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[PMID]: 29524857
[Au] Autor:Hazir B; Haberal HB; Akinci D; Akdogan B
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address: berkhazir@hacettepe.edu.tr.
[Ti] Title:An unusual localization of seven months delayed pelvic lymphocele following radical retropubic prostatectomy: Case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Int J Surg Case Rep;44:181-184, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2210-2612
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: A pelvic lymphocele is a collection of lymphatic fluid that develops after extensive lymphadenectomies in surgeries such as urological malignancies or renal transplantation. Pelvic lymphoceles may cause complications such as fever, abdominal pain, leg swelling, genital swelling and flank pain. This report summarizes the management of a pelvic lymphocele after open radical retropubic prostatectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE: Herein, we present a case in which a pelvic lymphocele developed seven months post-radical open retropubic prostatectomy and through this patient we discussed the lymphocele following radical prostatectomy. The pelvic lymphocele occurred along the sciatic nerve from the sciatica foramen to the intergluteal muscles. The patient was treated with three drainage catheters. This localization is an atypical and unusual for lymphocele after radical retropubic prostatectomy. DISCUSSION: Lymphocele formation that leads to major complications after radical prostatectomy is rare. Lymphocele formation is most commonly seen in the early postoperative period, but it should be considered in patients with fever, abdominal pain or leg swelling during the late postoperative period. Lymphocele formation was the most common cause of hospital readmission after radical prostatectomy. CONCLUSION: Lymphocele formation can be seen in atypical regions and can lead to unexpected complications after radical prostatectomy. Therefore, it should be brought to mind when complaints such as fever and lower extremity swelling occurred in patients underwent extensive lymph node dissection. Surgical treatment options are available, but percutaneous interventions can also be used.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524758
[Au] Autor:Shahmohammadi S; Sahraian MA; Shahmohammadi A; Doosti R; Zare-Mirzaie A; Naser Moghadasi A
[Ad] Address:MS Research Center, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:A presentation of ulcerative colitis after rituximab therapy in a patient with multiple sclerosis and literature review.
[So] Source:Mult Scler Relat Disord;22:22-26, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2211-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most important demyelinating diseases that affects the central nervous system. Its treatment often involves a long-term disease modifying therapy. According to some studies, the prevalence of autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is higher in MS patients than in the normal population. There are also few studies that have reported the onset of UC after rituximab therapy. The present study presents a report of a 31-years old female patient suffering from aggressive multiple sclerosis, which developed into autoimmune hepatitis during the MS therapy. Thereafter, she received rituximab for the treating both MS and AIH. One week after the third cycle of rituximab (6 doses of 1000 mg), she experienced abdominal pain, fever, and severe bloody diarrhea; finally, she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). It seems that the administration of certain immunomodulators or immunosuppressive drugs may have a main role in the exacerbation of some autoimmune diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515750
[Au] Autor:Aradoini N; Talbi S; Azzouzi H; Abourazzak FZ; Khibri H; Berrady R; Bono W; Harzy T
[Ad] Address:Faculté de Médecine, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdallah, Service de Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hassan II, Fès, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Spondylarthrite ankylosante et maladie de Still: un lien physiopathologique ou une simple association? [Ankylosing spondylitis associated with Still's disease: should it be considered a pathophysiologic link or a simple association?]
