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[PMID]: 24952104
[Au] Autor:Iwasa T; Matsuzaki T; Tungalagsuvd A; Munkhzaya M; Kawami T; Niki H; Kato T; Kuwahara A; Uemura H; Yasui T; Irahara M
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Institute of Health Biosciences, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-Cho, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan. Electronic address: iwasa.takeshi@tokushima-u.ac.jp....
[Ti] Title:Hypothalamic Kiss1 and RFRP gene expressions are changed by a high dose of lipopolysaccharide in female rats.
[So] Source:Horm Behav;66(2):309-16, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6867
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Reproductive function is suppressed by several types of stress. Hypothalamic kisspeptin, which is a product of the Kiss1 gene, and GnIH/RFRP have pivotal roles in the regulation of GnRH and gonadotropins through their receptors Kiss1r and GPR147 in many species. However, alterations of these factors under stress conditions have not been fully evaluated. This study investigated the mechanisms of immune stress-induced reproductive dysfunction, especially focusing on the changes of Kiss1 and RFRP gene expression. Serum LH levels and hypothalamic Kiss1 and GnRH mRNA levels were decreased, while hypothalamic RFRP and GPR147 mRNA levels were increased by administration of a high dose of LPS (5mg/kg) in both ovariectomized and gonadal intact female rats. In this condition, Kiss1 and/or RFRP mRNA levels were positively and negatively correlated with GnRH expression, respectively. In contrast, hypothalamic Kiss1, RFRP, and GPR147 mRNA levels were not changed by administration of a moderate dose of LPS (500µg/kg) in ovariectomized rats. Rats with high-dose LPS injection showed more prolonged fever responses and severe anorexia compared with rats with moderate-dose LPS injection, indicating that more energy was used for the immune response in the former. These results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of dysfunction of gonadotropin secretion are changed according to the severity of immune stress, and that changes of some reserved factors, such as kisspeptin and RFRP, begin to participate in the suppression of GnRH and gonadotropin in severe conditions. As reproduction needs a large amount of energy, dysfunction of gonadotropin secretion under immune stress may be a biophylatic mechanism by which more energy is saved for the immune response.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24931669
[Au] Autor:Hsu CW; Yeh CT
[Ad] Address:Liver Research Center, Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Ribozyme-independent replication of a defective hepatitis D virus RNA derived from hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;450(1):616-21, 2014 Jul 18.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Novel hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA mutants carrying large fragment deletions were identified in the serum samples of two hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy. Sequence analysis revealed that the deleted regions encompassed both ribozyme domains. The mutant persisted in the serum samples for at least 2 and 10 months, respectively in the two patients, raising the question of whether such mutants could replicate in the absence of ribozyme domains. Thirty anti-HDV antibody-positive serum samples derived from 17 patients receiving antiviral therapy were submitted for RT-PCR detection of HDV RNA deletion mutants. Large fragment HDV RNA deletions were found in 4 patients. Of them, two had liver biopsy samples available. Northern blot analysis revealed high molecular weight HDV RNA replication intermediates, genomic and anti-genomic senses, in the liver tissues. Transfection of an in vitro transcribed HDV RNA deletion mutant (1.28 kb) into Huh7 and HepG2 cells also resulted in generation of high molecular weight HDV RNA species in the hepatoma cells (>6.5 kb) with secretion of a 6.5 kb HDV RNA species into the medium. In conclusion, we discovered novel large fragment deletion mutants of HDV RNA in hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy. Such mutants did not contain ribozyme domains but could replicate in the liver cells to generate high molecular weight but not unit-length HDV RNA.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use
Hepatitis B/virology
Hepatitis D/virology
Hepatitis Delta Virus/genetics
RNA, Catalytic/genetics
RNA, Viral/genetics
