphtheria toxin (DT) and bispecific single-chain variable fragments (scFV) of antibodies targeting human CD19 and CD22. We conducted a phase I dose-escalation study to assess the safety, maximum tolerated dose, and preliminary efficacy of DT2219 in patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell lymphoma or leukemia. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: DT2219 was administered intravenously over 2 hours every other day for 4 total doses. Dose was escalated from 0.5 µg/kg/day to 80 µg/kg/day in nine dose cohorts until a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients with mature or precursor B-cell lymphoid malignancies expressing CD19 and/or CD22 enrolled to the study. Patients received median 3 prior lines of chemotherapy and 8 failed hematopoietic transplantation. All patients received a single course of DT2219; one patient was retreated. The most common adverse events, including weight gain, low albumin, transaminitis, and fever were transient grade 1-2 and occurred in patients in higher dose cohorts (≥40 µg/kg/day). Two subjects experienced DLT at dose levels 40 and 60 µg/kg. Durable objective responses occurred in 2 patients; one was complete remission after 2 cycles. Correlative studies showed a surprisingly low incidence of neutralizing antibody (30%). CONCLUSIONS: We have determined the safety of a novel immunotoxin DT2219 and established its biologically active dose between 40 and 80 µg/kg/day ×4. A phase II study exploring repetitive courses of DT2219 is planned. Clin Cancer Res; 21(6); 1267-72. ©2015 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-2877

  6 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298315
[Au] Autor:Someya A; Ito R; Maeda A; Ikenaga M
[Ad] Address:Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Detection of rickettsial DNA in ticks and wild boars in Kyoto City, Japan.
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;77(1):37-43, 2015 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The tick is a well-known vector for arthropod-borne pathogens, such as tick-borne encephalitis, Lyme disease, Japanese spotted fever and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. It is therefore important to know the tick population and distribution in our environment and wild animals in order to prevent tick-borne diseases. Here, we report the results of tick surveillance from May to September 2011 at 14 geographical points and in 5 wild boars in Kyoto City, Kyoto prefecture, Japan. We collected 3,198 ticks comprising 5 tick species, Haemaphysalis (H.) longicornis, H. flava, H. kitaokai, Amblyomma testudinarium and Dermacentor taiwanensis. Interestingly, the proportion of tick species varied according to geographical region within the city. The ticks collected in the city were reported as potential vectors of pathogens, such as rickettsiosis. We detected rickettsial DNA by PCR in 71.1% of 201 ticks investigated. The ticks that carried rickettsiae were distributed across the whole the city. The sequences of PCR-amplified DNA fragments were determined and showed similarities to spotted fever group rickettsiae. Although their pathogenicity for animals including humans is still unclear, it is important to stay alert and pay attention to tick-borne diseases in order to ensure the safety of the citizens of the city as well as that of visitors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150314
[Lr] Last revision date:150314
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.14-0451

  7 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25763272
[Au] Autor:Tabatabaei A; Heidarzadeh A; Shamspour N; Kolivand P
[Ad] Address:Department of Education and Research, Hajj and Pilgrimage Medical Center, Tehran, IR Iran....
[Ti] Title:The efficacy of systemic corticosteroids in treatment of respiratory tract infections during hajj 2012.
[So] Source:Iran Red Crescent Med J;17(1):e12859, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2074-1804
[Cp] Country of publication:United Arab Emirates
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTI) in a mass-gathering situation such as hajj is a medical challenge that requires quick decision-making and considerable knowledge about its etiology and treatment methods. High prevalence of RTI during Hajj and tendency of caravan physicians to treat of patients quickly in such situation lead to prescription of parenteral steroids. Nonetheless, no study has focused on the short-term and long-term effects of systemic steroids in Hajj pilgrims with RTI. OBJECTIVES: This study focuses on efficacy of systemic consumption of corticosteroids in alleviating symptoms of RTI. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This clinical trial was included 1671 pilgrims in Hajj 2012 who had symptoms of RTI based on caravan physician's findings. The patients were divided to two groups to receive either parenteral corticosteroid or other drugs. Patients who received antibiotics for bacterial infections were excluded. This survey concentrated on general symptoms of RTI during Hajj such as fever, musculoskeletal pain, coryza, sore throat, cough, dyspnea, and hoarseness before, 24 hours after, and five days after drug consumption. For classification and analysis of data, SPSS 17 was used. Descriptive statistical and Chi square test were used to compare variables. RESULTS: In comparison to corticosteroid injection, treatment without systemic corticosteroids could reduce the fever more significantly within five days (P < 0.05), while it had no effect after 48 hours (P > 0.05). Although corticosteroids alleviated the symptoms during the first 48 hours (P > 0.05), they had no more effect after five days of consumption (P > 0.05). Treatment with medications other than corticosteroid had less effect on reducing coryza (P > 0.05) while corticosteroids had significant alleviating effect on coryza, cough, and musculoskeletal pain (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to conduct more comprehensive studies on effect of combination therapy with corticosteroids and antibiotics as well as their short-term and long-term adverse effects on the immune system. While injecting corticosteroids is commonly administered in patients with RTI, they are not recommended due to the lack of data on their long-term therapeutic and adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150314
[Lr] Last revision date:150314
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150312
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5812/ircmj.12859

