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[PMID]: 25473199
[Au] Autor:Yang XX; Lin JM; Xu KJ; Wang SQ; Luo TT; Geng XX; Huang RG; Jiang N
[Ad] Address:Xing-Xiang Yang, Jian-Mei Lin, Kai-Ju Xu, Shu-Qiang Wang, Ting-Ting Luo, Xiao-Xia Geng, Ren-Gang Huang, Nan Jiang, Department of Infectious Disease, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China....
[Ti] Title:Hepatic actinomycosis: Report of one case and analysis of 32 previously reported cases.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(43):16372-6, 2014 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hepatic actinomycosis is rare, with few published cases. There are no characteristic clinical manifestations, and computed tomography (CT) shows mainly low-density images, making clinical diagnosis difficult, and leading to frequent misdiagnosis as primary liver cancer, metastatic liver cancer or liver abscess. Diagnosis normally requires examination of both the aetiology and pathology. This article reports one male patient aged 55 who was hospitalized because of repeated upper abdominal pain for more than 2 mo. He exhibited no chills, fever or yellow staining of the skin and sclera, and examination revealed no positive signs. The routine blood results were: haemoglobin 110 g/L, normal numbers of leukocytes and neutral leukocytes, serum albumin 32 g/L, negative serum hepatitis B markers and hepatitis C antibodies, normal tumour markers (alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen). An abdominal CT scan revealed an 11.2 cm × 5.8 cm × 7.4 cm mass with an unclear edge in the left liver lobe. The patient was diagnosed as having primary liver cancer, and left lobe resection was performed. The postoperative pathological examination found multifocal actinomycetes in the hepatic parenchyma, which was accompanied by chronic suppurative inflammation. A focal abscess had formed, and large doses of sodium penicillin were administered postoperatively as anti-infective therapy. This article also reviews 32 cases reported in the English literature, with the aim of determining the clinical features and treatment characteristics of this disease, and providing a reference for its diagnosis and treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i43.16372

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[PMID]: 25473196
[Au] Autor:Takahashi M; Ohara M; Kimura N; Domen H; Yamabuki T; Komuro K; Tsuchikawa T; Hirano S; Iwashiro N
[Ad] Address:Mizuna Takahashi, Masanori Ohara, Hiromitsu Domen, Takumi Yamabuki, Kazuteru Komuro, Nozomu Iwashiro, Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Hakodate Hospital, Hakodate 041-8512, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(43):16359-63, 2014 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40  °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i43.16359

  3 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25460594
[Au] Autor:Laoprasopwattana K; Chaimongkol W; Pruekprasert P; Geater A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand....
[Ti] Title:Acute respiratory failure and active bleeding are the important fatality predictive factors for severe dengue viral infection.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(12):e114499, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of severe dengue viral infection (DVI) and the main dengue fatality risk factors. STUDY DESIGN: The medical records of patients aged <15 years admitted to Songklanagarind Hospital in southern Thailand during 1989-2011 were reviewed. Patients who had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) grades III-IV, organ failure (cardiovascular, respiratory, liver, renal or hematologic), impaired consciousness, or aspartate aminotransferase more than 1,000 units/L, were classified as having severe DVI. To determine the fatality risk factors of severe DVI, the classification trees were constructed based on manual recursive partitioning. RESULTS: Of the 238 children with severe DVI, 30 (12.6%) died. Compared to the non-fatal DVI cases, the fatal cases had higher rates of DHF grade IV (96.7% vs 24.5%), repeated shock (93.3% vs 27.9%), acute respiratory failure (ARF) (100% vs 6.7%), acute liver failure (ALF) (96.6% vs 6.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (79.3% vs 4.5%), and active bleeding requiring blood transfusion (93.3% vs 5.4%), all p<0.01. The combined risk factors of ARF and active bleeding considered together predicted fatal outcome with sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 0.93 (0.78-0.99), 0.97 (0.93-0.99), 0.99 (0.97-1.00), and 0.82 (0.65-0.93), respectively. The likelihood ratios for a fatal outcome in the patients who had and did not have this risk combination were 32.4 (14.6-71.7) and 0.07 (0.02-0.26), respectively. CONCLUSION: Severe DVI patients who have ARF and active bleeding are at a high risk of death, while patients without these things together should survive.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0114499

