Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Food and Hypersensitivity [Words]
References found : 19354 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29512839
[Au] Autor:Reddy K; Kearns M; Alvarez-Arango S; Carrillo-Martin I; Cuervo-Pardo N; Cuervo-Pardo L; Dimov V; Lang DM; Lopez-Alvarez S; Schroer B; Mohan K; Dula M; Zheng S; Kozinetz C; Gonzalez-Estrada A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics East, Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA.
[Ti] Title:YouTube and Food Allergy: An Appraisal of the Educational Quality of Information.
[So] Source:Pediatr Allergy Immunol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3038
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Food allergy affects an estimated 8% of children and 3% of adults in the US. Food-allergic individuals increasingly use the web for medical information. We sought to determine the educational quality of food allergy YouTube videos. METHODS: We performed a YouTube search using keywords "food allergy" and "food allergies". The 300 most viewed videos were included and analyzed for characteristics, source, and content. Source was further classified as health care provider, alternative medicine provider, patient, company, media, and professional society. A scoring system (FA-DQS) was created to evaluate quality (-10 to +34 points). Negative points were assigned for misleading information. Eight blinded reviewers scored each video independently. RESULTS: Three hundred videos were analyzed, with a median of 6,351.50 views, 19 likes, one dislike. More video presenters were female (54.3%). The most common type of video source was alternative medicine provider (26.3%). Alternative treatments included: water fast, juicing, ayurveda, apple cider, yoga, visualization, and sea moss. Controversial diagnostics included kinesiology, IgG testing, pulse test. Almost half of the videos depicted a non-IgE mediated reaction (49.0%).Videos by professional societies had the highest FA-DQS (7.27). Scores for videos by professional societies were significantly different from other sources (p < 0.001). There was a high degree of agreement among reviewers (ICC = 0.820; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: YouTube videos on food allergy frequently recommend controversial diagnostics and commonly depict non-IgE mediated reactions. There is a need for high quality, evidence-based, educational videos on food allergy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pai.12885

  2 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489655
[Au] Autor:Liu X; Hong X; Tsai HJ; Mestan KK; Shi M; Kefi A; Hao K; Chen Q; Wang G; Caruso D; Geng H; Gao Y; He J; Kumar R; Wang H; Yu Y; Bartell T; Tan XD; Schleimer RP; Weeks DE; Pongracic JA; Wang X
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Genomic and Precision Medicine, China Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Center, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Genome-wide association study of maternal genetic effects and parent-of-origin effects on food allergy.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(9):e0043, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previous genetic studies of food allergy (FA) have mainly focused on inherited genotypic effects. The role of parental genotypic effects remains largely unexplored. Leveraging existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data generated from the Chicago Food Allergy Study, we examined maternal genotypic and parent-of-origin (PO) effects using multinomial likelihood ratio tests in 588 complete and incomplete Caucasian FA trios. We identified 1 single nucleotide polymorphism with significant (P < 5×10) maternal effect on any FA (rs4235235), which is located in a noncoding RNA (LOC101927947) with unknown function. We also identified 3 suggestive (P < 5×10) loci with maternal genetic effects: 1 for any FA (rs976078, in a gene desert region on 13q31.1) and 2 for egg allergy (rs1343795 and rs4572450, in the ZNF652 gene, where genetic variants have been associated with atopic dermatitis). Three suggestive loci with PO effect were observed: 1 for peanut allergy (rs4896888 in the ADGB gene) and 2 for any FA in boys only (rs1036504 and rs2917750 in the IQCE gene). Findings from this family-based GWAS of FA provided some preliminary evidence on maternal genotypic or PO effects on FA. Additional family-based studies are needed to confirm our findings and gain new insight into maternal and paternal genetic contribution to FA.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Food Hypersensitivity/genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genomic Imprinting
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Fathers
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mothers
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000010043