Virus Replication/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Base Sequence
Hepatitis B/genetics
Hepatitis D/genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Mutation/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (RNA, Catalytic); 0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23816281
[Au] Autor:Kizito D; Tweyongyere R; Namatovu A; Webb EL; Muhangi L; Lule SA; Bukenya H; Cose S; Elliott AM
[Ad] Address:Co-infection Studies Programme, MRC/UVRI Uganda Research Unit on AIDS, Uganda Virus Research Institute, PO BOX 49, Entebbe, Uganda. dennison.kizito@mrcuganda.org
[Ti] Title:Factors affecting the infant antibody response to measles immunisation in Entebbe-Uganda.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;13:619, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vaccine failure is an important concern in the tropics with many contributing elements. Among them, it has been suggested that exposure to natural infections might contribute to vaccine failure and recurrent disease outbreaks. We tested this hypothesis by examining the influence of co-infections on maternal and infant measles-specific IgG levels. METHODS: We conducted an observational analysis using samples and data that had been collected during a larger randomised controlled trial, the Entebbe Mother and Baby Study (ISRCTN32849447). For the present study, 711 pregnant women and their offspring were considered. Helminth infections including hookworm, Schistosoma mansoni and Mansonella perstans, along with HIV, malaria, and other potential confounding factors were determined in mothers during pregnancy and in their infants at age one year. Infants received their measles immunisation at age nine months. Levels of total IgG against measles were measured in mothers during pregnancy and at delivery, as well as in cord blood and from infants at age one year. RESULTS: Among the 711 pregnant women studied, 66% had at least one helminth infection at enrolment, 41% had hookworm, 20% M. perstans and 19% S. mansoni. Asymptomatic malaria and HIV prevalence was 8% and 10% respectively. At enrolment, 96% of the women had measles-specific IgG levels considered protective (median 4274 mIU/ml (IQR 1784, 7767)). IgG levels in cord blood were positively correlated to maternal measles-specific IgG levels at delivery (r = 0.81, p < 0.0001). Among the infants at one year of age, median measles-specific IgG levels were markedly lower than in maternal and cord blood (median 370 mIU/ml (IQR 198, 656) p < 0.0001). In addition, only 75% of the infants had measles-specific IgG levels considered to be protective. In a multivariate regression analysis, factors associated with reduced measles-specific antibody levels in infancy were maternal malaria infection, infant malaria parasitaemia, infant HIV and infant wasting. There was no association with maternal helminth infection. CONCLUSION: Malaria and HIV infection in mothers during pregnancy, and in their infants, along with infant malnutrition, may result in reduction of the antibody response to measles immunisation in infancy. This re-emphasises the importance of malaria and HIV control, and support for infant nutrition, as these interventions may have benefits for vaccine efficacy in tropical settings.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/immunology
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/immunology
Malaria/immunology
Measles Vaccine/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Antibody Formation
Female
HIV Infections/complications
Humans
Immunization
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/complications
Malaria/complications
Male
Measles/immunology
Measles/prevention & control
Measles Vaccine/administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic/immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Specimen Handling
Uganda/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Measles Vaccine)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130806
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-13-619

  4 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25220212
[Au] Autor:Oh JZ; Ravindran R; Chassaing B; Carvalho FA; Maddur MS; Bower M; Hakimpour P; Gill KP; Nakaya HI; Yarovinsky F; Sartor RB; Gewirtz AT; Pulendran B
[Ad] Address:Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA; Yerkes National Primate Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA....
[Ti] Title:TLR5-Mediated Sensing of Gut Microbiota Is Necessary for Antibody Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination.