  4 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25437856
[Au] Autor:Talla C; Diallo D; Dia I; Ba Y; Ndione JA; Sall AA; Morse A; Diop A; Diallo M
[Ad] Address:Unité d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Dakar, Sénégal; Laboratoire d'Etudes et de Recherches en Statistiques et Développement, Université Gaston Berger, Saint-Louis, Sénégal....
[Ti] Title:Statistical modeling of the abundance of vectors of west african rift valley Fever in barkédji, senegal.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(12):e114047, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever is an emerging mosquito-borne disease that represents a threat to human and animal health. The exophilic and exophagic behavior of the two main vector in West Africa (Aedes vexans and Culex poicilipes), adverse events post-vaccination, and lack of treatment, render ineffective the disease control. Therefore it is essential to develop an information system that facilitates decision-making and the implementation of adaptation strategies. In East Africa, RVF outbreaks are linked with abnormally high rainfall, and can be predicted up to 5 months in advance by modeling approaches using climatic and environmental parameters. However, the application of these models in West Africa remains unsatisfactory due to a lack of data for animal and human cases and differences in the dynamics of the disease emergence and the vector species involved in transmission. Models have been proposed for West Africa but they were restricted to rainfall impact analysis without a spatial dimension. In this study, we developed a mixed Bayesian statistical model to evaluate the effects of climatic and ecological determinants on the spatiotemporal dynamics of the two main vectors. Adult mosquito abundance data were generated from July to December every fortnight in 2005-2006 at 79 sites, including temporary ponds, bare soils, shrubby savannah, wooded savannah, steppes, and villages in the Barkédji area. The results demonstrate the importance of environmental factors and weather conditions for predicting mosquito abundance. The rainfall and minimum temperature were positively correlated with the abundance of Cx. poicilipes, whereas the maximum temperature had negative effects. The rainfall was negatively correlated with the abundance of Ae. vexans. After combining land cover classes, weather conditions, and vector abundance, our model was used to predict the areas and periods with the highest risks of vector pressure. This information could support decision-making to improve RVF surveillance activities and to implement better intervention strategies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0114047

  5 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25436614
[Au] Autor:Yeka A; Lameyre V; Afizi K; Fredrick M; Lukwago R; Kamya MR; Talisuna AO
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Uganda Malaria Surveillance Program, Kampala, Uganda....
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and Safety of Fixed-Dose Artesunate-Amodiaquine vs. Artemether-Lumefantrine for Repeated Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria in Ugandan Children.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(12):e113311, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The safety and efficacy of the two most widely used fixed-dose artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT), artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are well established for single episodes of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the effects of repeated, long-term use are not well documented. We conducted a 2-year randomized, open-label, longitudinal, phase IV clinical trial comparing the efficacy and safety of fixed-dose ASAQ and AL for repeated treatment of uncomplicated malaria in children under 5 years at Nagongera Health Centre, Uganda. Participants were randomized to ASAQ or AL and all subsequent malaria episodes were treated with the same regimen. 413 children were enrolled and experienced a total of 6027 malaria episodes (mean 15; range, 1-26). For the first malaria episode, the PCR-corrected-cure rate for ASAQ (97.5%) was non-inferior to that for AL (97.0%; 95% CI [-0.028; 0.037]). PCR-corrected cure rates for subsequent malaria episodes that had over 100 cases (episodes 2-18), ranged from 88.1% to 98.9% per episode, with no clear difference between the treatment arms. Parasites were completely cleared by day 3 for all malaria episodes and gametocyte carriage was less than 1% by day 21. Fever clearance was faster in the ASAQ group for the first episode. Treatment compliance for subsequent episodes (only first dose administration observed) was close to 100%. Adverse events though common were similar between treatment arms and mostly related to the disease. Serious adverse events were uncommon, comparable between treatment arms and resolved spontaneously. Anemia and neutropenia occurred in <0.5% of cases per episode, abnormal liver function tests occurred in 0.3% to 1.4% of cases. Both regimens were safe and effective for repeated treatment of malaria. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials NCT00699920.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0113311

