Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Fever and of and Unknown and Origin [Words]
References found : 6145 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 615 go to page                         

  1 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29506574
[Au] Autor:Dalugama C; Gawarammana IB
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. chamaradalugama@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Fever with pancytopenia: unusual presentation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):58, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in the developing world. Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis is delayed because the presentation is nonspecific. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis can present with various hematological manifestations, including pancytopenia. Pancytopenia could be due to hypersplenism, maturation arrest, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or infiltration of the bone marrow by caseating or noncaseating granulomas causing reversible or irreversible fibrosis. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 56-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese man who presented with pyrexia of known origin with significant loss of weight and loss of appetite. He had mild pallor with mild hepatosplenomegaly. He had high inflammatory markers with pancytopenia in a peripheral blood smear. His chest radiograph was unremarkable, and he had a negative Mantoux test result. A diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis was made on the basis of caseating tuberculous granulomas in the bone marrow. CONCLUSIONS: Disseminated tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge because the presentation is vague and nonspecific. In case of pyrexia of unknown origin with peripheral cytopenia, the possibility of disseminated tuberculosis should be considered, particularly in endemic areas. Simultaneous culture and histopathological examination of the bone marrow is important in such instances, because results of common tests such as chest radiography or Mantoux tests can be negative.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1596-0

  2 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29518869
[Au] Autor:Zhang Y; Zeng XJ
[Ti] Title:[A disease that is easily overlooked in elderly patients with fever of unknown origin].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi;57(3):221-222, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:0578-1426
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1426.2018.03.014

  3 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28457513
[Au] Autor:Bonsignore A; Orcioni GF; Barranco R; De Stefano F; Ravetti JL; Ventura F
[Ad] Address:University of Genova, Department of Legal and Forensic Medicine, Via De Toni 12, Genova 16132, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Fatal disseminated histoplasmosis presenting as FUO in an immunocompetent Italian host.
[So] Source:Leg Med (Tokyo);25:66-70, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4162
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Histoplasmosis is a relatively rare infectious disease endemic to certain geographic areas such as East Africa, eastern and central United States, western Mexico, Central and South America. Disseminated histoplasmosis has been reported mainly in immunocompromised hosts and in AIDS patients. In this paper we report on a fatal case of undiagnosed disseminated histoplasmosis presenting as fever of unknown origin (FUO) in a 43-year-old Italian woman who, although splenectomized 5years earlier due to a motor vehicle accident, was otherwise immunocompetent. This case report highlights the fact that, even in Europe, histoplasmosis is an emerging sporadic infection which needs be considered in the differential diagnosis of given clinical scenarios. The proposed case is of blatant forensic concern as it addresses the hypothesis of professional responsibility due to a missed diagnosis of histoplasmosis. A timely diagnosis, with appropriate therapies, could have prevented death. The role of the forensic pathologist is also crucial because the post-mortem diagnosis of histoplasmosis (never considered in the differential diagnosis during prior hospitalization) highlights the importance of a meticulous and thorough autopsy to elucidate the cause of death.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Delayed Diagnosis
Fever of Unknown Origin/diagnosis
Histoplasmosis/diagnosis
Histoplasmosis/pathology
Immunocompromised Host
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Autopsy
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Italy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29490685
[Au] Autor:Zerkaoui M; Laarabi FZ; Ajhoun Y; Chkirate B; Sefiani A
[Ad] Address:Human Genomic Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco. maria.zerkaoui@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A novel single variant in the MEFV gene causing Mediterranean fever and Behçet's disease: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):53, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Familial Mediterranean fever is an autoinflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized clinically by recurrent attacks of sudden-onset fever with arthralgia and/or thoracoabdominal pain and pathogenetically by autosomal recessive inheritance due to a mutation in the MEFV gene. Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcerations, uveitis, and skin lesions. Preliminarily, our literature review suggested that patients with familial Mediterranean fever who also have Behçet's disease have only a single mutated familial Mediterranean fever gene. The MEFV gene mutation responsible for familial Mediterranean fever is probably a susceptibility factor for Behçet's disease, particularly for patients with vascular involvement, and both disorders can occur concurrently in a patient, as in the present case. CASE PRESENTATION: A 10-year-old girl of Moroccan origin presented to our institution for genetic consultation for genetic testing of the MEFV gene. She had fever associated with abdominal and diffuse joint pain in addition to headache. These symptoms have oriented pediatricians to familial Mediterranean fever. The evolution was marked by Behçet's syndrome symptoms. Sanger sequencing followed by complete exome sequencing analysis of the MEFV gene for the proband mutation revealed a novel variant. We conclude that the novel single variant c.2078 T > A (p.Met693Lys) could be responsible for the association of familial Mediterranean fever and Behçet's disease. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a new variant in exon 10 of the MEFV gene in a Moroccan family. This novel variant should be listed in the MEFV sequence variant databases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1552-4