[So] Source:Immunity;41(3):478-92, 2014 Sep 18.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Systems biological analysis of immunity to the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in humans revealed a correlation between early expression of TLR5 and the magnitude of the antibody response. Vaccination of Trl5(-/-) mice resulted in reduced antibody titers and lower frequencies of plasma cells, demonstrating a role for TLR5 in immunity to TIV. This was due to a failure to sense host microbiota. Thus, antibody responses in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice were impaired, but restored by oral reconstitution with a flagellated, but not aflagellated, strain of E. coli. TLR5-mediated sensing of flagellin promoted plasma cell differentiation directly and by stimulating lymph node macrophages to produce plasma cell growth factors. Finally, TLR5-mediated sensing of the microbiota also impacted antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine, but not to adjuvanted vaccines or the live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine. These results reveal an unappreciated role for gut microbiota in promoting immunity to vaccination.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25232463
[Au] Autor:Velu AR; Srinivasamurthy BC; Nagarajan K; Sinduja I
[Ad] Address:Ambedkar Raj Kulandai Velu, Banushree C Srinivasamurthy, Department of Pathology, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry 605107, India....
[Ti] Title:Colonic adenocarcinoma, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and tuberculosis in a segment of colon: A case report.
[So] Source:World J Gastrointest Oncol;6(9):377-80, 2014 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1948-5204
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Synchronous occurrence of adenocarcinoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of colon is rare, and its presence with coexisting tuberculosis is still rarer. To our knowledge, this may be the first case report. In the present report, we describe a 43-year-old female who presented with a history of abdominal pain, fever, loss of weight and loss of appetite. Colonoscopy showed a large ulceroproliferative mass arising from the caecum, biopsy of which showed it to be adenocarcinoma of the colon. A right hemicolectomy was performed and microscopic study of the colon revealed tuberculosis and synchronous adenocarcinoma with lymphoma. Eight of sixteen lymph nodes showed tuberculosis and three of sixteenpericoloniclymphnodes showed metastatic deposits. Immunostains further confirmed the tumour to be adenocarcinoma with MALT lymphoma. We would like to highlight the diagnostic challenges arising from the multi-faceted presentations of these three conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 140920
[Lr] Last revision date:140920
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140918
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4251/wjgo.v6.i9.377

  6 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25232385
[Au] Autor:Odabasi M; Arslan C; Akbulut S; Abuoglu HH; Ozkan E; Yildiz MK; Eris C; Gunay E; Tekesin K; Muftuoglu T
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Haydarpasa Education and Research Hospital 34688, Istanbul, Turkey....
[Ti] Title:Long-term effects of forgotten biliary stents: a case series and literature review.
[So] Source:Int J Clin Exp Med;7(8):2045-52, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1940-5901
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are many studies about the biliary stents, however there is a little information about the long-term stayed forgotten biliary stents except a few case reports. We have reported the results of a number of cases with biliary stents that were forgotten or omitted by the patient and the endoscopist. During February 2010 to May 2013, five patients were referred to the general surgery clinic of Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul Turkey. Past history and medical documents submitted by the patient did not indicate a replacement of the biliary stent in 3 patients. Two patients knew that they had biliary stents. We also conducted a literature review via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases of English language studies published until March 2014 on forgotten biliary stent. There were 3 men and 2 women ranging in age from 22 to 68 years (mean age 41.6 years). Patients presented with pain in the upper abdomen, jaundice, fever, abnormal liver function tests or dilatation of the biliary tract alone or in combination. Patients' demographic findings are presented in Table 1. A review of three cases reported in the English medical literature also discussed. The mean duration of the patency of the stent is about 12 months. The biliary stenting is performed either with plastic or metal stents, studies recommending their replacement after 3-6 months. Patients with long stayed forgotten biliary stents are inevitably treated with surgical intervention. We recommend for all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography units provide a stent registry system that the stents placed for various therapeutic procedures are not forgotten both by the patient as well as the physician. There should be a deadline for biliary stents in the registry system for each patient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 140920
[Lr] Last revision date:140920
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140918
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  7 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25232331
[Au] Autor:Valles JM; Fekete R
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, N.Y., USA.
[Ti] Title:Gradenigo syndrome: unusual consequence of otitis media.
