Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Fever [Words]
References found : 235312 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 23532 go to page                         

  1 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24456030
[Au] Autor:Oei W; Kretzschmar ME; Zaaijer HL; Coutinho R; van der Poel CL; Janssen MP
[Ad] Address:University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Estimating the transfusion transmission risk of Q fever.
[So] Source:Transfusion;54(7):1705-11, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The Q fever outbreaks in the Netherlands in 2007 to 2009 initiated discussion on the necessity of measures to prevent transmission through blood products. Risk assessments help transfusion regulators decide when and where measures are required. This study assesses the transfusion transmission (TT) risk of Q fever using the European Up-Front Risk Assessment Tool (EUFRAT) model. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We estimated the number of Q fever infections in recipients during the 2007 to 2009 outbreaks' peaks using selected notification data; estimates are calculated from the probability of a donor being infected. We compared this probability to the prevalence of infection estimated from an independent donation testing study and using the Biggerstaff model. We also quantified the risk reduction by implementing measures such as donation testing and donor deferral. RESULTS: At the peak of the 2007, 2008, and 2009 outbreaks, there were an estimated 0.21, 0.96, and 1.59 recipients infected with Q fever, respectively. Between June 1, 2009, and January 31, 2010, the probability of a donor being infected with Q fever in the high-incidence areas was estimated at 260 (95% confidence interval, 192-340) per 100,000 donors, consistent with results from the donation testing study. The EUFRAT estimates were also consistent with estimates from the Biggerstaff model. Scenario analyses showed that donation testing provided the largest risk reduction of various risk reduction strategies. CONCLUSION: The TT risk of Q fever during the 2007 to 2009 outbreaks was small, a result that is consistent with results of other studies. EUFRAT can be applied successfully to support decision making during outbreaks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.12539

  2 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24888579
[Au] Autor:Garcia-Ispierto I; Tutusaus J; López-Gatius F
[Ad] Address:Agrotecnio Centre, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Does Coxiella burnetii Affect Reproduction in Cattle? A Clinical Update.
[So] Source:Reprod Domest Anim;49(4):529-35, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0531
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Q fever is a zoonosis produced by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that is widely distributed worldwide. Domestic ruminants are the most important source of C. burnetii for human infection. In sheep and goats, abortion is the main clinical consequence of infection, yet the symptoms described in cattle have so far been inconsistent. Q fever has been also scarcely reported in cattle, most likely because of its difficult diagnosis at the farm level and because of the many existing responsible C. burnetii strains. In this report, the effects of C. burnetii infection or Q fever disease on the reproductive behaviour of dairy cattle are reviewed, with special emphasis placed on the scarcity of data available and possible control actions discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/rda.12333

  3 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25045337
[Au] Autor:Shafferman A; Birmingham JD; Cron RQ
[Ad] Address:University of Alabama School of Medicine, 1720 2nd Avenue South FOT 1203, Birmingham, AL 35294-3412, UK.
[Ti] Title:High dose anakinra for treatment of severe neonatal Kawasaki disease: a case report.
[So] Source:Pediatr Rheumatol Online J;12:26, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1546-0096
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an 11-week-old female who presented with Kawasaki disease (KD) complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). The infant presented to the hospital with persistent fever, cough, diarrhea, and emesis, among other symptoms. Her condition quickly began to decompensate, and she developed classic features (conjunctivitis, rash, cracked lips, distal extremity edema) prompting a diagnosis of acute KD. The patient was treated with standard therapy for KD including three doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), aspirin, and high dose glucocorticoids with no change in her condition. Due to a high suspicion for MAS, high dose anakinra therapy was initiated resulting in dramatic clinical improvements. She also received one dose of infliximab for concern for coronary artery changes, and over the course of several months, anakinra and high dose glucocorticoids were tapered. Nearly complete reversal of echocardiogram changes were observed after 8 months, and the infant is now off all immunosuppressive therapy. In this case report, we briefly review the importance of early recognition of MAS in pediatric patient populations with rheumatic diseases, and we suggest early initiation of anakinra therapy as a rapid and effective treatment option.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1546-0096-12-26