  5 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29423567
[Au] Autor:Kochanek M; Piepereit A; Böll B; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen A; Hallek M
[Ad] Address:Medizinische Klinik I für Innere Medizin, Klinikum der Universität Köln, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937, Köln, Deutschland. matthias.kochanek@uk-koeln.de.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostisches Management von Fieber. [Diagnostic management of fever].
[So] Source:Internist (Berl);59(3):218-226, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1289
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Fever is a symptom of a wide range of diseases. Its diagnostic management is of crucial importance, whereby the interface between general practitioner and hospital plays an important role. The family practitioner is of particular importance in the detection of life-threatening or complex situations involving fever. The diagnostic algorithm presented here can serve as the basis for rapid and targeted diagnostics. Good communication between the doctor and the hospital doctor is mandatory.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00108-018-0383-8

  6 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29500522
[Au] Autor:Kostik MM; Suspitsin EN; Guseva MN; Levina AS; Kazantseva AY; Sokolenko AP; Imyanitov EN
[Ad] Address:Saint-Petersburg State Pediatric Medical University, Litovskaya 2, Saint-Petersburg, 194100, Russian Federation. kost-mikhail@yandex.ru.
[Ti] Title:Multigene sequencing reveals heterogeneity of NLRP12-related autoinflammatory disorders.
[So] Source:Rheumatol Int;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1437-160X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:NLRP12-related autoinflammatory disease (NLRP12-AID) is an exceptionally rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by germline mutations in NLRP12 gene. Very few patients with NLRP12-AD have been identified worldwide; therefore, there is a scarcity of data on phenotypic presentation of this syndrome. Here we provide evidence that NLRP12-AID may have clinical manifestations characteristic for primary immune deficiencies (PID). 246 children with periodic fever (PF) of unknown origin were subjects to the next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis; 213 of these patients had signs of primary immunodeficiency (PID) manifested by recurrent infections, while 33 kids had isolated PF. The NGS panel was composed of 302 genes implicated in PID and/or AID. 15 patients (9 girls and 6 boys) with NLRP12-AID were identified. Median age of first AID-related fever episode was 12 months, ranging from 2 months to 13 years. Main clinical features of NLRP12-related AID were periodic fever (100%), abdominal pain and diarrhea (47%), arthralgia (20%), headache (20%) and failure to thrive (33%). Nine patients demonstrated increased susceptibility to infection and two children suffered from Crohn's disease. Administration of short courses of NSAID or corticosteroids resulted in resolution of the disease flare. In one severe case, canakinumab (anti-interleukin-1ß antibody) was successfully used. Significant number of patients with genetically assigned diagnosis of NLPR12-AID has clinical features which close resemble primary immune deficiency. This phenotypic overlap may result in underdiagnosis of NLPR12-AID among patients with PID.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00296-018-4002-8

  7 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29465491
[Au] Autor:Tang Y; Tan H; Hu S
[Ad] Address:From the PET Center, XiangYa Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China.
[Ti] Title:Is There Any Potential of FDG PET/CT in Monitoring Disease Activity in Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis?
[So] Source:Clin Nucl Med;43(4):296-298, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-0229
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:FDG PET/CT was performed in a 30-year-old woman to detect the source of fever of unknown origin. The images showed widespread abnormal activity, consistent with lymphoma. However, lymph node biopsy revealed only inflammation, and a diagnosis of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis was eventually made after familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-specific gene was detected. After proper therapy, a follow-up FDG PET/CT examination 2 months later showed resolution of most of the previously seen lesions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/RLU.0000000000002008