[So] Source:Case Rep Neurol;6(2):197-201, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:1662-680X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In 1904, Giuseppe Gradenigo published his case series on the triad of ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy, facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution, and suppurative otitis media, which would subsequently be referred to as Gradenigo syndrome. CASE REPORT: Our patient was a 36-year-old female, 23 weeks pregnant, with a 6-day history of right-sided otalgia and hearing loss and a 4-day history of purulent otorrhea, who presented with severe, holocephalic headache, meningeal signs, fever, photophobia, and mental status decline. Lumbar puncture yielded a white blood cell count of 1,559 cells/mm(3) with 95% polymorphonuclear leukocytes, a red blood cell count of 111 cells/mm(3), a protein level of 61 mg/dl, and a glucose level of <40 mg/dl. Cerebrospinal fluid Gram stain showed Gram-positive diplococci, which were subsequently identified as Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with ceftriaxone. On the second hospital day, she developed horizontal diplopia due to right abducens nerve palsy and right mydriasis. Both symptoms resolved on the third hospital day. Erosion of temporal bone and opacification of mastoid air cells was shown on CT scan. A CT venogram showed an irregularity of the left transverse and superior sagittal sinuses. She was treated with enoxaparin for possible sinus thrombosis. DISCUSSION: This case demonstrates rare but serious sequelae of otitis media and Gradenigo syndrome. Holocephalic headache from meningitis masked trigeminal pain. Involvement of the ipsilateral petrous apex and surrounding structures on imaging and clinical improvement with antibiotic treatment supports Gradenigo syndrome over intracranial hypertension due to venous sinus thrombosis as the cause of the abducens nerve palsy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 140920
[Lr] Last revision date:140920
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140918
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000365843

  8 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25211074
[Au] Autor:Laurent-Rolle M; Morrison J; Rajsbaum R; Macleod JM; Pisanelli G; Pham A; Ayllon J; Miorin L; Martínez-Romero C; tenOever BR; García-Sastre A
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA; Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA....
[Ti] Title:The Interferon Signaling Antagonist Function of Yellow Fever Virus NS5 Protein Is Activated by Type I Interferon.
[So] Source:Cell Host Microbe;16(3):314-27, 2014 Sep 10.
[Is] ISSN:1934-6069
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To successfully establish infection, flaviviruses have to overcome the antiviral state induced by type I interferon (IFN-I). The nonstructural NS5 proteins of several flaviviruses antagonize IFN-I signaling. Here we show that yellow fever virus (YFV) inhibits IFN-I signaling through a unique mechanism that involves binding of YFV NS5 to the IFN-activated transcription factor STAT2 only in cells that have been stimulated with IFN-I. This NS5-STAT2 interaction requires IFN-I-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and the K63-linked polyubiquitination at a lysine in the N-terminal region of YFV NS5. We identified TRIM23 as the E3 ligase that interacts with and polyubiquitinates YFV NS5 to promote its binding to STAT2 and trigger IFN-I signaling inhibition. Our results demonstrate the importance of YFV NS5 in overcoming the antiviral action of IFN-I and offer a unique example of a viral protein that is activated by the same host pathway that it inhibits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24103895
[Au] Autor:Englund JA; Karron RA; Cunningham CK; Larussa P; Melvin A; Yogev R; Handelsman E; Siberry GK; Thumar B; Schappell E; Bull CV; Chu HY; Schaap-Nutt A; Buchholz U; Collins PL; Schmidt AC; International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) P1096 Study Group
[Ad] Address:Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, United States. Electronic address: janet.englund@seattlechildrens.org.
[Ti] Title:Safety and infectivity of two doses of live-attenuated recombinant cold-passaged human parainfluenza type 3 virus vaccine rHPIV3cp45 in HPIV3-seronegative young children.