  3 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29274211
[Au] Autor:Jakubas-Zawalska J; Asman M; Solarz K
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, School of Pharmacy with the Division of Laboratory Medicine in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, ul. Jednosci 8, 41-218 Sosnowiec, Poland
[Ti] Title:Sensitization to the storage mites Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari, Sarcoptiformes, Astigmatina) in a suburban population in Southern Poland
[So] Source:Ann Parasitol;63(3):183-188, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2299-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mite infestation of stored products is a serious threat to food safety and public health. These stored product mites are not only serious pests of stored food but also cause allergies in humans. Thirty serum samples from patients living in suburban areas of Upper Silesia (South Poland) were tested for sensitization to two species of storage mites: Lepidoglyphus destructor [LD] and Tyrophagus putrescentiae [TP]. Patient antibodies against particular antigens were identified using anti-human anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies. Fifteen protein fractions from LD gave positive reactions with IgE antibodies and 18 from TP. Seven of the 30 samples showed positive reactions to a protein fraction measuring about 29 kDa from LD and six reacted with a fraction measuring about 25 kDa from TP. These findings may imply the existence of many protein fractions with allergenic properties besides the characterized allergens in the two tested species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypersensitivity/epidemiology
Hypersensitivity/immunology
Mites/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Allergens/immunology
Allergens/metabolism
Animals
Female
Humans
Male
Mites/metabolism
Poland/epidemiology
Suburban Population
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Allergens)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17420/ap6303.104

  4 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247574
[Au] Autor:Burton OT; Medina Tamayo J; Stranks AJ; Miller S; Koleoglou KJ; Weinberg EO; Oettgen HC
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:IgE promotes type 2 innate lymphoid cells in murine food allergy.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Allergy;48(3):288-296, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2222
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mast cells serve an important sentinel function at mucosal barriers and have been implicated as key early inducers of type 2 immune responses in food allergy. The generation of Th2 and IgE following food allergen ingestion is inhibited in the absence of mast cells. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells are also thought to play an important early role in nascent allergic responses. OBJECTIVE: To test whether IgE-mediated mast cell activation promotes intestinal ILC2 responses following ingestion of food allergens and whether ILC2 amplify food allergy. METHODS: Two different mouse models of food allergy, one using intraperitoneally ovalbumin (OVA)-primed BALB/c animals and the other using enterally peanut-sensitized inherently atopic IL4raF709 mice, were applied to test the contributions of IgE antibodies and mast cells to ILC2 responses. The effect of ILC2 on mast cell activation and on anaphylaxis was tested. RESULTS: ILC2 responses were significantly impaired in both models of food allergy in Igh7 mice harbouring a targeted deletion of the gene encoding IgE. A similar reduction in food allergen-induced ILC2 was observed in mast cell-deficient Il4raF709 Kit mice, and this was partially corrected by reconstituting these animals using cultured bone marrow mast cells. Mast cells activated ILC2 for IL-13 production in an IL-4Rα-dependent manner. Activated ILC2 amplified systemic anaphylaxis by increasing target tissue sensitivity to mast cell mediators. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These findings support an important role for IgE-activated mast cells in driving intestinal ILC2 expansion in food allergy and reveal that ILC2, in turn, can enhance responsiveness to the mediators of anaphylaxis produced by mast cells. Strategies designed to inhibit IgE signalling or mast cell activation are likely to inhibit both type 2 immunity and immediate hypersensitivity in food allergy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/cea.13075

  5 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390311
[Au] Autor:Suwarsa O; Rahardjo RM; Sutedja E; Dharmadji HP; Hindritiani R; Gunawan H
[Ad] Address:Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran-Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.
[Ti] Title:Systemic contact dermatitis due to corrosion of titanium-coated nickel and cobalt bone plate fixation: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9120, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Corrosion refers to the degradation of a material that occurs following its interaction with other substances in the environment. Corrosion of metallic substances into tissues may lead to inflammatory responses such as systemic contact dermatitis (SCD), a skin condition where an individual who has previously been sensitized to a particular allergen via the cutaneous route will subsequently react to same allergen via the systemic route. This condition occurs following exposure to allergens such as metals, medications, and certain food substances. In recent years, the use of metal plates for internal fixation has become increasingly common in bone fracture repairs. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 34-year-old Indonesian male presented with systemic erythema with itching 7 days following a bone plate fixation as a management for mandibular fracture. DIAGNOSES: Physical examination showed pruritic red macules, papules, and scales on almost his entire body, along with facial swelling. The patch test results revealed a positive reaction to nickel and cobalt. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with SCD. INTERVENTIONS: The patient was treated with topical and systemic corticosteroids as well as bone plate removal. OUTCOME: After treatment, the eruption turned brown, the itching was resolved, and there were no facial swelling as well. LESSONS: This case report highlights the need to consider the occurrence of SCD in patients following bone plate fixation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bone Plates
Dermatitis, Contact/etiology
Dermatitis, Contact/therapy
Fracture Fixation, Internal/instrumentation
Mandibular Fractures/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use
Adult
Cobalt
Corrosion
Device Removal
Humans
Male
Nickel
Patch Tests
Titanium
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adrenal Cortex Hormones); 3G0H8C9362 (Cobalt); 7OV03QG267 (Nickel); D1JT611TNE (Titanium)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009120