  4 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24719212
[Au] Autor:Coate EA; Kocsis AG; Peters KN; Anderson PE; Ellersieck MR; Fine DM; Anderson DM
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Regional Biocontainment Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Remote monitoring of the progression of primary pneumonic plague in Brown Norway rats in high-capacity, high-containment housing.
[So] Source:Pathog Dis;71(2):263-73, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2049-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics for biodefense or other relatively rare infectious diseases is hindered by the lack of naturally occurring human disease on which to conduct clinical trials of efficacy. To overcome this experimental gap, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the Animal Rule, in which efficacy testing in two well-characterized animal models that closely resemble human disease may be accepted in lieu of large-scale clinical trials for diseases with limited natural human incidence. In this report, we evaluated the Brown Norway rat as a model for pneumonic plague and describe the natural history of clinical disease following inhalation exposure to Yersinia pestis. In high-capacity, high-containment housing, we monitored temperature, activity, heart rate, and rhythm by capturing electronic impulses transmitted from abdominal telemeter implants. Using this system, we show that reduced activity and development of fever are sensitive indications of disease progression. Furthermore, we identified heart arrhythmias as contributing factors to the rapid progression to lethality following the fever response. Together, these data validate the Brown Norway rat as an experimental model for human pneumonic plague and provide new insight that may ultimately lead to novel approaches in postexposure treatment of this devastating infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/2049-632X.12176

  5 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24532259
[Au] Autor:Reed DS; Bethel LM; Powell DS; Caroline AL; Hartman AL
[Ad] Address:Center for Vaccine Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies.
[So] Source:Pathog Dis;71(2):225-31, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2049-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies. Spray factor (SF), the ratio between the concentrations of the aerosolized agent to the agent in the aerosol generator, is used to compare performance differences between aerosol exposures. SF indicates the efficiency of the aerosolization process; a higher SF means a lower nebulizer concentration is needed to achieve a desired inhaled dose. Relative humidity levels as well as the duration of the exposure and choice of exposure chamber all impacted RVFV SF. Differences were also noted between actual and predicted minute volumes for different species of nonhuman primates. While NHP from Old World species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) generally had a lower actual minute volume than predicted, the actual minute volume for marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was higher than predicted (150% for marmosets compared with an average of 35% for all other species examined). All of these factors (relative humidity, chamber, duration, and minute volume) impact the ability to reliably and reproducibly deliver a specific dose of aerosolized RVFV. The implications of these findings for future pivotal efficacy studies are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/2049-632X.12157

  6 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24453160
[Au] Autor:Powell DS; Walker RC; Heflin DT; Fisher D; Kosky JB; Homer LC; Reed DS; Stefano-Cole K; Trichel AM; Hartman AL
[Ad] Address:Regional Biocontainment Laboratory, Center for Vaccine Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Development of novel mechanisms for housing, handling, and remote monitoring of common marmosets at animal biosafety level 3.
[So] Source:Pathog Dis;71(2):217-24, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2049-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The use of common marmosets as an alternative non-human primate model for infectious disease research using BSL-3 viruses such as Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) presents unique challenges with respect to housing, handling, and safety. Subject matter experts from veterinary care, animal husbandry, biosafety, engineering, and research were consulted to design a pilot experiment using marmosets infected with RVFV. This paper reviews the caging, handling, and safety-related adaptations and modifications that were required to humanely utilize marmosets as a model for high-hazard BSL-3 viral diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/2049-632X.12140

  7 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25045453
[Au] Autor:Nateghian A; Robinson J; Vosough P; Navidinia M; Malekan M; Mehrvar A; Sobouti B; Bahadoran P; Gholinejad Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran....
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Antimicrobial Sensitivity to Older and Newer Quinolones versus Piperacillin-Tazobactam, Cefepime and Meropenem in Febrile Patients with Cancer in two Referral Pediatric Centers in Tehran, Iran.
[So] Source:Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis;6(1):e2014045, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2035-3006
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Infection in pediatric cancer patients has become a concerning problem due to increasing antimicrobial resistance. The goal of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of blood isolates from pediatric oncology patients in Iran to determine if there was significant resistance to quinolones. METHODS: Children with cancer who were admitted with or developed fever during admission to Aliasghar Children's Hospital or Mahak Hospitals July 2009 through June 2011 were eligible for enrollment. Two blood cultures were obtained. Antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed for ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, meropenem, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam on isolates from children who were bacteremic. RESULTS: Blood cultures were positive for 38 episodes in 169 enrolled children but 9 episodes were excluded as blood cultures were thought to be contaminated, yielding a bacteremia rate of 29/160 (18%). The mean age of children and the stage of malignancy did not differ between those with and without bacteremia. Meropenem was the most likely antibiotic to cover isolates (97%) with cefepime having the lowest coverage rate (21%). Quinolone coverage ranged from 63% to 76%. CONCLUSION: Quinolones may not be suitable for use as empiric therapy in febrile pediatric oncology patients in Iran.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4084/MJHID.2014.045