[So] Source:Vaccine;31(48):5706-12, 2013 Nov 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Live-attenuated cold-adapted HPIV3 vaccines have been evaluated in infants but a suitable interval for administration of a second dose of vaccine has not been defined. METHODS: HPIV3-seronegative children between the ages of 6 and 36 months were randomized 2:1 in a blinded study to receive two doses of 105 TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious dose) of live-attenuated, recombinant cold-passaged human PIV3 vaccine (rHPIV3cp45) or placebo 6 months apart. Serum antibody levels were assessed prior to and approximately 4-6 weeks after each dose. Vaccine virus infectivity, defined as detection of vaccine-HPIV3 in nasal wash and/or a≥4-fold rise in serum antibody titer, and reactogenicity were assessed on days 3, 7, and 14 following immunization. RESULTS: Forty HPIV3-seronegative children (median age 13 months; range 6-35 months) were enrolled; 27 (68%) received vaccine and 13 (32%) received placebo. Infectivity was detected in 25 (96%) of 26 evaluable vaccinees following doses 1 and 9 of 26 subject (35%) following dose 2. Among those who shed virus, the median duration of viral shedding was 12 days (range 6-15 days) after dose 1 and 6 days (range 3-8 days) after dose 2, with a mean peak log10 viral titer of 3.4 PFU/mL (SD: 1.0) after dose 1 compared to 1.5 PFU/mL (SD: 0.92) after dose 2. Overall, reactogenicity was mild, with no difference in rates of fever and upper respiratory infection symptoms between vaccine and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: rHPIV3cp45 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in seronegative young children. A second dose administered 6 months after the initial dose was restricted in those previously infected with vaccine virus; however, the second dose boosted antibody responses and induced antibody responses in two previously uninfected children.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Parainfluenza Vaccines/adverse effects
Parainfluenza Vaccines/immunology
Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human/immunology
Respirovirus Infections/prevention & control
Vaccination/adverse effects
Vaccination/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antibodies, Viral/blood
Child, Preschool
Double-Blind Method
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/epidemiology
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/pathology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Nasal Cavity/virology
Parainfluenza Vaccines/administration & dosage
Parainfluenza Vaccines/genetics
Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human/genetics
Placebos/administration & dosage
Respirovirus Infections/virology
Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage
Vaccines, Attenuated/adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics
Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology
Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects
Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics
Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Parainfluenza Vaccines); 0 (Placebos); 0 (Vaccines, Attenuated); 0 (Vaccines, Synthetic)
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Cu] Class update date: 140920
[Lr] Last revision date:140920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131104
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 237140 MEDLINE  
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SciELO Public Health full text

[PMID]: 25237798
[Au] Autor:Mastrangelo A; Tagliabue P; Berro L; De Carolis D; Sinchi A; Digilio C; Enria D
[Ad] Address:ANLIS, CeNDIE, CONICET, Argentina....
[Ti] Title:Estudio cualicuantitativo de las variables sociales que definen escenarios de transmisión de la fiebre hemorrágica argentina en las provincias de Buenos Aires y Santa Fe, 2001-2010. [Quali-quantitative study of the social variables defining transmission scenarios of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever in the provinces of Buenos Aires and Santa Fe, 2001-2010].
[So] Source:Salud Colect;10(2):171-84, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1851-8265
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this paper was to characterize transmission scenarios of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever in the post-vaccination period (2001-2010). The study was made up of three phases. The first consisted of a quantitative analysis using the database of the Dr. Julio I. Maiztegui National Institute of Human Viral Diseases [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Virales Humanas] regarding the confirmed cases in the period of study (221 cases). Taking into account the transmission site and the known endemic area, cases were grouped into three hypothetical transmission scenarios, identified as: a) classical, b) emerging-reemerging, c) traveling. In the second phase, in order to test these hypotheses, in-depth interviews were carried out from August to September 2011 within an intentionally selected sample of patients distributed proportionally among the three hypotheses. Finally, in the third stage, the data obtained for each hypothetical scenario were grouped into three spatiotemporal scales: the microscale (subject), the mesoscale (locality) and macroscale (region). The results show that new transmission sites are associated with the social dynamics of cereal production and port-bound routes.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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