  6 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29315922
[Au] Autor:Dantzer JA; Wood RA
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
[Ti] Title:The use of omalizumab in allergen immunotherapy.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Allergy;48(3):232-240, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2222
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although omalizumab (anti-IgE) is currently only approved for the treatment of asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria, it has also been studied as an off-label treatment for numerous allergic conditions, including use as an adjunct to allergen immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, asthma, venom hypersensitivity and food allergy. We conducted a review of publications involving the use of omalizumab with allergen immunotherapy, by searching PubMed with key search terms of "omalizumab" and "immunotherapy." Omalizumab has been used in combination with inhalant allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis and comorbid asthma. While there have been no randomized controlled trials evaluating the addition of omalizumab to venom IT, several case reports and small patient series have been published on the use of omalizumab with venom IT. Omalizumab has been used in conjunction with oral immunotherapy for the treatment of milk, peanut and egg, as well as other foods in multi-allergen protocols. In conclusion, omalizumab used in conjunction with immunotherapy has shown promising results, especially in the reduction of adverse reactions. At this stage, larger, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to better identify those patients who would benefit the most from the addition of omalizumab to immunotherapy, as well as optimal dosing strategies and duration of treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/cea.13084

  7 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29370173
[Au] Autor:Benedé S; Berin MC
[Ad] Address:Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Mast cell heterogeneity underlies different manifestations of food allergy in mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190453, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Food can trigger a diverse array of symptoms in food allergic individuals from isolated local symptoms affecting skin or gut to multi-system severe reactions (systemic anaphylaxis). Although we know that gastrointestinal and systemic manifestations of food allergy are mediated by tissue mast cells (MCs), it is not clear why allergen exposure by the oral route can result in such distinct clinical manifestations. Our aim was to assess the contribution of mast cell subsets to different manifestations of food allergy. We used two common models of IgE-mediated food allergy, one resulting in systemic anaphylaxis and the other resulting in acute gastrointestinal symptoms, to study the immune basis of allergic reactions. We used responders and non-responders in each model system, as well as naïve controls to identify the association of mast cell activation with clinical reactivity rather than sensitization. Systemic anaphylaxis was uniquely associated with activation of connective tissue mast cells (identified by release of mouse mast cell protease (MMCP) -7 into the serum) and release of histamine, while activation of mucosal mast cells (identified by release of MMCP-1 in the serum) did not correlate with symptoms. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergy were associated with an increase of MMCP-1-expressing mast cells in the intestine, and evidence of both mucosal and connective tissue mast cell activation. The data presented in this paper demonstrates that mast cell heterogeneity is an important contributor to manifestations of food allergy, and identifies the connective tissue mast cell subset as key in the development of severe systemic anaphylaxis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Food Hypersensitivity/immunology
Mast Cells/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology
Histamine Release
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Mast Cells/enzymology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mice, Inbred C3H
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tryptases/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 3.4.21.59 (Tpsab1 protein, mouse); EC 3.4.21.59 (Tryptases)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190453