  8 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25045448
[Au] Autor:Kim JS; Lee S; Lee KW; Kim JM; Kim YH; Kim ME
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Relationship between uncommon computed tomography findings and clinical aspects in patients with acute pyelonephritis.
[So] Source:Korean J Urol;55(7):482-6, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6745
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Computed tomography (CT) has become popular in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) and its related complications in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between uncommon CT findings and clinical and laboratory data in patients with APN. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From July 2009 to July 2012, CT findings and clinical data were collected from 125 female patients with APN. The six uncommon CT findings (excluding a wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion in the renal parenchyma) studied were perirenal fat infiltration, ureteral wall edema, renal abscess formation, pelvic ascites, periportal edema, and renal scarring. The clinical parameters analyzed were the age and body mass index of the patients as well as the degree and duration of fever. Laboratory parameters related to inflammation and infection included white blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, pyuria, and bacteriuria. RESULTS: The most common CT finding was perirenal fat infiltration (69 cases, 55%). A longer duration of fever, higher CRP level, and grade of pyuria were related with perirenal fat infiltration (p=0.010, p=0.003, and p=0.049, respectively). The CRP level was significantly higher in patients with renal abscess and ureteral wall edema (p=0.005 and p=0.015, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The uncommon CT findings that were related to aggravated clinical and laboratory parameters of APN patients were perirenal fat infiltration, ureteral wall edema, and renal abscess formation. The inflammatory reaction and tissue destruction may be more aggressive in patients with these CT findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4111/kju.2014.55.7.482

  9 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25045365
[Au] Autor:Kim JE; Lee EK; Lee JM; Bae SH; Choi KH; Lee YH; Hah JO; Choi JH; Kong EJ; Cho IH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease mimicking malignant lymphoma with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in children.
[So] Source:Korean J Pediatr;57(5):226-31, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:1738-1061
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD) is a benign disease, which is characterized by a cervical lymphadenopathy with fever, and it often mimics malignant lymphoma (ML). 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) is a powerful imaging modality for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of ML, with the limitations including the nonspecific FDG uptake in infectious or inflammatory processes. This study compared clinical manifestations and PET/CT findings between KFD and ML patients. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 23 patients with KFD and 33 patients with ML, diagnosed histopathologically, between January 2000 and May 2013 at the Department of Pediatrics, Yeungnam University Medical Center. Among them, we analyzed the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and characteristics, and the amount of (18)F-FDG uptake between 8 KFD and 9 ML patients who had (18)F-FDG PET/CT. RESULTS: The (18)F-FDG PET/CT maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) ranged from 8.3 to 22.5 (mean, 12.0) in KFDs, and from 5.8 to 34.3 (mean, 15.9) in MLs. There were no significant differences in SUVmax between KFDs and MLs. (18)F-FDG PET/CT with ML patients showed hot uptakes in the extranodal organs, such as bone marrow, small bowel, thymus, kidney, orbit and pleura. However, none of the KFD cases showed extranodal uptake (P<0.001). (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings of KFD with nodal involvement only were indistinguishable from those of ML. CONCLUSION: Patients who had extranodal involvement on PET/CT were more likely to have malignancy than KFD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3345/kjp.2014.57.5.226

  10 / 235312 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25045291
[Au] Autor:Jun CH; Kim KR; Yoon JH; Koh HR; Choi WS; Cho KM; Lim SU; Park CH; Joo YE; Kim HS; Choi SK; Rew JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Clinical outcomes of gastric variceal obliteration using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in patients with acute gastric variceal hemorrhage.
[So] Source:Korean J Intern Med;29(4):437-44, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6648
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC; Histoacryl) for treatment of bleeding gastric varices. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 455 patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage (GVH) who were consecutively treated with NBC from January 2004 to July 2013, with a mean follow-up period of 582 days. The patients' endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis, complications, rebleeding rates, and bleeding-related death rates were reviewed. RESULTS: Hemostasis was achieved initially in 96.9% (441/455) of patients; rebleeding occurred in 35.2% (160/455), and the bleeding-related death rate was 6.8% (31/455) during follow-up. Complications included fever (6.8%), abdominal pain (3.7%), diarrhea (1.3%), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (0.7%), bacteremia (0.4%), and embolism (0.2%). A red-color sign on concomitant esophageal varices (EVs) (p = 0.002) and previous history of variceal bleeding (p < 0.001) were significant risk factors for rebleeding within 1 year. The Child-Pugh score (p < 0.001), presence of hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.001), and failure of initial hemostasis (p < 0.001) were the risk factors most closely associated with bleeding-related death. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a comprehensive overview of the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients with GVH. The results may help in the selection of effective treatment strategies for patients with GVH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3904/kjim.2014.29.4.437


page 1 of 23532 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information