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:132, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatism; it is part of the group of spondyloarthrites. General signs such as fever and weight loss are of little importance. Adult Still's disease is a rare systemic condition, a diagnosis of exclusion commonly characterized by high hectic fever, rash, arthritis and various systemic manifestations. Few cases of ankylosing spondylitis associated with adult Still's disease have been described in the literature. We here report the case of a 31-year old patient followed up for ankylosing spondylitis presenting with fever which had lasted for a long time and clinico-biological signs compatible with adult Still's disease. A possible pathophysiologic link between the two diseases may be suggested, even if their simultaneous occurrence has been rarely reported in the literature.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.132.5607

  4 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515741
[Au] Autor:Gueddari W; Sabri H; Chabah M
[Ad] Address:Service d'Accueil des Urgences Pédiatriques, Hôpital d'Enfants Abderrahim Harouchi, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Ibn Rochd, Casablanca, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Infections à méningocoque lors de purpura fébrile chez l'enfant dans un hôpital marocain: incidence et facteurs cliniques associés. [Meningococcal infections associated with febrile purpura among children hospitalized in a Moroccan Hospital: incidence and associated clinical factors].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:123, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Febrile purpura (FP) is suggestive of meningococcal disease, requiring almost always further investigations and a treatment based on broad spectrum antibiotics. This study aimed to determine the incidence of meningococcal infections as well as their associated clinical signs in children with febrile purpura hospitalized in the emergency department. Methods: We conducted a descriptive, retrospective study in the pediatric emergency department at the Children's Hospital of Casablanca over a period of 3 years. The hospitalized children with FP who had undergone bloodculture, whether or not associated with lumbar puncture, were included in the study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v.16 software. Results: We enrolled 96 children, 49 boys and 47 girls. The average age was 53.3 ± 40.5 months. Mean body temperature was 38.9°C. Meningococcal infection was diagnosed in 35/96 children. The diagnosis of meningococcemia was retained in 22 children, associated with meningitis in four patients. Symptoms and physical signs significantly associated with meningococcal infection included lethargy (p = 0.04), convulsions (p = 0.01) and purpura occurring outside the skin area drained by the superior vena cava (p = 0.01). Conclusion: FP occurring outside the skin area drained by the superior vena cava or associated with convulsions is srongly related to meningococcal infection, whose incidence seems to be high among Moroccan children.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.123.6089

  5 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510701
[Au] Autor:Kabaghe AN; Chipeta MG; McCann RS; Terlouw DJ; Tizifa T; Truwah Z; Phiri KS; van Vugt M
[Ad] Address:Center of Tropical Medicine and Travel Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. akabaghe@medcol.mw.
[Ti] Title:Access and adequate utilization of malaria control interventions in rural Malawi: a descriptive quantitative study.
[So] Source:Malar J;17(1):104, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2875
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of cost effective malaria control interventions, such as insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN), diagnosis and effective treatment of malaria, and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp), the lack of equitable access and coverage affect utilization of these interventions in rural communities. Aggregated rates of access and utilization of malaria interventions in national surveys mask substantial variations in intervention coverage. Utilization of interventions and factors affecting utilization need investigation in rural communities. METHODS: One year of quantitative data collected from a rolling Malaria Indicator Survey (April 2015-April 2016) in Chikhwawa District, Malawi, before the ITN distribution campaign, were analysed. Univariate analyses were used to quantify rates of ITN usage, care-seeking for fever in children aged 6-59 months and women aged 15-49 years and IPTp uptake (for women aged 15-49 years with a recent delivery). Results were compared to national survey estimates; factors associated with these outcomes were determined using multivariate regression models. RESULTS: A total of 2046 participants were included from 1328 households; 56.6% were women aged 15-49 years and 43.4% were children aged 6-59 months. Reported ownership of at least one ITN per household and under-five children ITN use the previous night were 35.3 and 33.5% compared to 70.2 and 67.1%, respectively, in the national survey; ITN use was higher in high wealth quintile households than low quintile ones. For participants with recent fever, 37.6 and 19.5% sought care and sought care within 24 h, respectively. Care-seeking was lower for febrile women than febrile children [aOR, 95% CI 0.53 (0.35-0.81)]. Uptake of two and three or more doses of IPTp were 40.6 and 15.0%, respectively, among women with a pregnancy in the last 2 years. CONCLUSION: To achieve effective malaria control, fine-scale or district-based surveillance should be used to identify and target communities requiring scaling up of interventions. Qualitative research and a participatory community approach should be used to address behavioural factors affecting how people make use of interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12936-018-2253-1

  6 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506574
[Au] Autor:Dalugama C; Gawarammana IB
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. chamaradalugama@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Fever with pancytopenia: unusual presentation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):58, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in the developing world. Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis is delayed because the presentation is nonspecific. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis can present with various hematological manifestations, including pancytopenia. Pancytopenia could be due to hypersplenism, maturation arrest, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or infiltration of the bone marrow by caseating or noncaseating granulomas causing reversible or irreversible fibrosis. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 56-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese man who presented with pyrexia of known origin with significant loss of weight and loss of appetite. He had mild pallor with mild hepatosplenomegaly. He had high inflammatory markers with pancytopenia in a peripheral blood smear. His chest radiograph was unremarkable, and he had a negative Mantoux test result. A diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis was made on the basis of caseating tuberculous granulomas in the bone marrow. CONCLUSIONS: Disseminated tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge because the presentation is vague and nonspecific. In case of pyrexia of unknown origin with peripheral cytopenia, the possibility of disseminated tuberculosis should be considered, particularly in endemic areas. Simultaneous culture and histopathological examination of the bone marrow is important in such instances, because results of common tests such as chest radiography or Mantoux tests can be negative.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1596-0

  7 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506499
[Au] Autor:Braun U; Warislohner S; Torgerson P; Nuss K; Gerspach C
[Ad] Address:Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057, Zurich, Switzerland. ubraun@vetclinics.uzh.ch.