  6 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25423309
[Au] Autor:Sulyok KM; Hornok S; Abichu G; Erdélyi K; Gyuranecz M
[Ad] Address:Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary....
[Ti] Title:Identification of Novel Coxiella burnetii Genotypes from Ethiopian Ticks.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(11):e113213, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is a highly infectious zoonotic bacterium. Genetic information about the strains of this worldwide distributed agent circulating on the African continent is limited. The aim of the present study was the genetic characterization of C. burnetii DNA samples detected in ticks collected from Ethiopian cattle and their comparison with other genotypes found previously in other parts of the world. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 296 tick samples were screened by real-time PCR targeting the IS1111 region of C. burnetii genome and from the 32 positive samples, 8 cases with sufficient C. burnetii DNA load (Amblyomma cohaerens, n = 6; A. variegatum, n = 2) were characterized by multispacer sequence typing (MST) and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). One novel sequence type (ST), the proposed ST52, was identified by MST. The MLVA-6 discriminated the proposed ST52 into two newly identified MLVA genotypes: type 24 or AH was detected in both Amblyomma species while type 26 or AI was found only in A. cohaerens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both the MST and MLVA genotypes of the present work are closely related to previously described genotypes found primarily in cattle samples from different parts of the globe. This finding is congruent with the source hosts of the analyzed Ethiopian ticks, as these were also collected from cattle. The present study provides genotype information of C. burnetii from this seldom studied East-African region as well as further evidence for the presumed host-specific adaptation of this agent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0113213

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[PMID]: 25425236
[Au] Autor:Cheng Z; Lin M; Rikihisa Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ehrlichia chaffeensis Proliferation Begins with NtrY/NtrX and PutA/GlnA Upregulation and CtrA Degradation Induced by Proline and Glutamine Uptake.
[So] Source:MBio;5(6), 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: How the obligatory intracellular bacterium Ehrlichia chaffeensis begins to replicate upon entry into human monocytes is poorly understood. Here, we examined the potential role of amino acids in initiating intracellular replication. PutA converts proline to glutamate, and GlnA converts glutamate to glutamine. E. chaffeensis PutA and GlnA complemented Escherichia coli putA and glnA mutants. Methionine sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor, inhibited E. chaffeensis GlnA activity and E. chaffeensis infection of human cells. Incubation of E. chaffeensis with human cells rapidly induced putA and glnA expression that peaked at 24 h postincubation. E. chaffeensis took up proline and glutamine but not glutamate. Pretreatment of E. chaffeensis with a proline transporter inhibitor (protamine), a glutamine transporter inhibitor (histidine), or proline analogs inhibited E. chaffeensis infection, whereas pretreatment with proline or glutamine enhanced infection and upregulated putA and glnA faster than no treatment or glutamate pretreatment. The temporal response of putA and glnA expression was similar to that of NtrY and NtrX, a two-component system, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed specific binding of recombinant E. chaffeensis NtrX (rNtrX) to the promoter regions of E. chaffeensis putA and glnA. Furthermore, rNtrX transactivated E. chaffeensis putA and glnA promoter-lacZ fusions in E. coli. Growth-promoting activities of proline and glutamine were also accompanied by rapid degradation of the DNA-binding protein CtrA. Our results suggest that proline and glutamine uptake regulates putA and glnA expression through NtrY/NtrX and facilitates degradation of CtrA to initiate a new cycle of E. chaffeensis growth. IMPORTANCE: Human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) is one of the most prevalent, life-threatening emerging infectious zoonoses in the United States. HME is caused by infection with E. chaffeensis, an obligatory intracellular bacterium in the order Rickettsiales, which includes several category B/C pathogens, such as those causing Rocky Mountain spotted fever and epidemic typhus. The limited understanding of the mechanisms that control bacterial growth within eukaryotic cells continues to impede the identification of new therapeutic targets against rickettsial diseases. Extracellular rickettsia cannot replicate, but rickettsial replication ensues upon entry into eukaryotic host cells. Our findings will provide insights into a novel mechanism of the two-component system that regulates E. chaffeensis growth initiation in human monocytes. The result is also important because little is known about the NtrY/NtrX two-component system in any bacteria, let alone obligatory intracellular bacteria. Our findings will advance the field's current conceptual paradigm on regulation of obligatory intracellular nutrition, metabolism, and growth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25366210
[Au] Autor:Sharma RK; Raghavendra N; Mohanty S; Tripathi BK; Gupta B; Goel A
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Clinical & biochemical profile of trichinellosis outbreak in north India.
[So] Source:Indian J Med Res;140(3):414-9, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0971-5916
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Trichinellosis is a parasitic infection caused by Trichinella nematodes, acquired from consumption of raw meat. However, data from Indian subcontinent are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and biochemical profile of a suspected trichinellosis outbreak in a village in Tehri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand state in north India. METHODS: Three index cases presenting as acute febrile myalgia syndrome with eosinophilia, after consumption of uncooked pork in a common feast, were confirmed as trichinellosis on muscle biopsy. A detailed epidemiological survey was carried out in the affected community and all the people who participated in the feast were investigated for clinical and biochemical profile. RESULTS: A total of 54 patients were evaluated in the study. The type of pork consumed included uncooked in 24 per cent (n=13), open fire roasted in 39 per cent (n=21) and fried in 37 per cent (n=20). Clinical symptoms were found in those who consumed pork in uncooked or open fire roasted form (n=34). These included fever with chills and myalgia (100%), periorbital oedema (67%), dyspnoea (9%), and dysphagia (3%). Laboratory parameters studied in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients showed eosinophilia in 90 per cent (n=41), raised ESR in 98 per cent (n=45), and an elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) level in 85 per cent (n=39). All symptomatic patients were treated with a short course of oral steroids and albendazole therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Trichinella infection is not uncommon in India, and should be suspected in case of acute febrile myalgia especially in areas, where habits of consumption of raw meat is more prevalent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25159197
[Au] Autor:Radzimanowski J; Effantin G; Weissenhorn W
[Ad] Address:University Grenoble Alpes, UVHCI, F-38000, Grenoble, France; CNRS, UVHCI, F-38000, Grenoble, France.
[Ti] Title:Conformational plasticity of the Ebola virus matrix protein.
[So] Source:Protein Sci;23(11):1519-27, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1469-896X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Filoviruses are the causative agents of a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever with repeated outbreaks in Africa. They are negative sense single stranded enveloped viruses that can cross species barriers from its natural host bats to primates including humans. The small size of the genome poses limits to viral adaption, which may be partially overcome by conformational plasticity. Here we review the different conformational states of the Ebola virus (EBOV) matrix protein VP40 that range from monomers, to dimers, hexamers, and RNA-bound octamers. This conformational plasticity that is required for the viral life cycle poses a unique opportunity for development of VP40 specific drugs. Furthermore, we compare the structure to homologous matrix protein structures from Paramyxoviruses and Bornaviruses and we predict that they do not only share the fold but also the conformational flexibility of EBOV VP40.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141206
[Lr] Last revision date:141206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/pro.2541