  8 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25763077
[Au] Autor:Shahnazi M; Khatami A; Jamzad A; Shohitavi S
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Loghman-e Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Safety and Efficacy of Percutaneous CT-Guided Drainage in the Management of Abdominopelvic Abscess.
[So] Source:Iran J Radiol;11(3):e20876, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1735-1065
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Abdominopelvic fluid collection and abscess management and their outcomes have improved in the recent years due to innovation of the image-guided drainage technique and improvement of surgical procedures. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous drainage in treating abdominopelvic abscesses. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this study, the data of 41 patients who had abdominal abscess or fluid collections, and underwent treatment by percutaneous CT-guided drainage were analyzed. Treatment was assessed by reduction of collection size, relief of symptoms and signs including abdominal pain and fever and imaging findings. Any morbidity such as wound infection, sepsis, hematoma formation or peritonitis was followed up to six months after the procedure. RESULTS: The average age of the patients was 54 years (range 12 to 79), including 21 (51%) men and 20 (49%) women. The common signs and symptoms were pain (83%) and fever (80.5%). The most prevalent abdominal abscess etiology was previous surgery in 31 cases (75.5%). Abscess diameter ranged between 5 and 12 cm (mean, 7.8 cm). The average hospital stay was 8 days (4-15). Thirty five cases (86%) were successfully treated. Only one case (2.5%) developed complication (peritonitis) after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: According to our findings, CT-guided percutaneous drainage is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of abdominal abscess and fluid collection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150314
[Lr] Last revision date:150314
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150312
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5812/iranjradiol.20876

  9 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25762986
[Au] Autor:Silva VL; Lovaglio RB; Von Zuben CJ; Contiero J
[Ad] Address:Biochemistry and Microbiology, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho Rio Claro, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Rhamnolipids: solution against Aedes aegypti?
[So] Source:Front Microbiol;6:88, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1664-302X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the primary transmitters of dengue fever, urban yellow fever, and chikungunya viruses. This mosquito has developed resistance to the insecticides currently used to control their populations. These chemical insecticides are harmful to the environment and can have negative effects on human health. Rhamnolipids are environmentally compatible biological surfactants, but their insecticidal activity has not been extensively studied. The present study evaluated the potential larvicidal, insecticidal, and repellent activities of rhamnolipids against A. aegypti. At concentrations of 800, 900, and 1000 mg/L, rhamnolipids eliminated all mosquito larvae in 18 h and killed 100% of adults at 1000 mg/L. According to the results it may be conclude that rhamnolipids should be applied to control larvae and mosquitos besides present the repellency activity against A. aegypti.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150314
[Lr] Last revision date:150314
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150312
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2015.00088

  10 / 242404 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25763173
[Au] Autor:Tabandeh A; Besharat M
[Ad] Address:Assistant Professor, Gynecologist, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Infertility Research Center, Gorgan, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Fever after Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy; a case report from Gorgan, Iran.
[So] Source:Electron Physician;6(4):944-6, 2014 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2008-5842
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ectopic pregnancy is a rare condition, and, although its prevalence has decreased in recent years, it is still an important cause of mortality and morbidity in women. Cervical ectopic pregnancy is less than 1% of all ectopic pregnancies. Fever is one of signs of infection, and it is necessary to monitor patients closely for other signs of infection. This paper presents and discusses a case of cervical ectopic pregnancy with fever after treatment. The patient had a high fever that became worse after three hospitalizations. The probable cause of her pyelonephritis was a urinary catheter, although it had been removed earlier, and she was receiving antibiotic therapy. Even though cervical ectopic pregnancy is a rare condition, it has certain complications that must be managed appropriately.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150314
[Lr] Last revision date:150314
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150312
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.14661/2014.944-946


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