[Ti] Title:Clinical and laboratory findings in 503 cattle with traumatic reticuloperitonitis.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):66, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The study evaluated the results of clinical examination and haematological and serum biochemical analyses in 503 cattle with traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP). RESULTS: The most common clinical findings were abnormal demeanour and general condition (87%), decreased rumen motility (72%), poorly digested faeces (57%), decreased rumen fill (49%), fever (43%) and tachycardia (26%). In 58% of the cattle, at least one of three tests for reticular foreign bodies (pinching of the withers, pressure on the xiphoid and percussion of the abdominal wall) was positive, and in 42% all three tests were negative. The most common haematological findings were decreased haematocrit in 45% of cattle and leukocytosis in 42%. An increase in the concentration of fibrinogen in 69% of cattle and total protein in 64% were the main biochemical findings. The glutaraldehyde test time was decreased with coagulation occurring within 6 min in 75% of cattle. CONCLUSIONS: In many cases, a diagnosis of TRP is not possible based on individual clinical or laboratory findings because even the most common abnormalities are not seen in all cattle with TRP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1394-3

  8 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491344
[Au] Autor:Pfirman KS; Haile R
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Education, Camden Clark Medical Center, Parkersburg, WV, USA.
[Ti] Title:Intracardiac Abscess and Pacemaker Lead Infection Secondary to Hematogenous Dissemination of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus from a Prior Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Osteomyelitis.
[So] Source:Am J Case Rep;19:224-228, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1941-5923
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Intracardiac abscesses are an unusual occurrence in developed countries. With the increase in use of implantable cardiac devices, the increase use of and advancements in antibiotics, and the longevity of patients with cardiac devices, one may expect an increase in such infections; however, case reports are rare. We are presenting a case in which hematogenous dissemination of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection from a lower extremity diabetic ulcer propagated into an infected pacemaker lead and ultimately an intracardiac abscess of the right atrium. CASE REPORT A 77-year-old male with a history of MSSA diabetic foot infection complicated by osteomyelitis presented with fever, syncope, and wide complex tachycardia, and he was found to have an intracardiac abscess and fibrinous lead vegetations. The patient was deemed too ill for invasive surgical intervention given his comorbidities, pacemaker generator replacement requirement, and intermittent ventricular tachycardia. The patient was subsequently sent home with oral antibiotics and home hospice per patient and family wishes. CONCLUSIONS This case demonstrated how hematogenous dissemination of MSSA infections from a diabetic foot ulcer and osteomyelitis can seed pacemaker hardware resulting in an intracardiac abscess. Unfortunately, our patient was too ill to undergo all procedures required to eradicate the abscess and infected pacemaker hardware. The standard of care would be complete hardware removal. Conservative management would include indefinite or prolonged antibiotic therapy, with the notion that intracardiac abscesses cannot be cured with antibiotics alone. This conservative management approach would be deemed necessary in a select population that cannot undergo surgical intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29427710
[Au] Autor:Khan A; Saleemi MK; Ali F; Abubakar M; Hussain R; Abbas RZ; Khan IA
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-38040, Pakistan. Electronic address: ahrar1122@uaf.edu.pk.