  10 / 239248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25323541
[Au] Autor:Sveikata A; Gumbrevicius G; Sestakauskas K; Kregzdyte R; Janulionis V; Fokas V
[Ad] Address:Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medicial Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. Electronic address: audrius.sveikata@lsmuni.lt....
[Ti] Title:Comparison of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of two recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor formulations after single subcutaneous administration to healthy volunteers.
[So] Source:Medicina (Kaunas);50(3):144-9, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1648-9144
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized, single dose, two-period crossover study with two weeks wash-out period was the demonstration of bioequivalence of two recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) formulations after subcutaneous administration of 300µg comparing their pharmacokinetic (primary endpoints AUC0-24, AUC0-∞ and Cmax) and pharmacodynamic (primary endpoints ANC AUC0-72, ANC AUC0-∞ and ANCmax) profiles in healthy male subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 36 (23.0±6.0 years, 76.6±7.2kg) healthy subjects were recruited. Using a 1:1 randomization ratio, subjects were randomly assigned to one of two possible treatment-sequence groups to receive the single dose of test formulation (Gp-02) and reference product (Neupogenâ„¢) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) up to 24h and the Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) was determined using hematology analyzer Coulter STKSâ„¢ (Beckman Coulter) up to 72h after injection. The geometric mean of primary pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables were considered bioequivalent if the 90% confidence intervals (CI) would fall in the bioequivalence range of 80%-125%. RESULTS: AUC0-24 (ratio of means 103.4, 90% CI: 95.6-111.9), AUC0-∞ (103.4, 90% CI: 95.7-111.7), Cmax (99.6, 90% CI: 89.0-111.4), ANC AUC0-72 (100.0, 90% CI: 96.6-103.5), ANC AUC0-∞ (100.8, 90% CI: 96.5-105.3), and ANCmax (100.2, 90% CI: 95.4-105.1) were determined. Single doses of test and reference formulations were well tolerated. The incidence of AEs was equally distributed across treatment groups with the most frequent AEs being headache, fever, and back pain. CONCLUSIONS: The study results demonstrated the bioequivalence of Gp-02, a new formulation of filgrastim, and the reference product Neupogenâ„¢.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process


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