  8 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29487087
[Au] Autor:Antoon JW; Peritz DC; Parsons MR; Skinner AC; Lohr JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, Chicago, Illinois; jantoon@uic.edu.
[Ti] Title:Etiology and Resource Use of Fever of Unknown Origin in Hospitalized Children.
[So] Source:Hosp Pediatr;8(3):135-140, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2154-1663
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a well-known pediatric presentation. The primary studies determining the causes of prolonged fever in children were performed 4 decades ago, before major advances in laboratory and diagnostic testing. Given that the distribution of diagnosed causes of adult FUO has changed in recent decades, we hypothesized that the etiology of FUO in children has concordantly changed and also may be impacted by a definition that includes a shorter required duration of fever. METHODS: A single-center, retrospective review of patients 6 months to 18 years of age admitted to the North Carolina Children's Hospital from January 1, 2002, to December 21, 2012, with an diagnosis of fever, a documented fever duration >7 days before admission, and a previous physician evaluation of each patient's illness. RESULTS: A total of 1164 patients were identified, and of these, 102 met our inclusion criteria for FUO. Etiologic categories included "infectious" (42 out of 102 patients), "autoimmune" (28 out of 102 patients), "oncologic" (18 out of 102 patients), and "other" or "unknown" (14 out of 102 patients). Several clinical factors were statistically and significantly different between etiologic categories, including fever length, laboratory values, imaging performed, length of stay, and hospital costs. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike adult studies, the categorical distribution of diagnoses for pediatric FUO has marginally shifted compared to previously reported pediatric studies. Patients hospitalized with FUO undergo prolonged hospital stays and have high hospital costs. Additional study is needed to improve the recognition, treatment, and expense of diagnosis of prolonged fever in children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1542/hpeds.2017-0098

  9 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29390335
[Au] Autor:Burzo ML; Antonelli M; Pecorini G; Favuzzi AMR; Landolfi R; Flex A
[Ad] Address:Institute of Internal Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Fever of unknown origin and splenomegaly: A case report of blood culture negative endocarditis.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9197, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Fever of unknown origin (FUO) can be determined by different conditions among which infectious diseases represent the main cause. PATIENT CONCERNS: A young woman, with a history of aortic stenosis, was admitted to our unit for a month of intermittent fever associated with a new diastolic heart murmur and splenomegaly. Laboratory tests were negative for infectious screening. The total body computed tomography (CT) scan excluded abscesses, occulted neoplasia, or lymphadenopathy. DIAGNOSES: The transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram showed an aortic valve vegetation. Three sets of blood cultures were negative for all microorganisms tested. According to these findings, Bartonella endocarditis was suspected and the serology tests performed were positive. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected Bartonella henselae DNA on tissue valve. INTERVENTIONS: The patient underwent heart valve surgery and a treatment of Ampicillin, Gentamicin, and oral Doxycycline was prescribed for 16 days and, successively, with Doxycycline and Ceftriaxone for 6 weeks. OUTCOMES: After surgery and antibiotic therapy, patient continued to do well. LESSONS: Bartonella species are frequently the cause of negative blood culture endocarditis. Molecular biology techniques are the only useful tool for diagnosis. Valvular replacement is often necessary and antibiotic regimen with Gentamicin and either Ceftriaxone or Doxycycline is suggested as treatment.Echocardiogram and blood cultures must be performed in all cases of FUO. When blood cultures are negative and echocardiographic tools are indicative, early use of Bartonella serology is recommended.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cat-Scratch Disease/diagnosis
Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Cat-Scratch Disease/drug therapy
Cat-Scratch Disease/surgery
Combined Modality Therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Echocardiography
Endocarditis, Bacterial/drug therapy
Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery
Female
Fever of Unknown Origin
Humans
Middle Aged
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Splenomegaly
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009197

  10 / 6145 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29471868
[Au] Autor:Dalugama C
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. chamaradalugama@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Asymptomatic thyroiditis presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):51, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pyrexia of unknown origin is a difficult and challenging problem for the physician. Endocrine disorders, such as subacute thyroiditis, rarely present with pyrexia of unknown origin. Subacute thyroiditis can have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations including fever and biochemical thyrotoxicosis without overt signs or symptoms. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 42-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese man was extensively investigated for a prolonged fever of 3 weeks with high inflammatory markers. He had mild tenderness over his neck with cervical lymphadenopathy with no thyrotoxic symptoms or signs. An ultrasound scan revealed an enlarged thyroid with increased vascularity and he had suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone with elevated free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine hormone levels. Fine-needle aspiration cytology confirmed thyroiditis. He responded well to low-dose steroids. CONCLUSION: Subacute thyroiditis should be considered in the diagnostic workup of pyrexia of unknown origin even in the absence of overt toxic symptoms of thyroid hormone excess.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1590-6


page 1 of 615 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information