[Ti] Title:Pathophysiology of peste des petits ruminants in sheep (Dorper & Kajli) and goats (Boer & Beetal).
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:139-147, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), an economically important viral transboundary disease of small ruminants is not only prevalent in Pakistan but also in other countries where people rely on agriculture and animal products. The present study was aimed at describing the pathology and antigen localization in natural PPR infections in local (Kajli sheep; Beetal goats) as well as imported small ruminant breeds (Dorper sheep; Australian Boer goat). Morbidity and mortality rates were significantly (P < 0.001) higher in indigenous Kajli sheep (75.37 and 32.80%) and Beetal goats (81.10 and 37.24%) as compared to Dorper sheep (6.99 and 1.48%) and Australian Boer goat (5.01 and 2.23%). Affected animals exhibited high fever, severe diarrhea, abdominal pain, respiratory distress and nodular lesions on lips and nostrils. Thick mucous discharge was oozing out from nostrils. On necropsy, lungs were congested and pneumonic, with nodular and cystic appearance. Intestines were hemorrhagic with zebra stripping. Characteristic histopathological lesions of PPR were noted in intestines, lymphoid organs and lungs. In GI tract, stunting and blunting of villi, necrotic enteritis, and infiltration of mononuclear cells in duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Small intestines exhibited diffuse edema of the submucosa along with proliferation of fibrocytes leading to thickened submucosa which has not been reported previously. Lymphoid organs showed partial to complete destruction of lymphoid follicles. Lesions of the respiratory tract included depictive of bronchopneumonia, severe congestion of trachea and apical lobe of lungs with deposition of fibrinous materials. Histopathological lesions of respiratory tract were severe and characteristic of broncho-interstitial pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, interstitial pneumonia and fibrinous pneumonia. The alveoli were filled with edematous fluid mixed with fibrinous exudate, numerous alveolar macrophages, mononuclear cells along with thickened interalveolar septa and presence of intranuclear eosinophilic inclusion bodies. One-Step RT-PCR using NP3 and NP4 primers confirmed a PPR virus of 352 bp size in spleen, lungs and mesenteric and brachial lymph node samples. It was concluded that morbidity and mortality due to PPR were significantly higher in indigenous breeds of sheep and goat as compared to imported sheep and goat breeds. PPR has rendered various lesions in GI and respiratory tract which are characteristic in nature for the diagnosis of the disease under field condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 293332 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29331320
[Au] Autor:Luo H; Winkelmann ER; Fernandez-Salas I; Li L; Mayer SV; Danis-Lozano R; Sanchez-Casas RM; Vasilakis N; Tesh R; Barrett AD; Weaver SC; Wang T
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.
[Ti] Title:Zika, dengue and yellow fever viruses induce differential anti-viral immune responses in human monocytic and first trimester trophoblast cells.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;151:55-62, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus associated with severe neonatal birth defects, but the causative mechanism is incompletely understood. ZIKV shares sequence homology and early clinical manifestations with yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue virus (DENV) and are all transmitted in urban cycles by the same species of mosquitoes. However, YFV and DENV have been rarely reported to cause congenital diseases. Here, we compared infection with a contemporary ZIKV strain (FSS13025) to YFV17D and DENV-4 in human monocytic cells (THP-1) and first-trimester trophoblasts (HTR-8). Our results suggest that all three viruses have similar tropisms for both cells. Nevertheless, ZIKV induced strong type 1 IFN and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, ZIKV infection in trophoblasts induced lower IFN and higher inflammatory immune responses. Placental inflammation is known to contribute to the risk of brain damage in preterm newborns. Inhibition of toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR8 each abrogated the inflammatory cytokine responses in ZIKV-infected trophoblasts. Our findings identify a potential link between maternal immune activation and ZIKV-induced congenital diseases, and a potential therapeutic strategy that targets TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in the placenta.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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