  8 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29429507
[Au] Autor:Léauté-Labrèze C
[Ad] Address:Unité de dermatologie pédiatrique et centre de référence des maladies rares de la peau, hôpital Pellegrin-Enfants, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex, France. Electronic address: christine.labreze@chu-bordeaux.fr.
[Ti] Title:Quoi de neuf en dermatologie pédiatrique ? [What's new in pediatric dermatology?]
[So] Source:Ann Dermatol Venereol;143 Suppl 3:S29-S36, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0151-9638
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:The association of a birth defect and a segmental hemangioma is well established, a consensus concerning evaluation and monitoring of infants with PHACE or LUMBAR syndromes has been published. The efficacy of propranolol in infantile hemangioma is proven; however there were still unresolved issues concerning the safety in children; after 8 years of use on thousands of children safety data collection did not show any unexpected side effects. Topical treatment of infantile hemangiomas with beta-blockers, such as timolol, is very popular, but recent publications revealed a significant systemic absorption that could be responsible for severe side effects, such as bradycardia, in low birthweight infants. As a consequence, this therapeutic option should be considered with caution. In the last 2 years mTOR inhibitors have been tested in low-flow vascular malformations with varying success, but progress remains to be done in the treatment of vascular abnormalities. Today, genetics has led to advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and in the future targeted therapies could probably be feasible. Skin barrier deficiency is responsible for the development of allergic phenomena in atopic patients, since it has been shown that sensibilisation, even to food, could probably be induced by skin contact. Unfortunately, the topical treatment with crisaborole, a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, does not look like a revolution in children atopic dermatitis, its efficacy seems equivalent to emollient application. In the field of infectious diseases, changes in viral outbreaks are the most reported. Furthermore epidemic Zika virus, enteroviruses are responsible for expanded dermatological manifestations and also severe meningoencephalitis. Paraviral character of various eruptions, such as gloves and socks syndrome or eruptive pseudoangiomatosis is challenged.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Skin Diseases
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aortic Coarctation/therapy
Autoimmune Diseases/genetics
Child
Dermatology
Eye Abnormalities/therapy
Food Hypersensitivity/immunology
Hemangioma/therapy
Humans
Neurocutaneous Syndromes/therapy
Pediatrics
STAT3 Transcription Factor/genetics
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/etiology
Skin Diseases/therapy
Skin Physiological Phenomena
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (STAT3 Transcription Factor); 0 (STAT3 protein, human)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29338961
[Au] Autor:Armentia A; Martín-Armentia S; Martín-Armentia B; Santos-Fernández J; Álvarez R; Madrigal B; Fernández-González D; Gayoso S; Gayoso MJ
[Ad] Address:Allergy Service, Hospital Universitario Río Hortega, Valladolid University, Spain. Electronic address: aliciaarmentia@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Is eosinophilic esophagitis an equivalent of pollen allergic asthma? Analysis of biopsies and therapy guided by component resolved diagnosis.
[So] Source:Allergol Immunopathol (Madr);46(2):181-189, 2018 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1578-1267
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic inflammation. There is not a clear etiologic treatment. Biopsies analysis using plant histology methods may show callose and pollen tubes in the esophageal mucosa. Component-resolved diagnosis (CRD) with microarrays could detect possible allergens involved and indicate an elimination diet and allergen immunotherapy (AIT). METHODS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with EoE were tested for environmental and food allergens. CRD, histological and botanical analysis were performed. Clinical scores and endoscopic biopsy were performed every six months for three years. Fifty healthy patients, 50 asthmatics due to pollen, and 53 celiac disease patients were included as comparison groups. CRD-directed AIT was administered in 91 EoE patients and elimination diet in 140 patients (87 EoE and all 53 CD patients). RESULTS: CRD detected allergen hypersensitivity in 87.6% of patients with EoE. The predominant allergens were grass group 1 (55%), lipid transfer proteins (LTP) of peach and mugwort, hazelnuts and walnuts. Callose from pollen tubes was found in 65.6% of biopsies. After CRD-guided elimination diet and/or AIT, 101 (78.3%) EoE patients showed significant clinical improvement (p<0.017) and 97 (75.2%) were discharged (negative biopsy, no symptoms, no medication) without relapse. AIT-treated patients had better outcomes (odds ratio 177.3, 95% CI 16.2-1939.0). CONCLUSION: CRD-directed AIT and/or elimination diet was efficient in treating EoE patients and was well tolerated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 19354 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29437805
[Au] Autor:Ribeiro A; Moreira D; Costa C; Pinto Pais I
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Hospital Center of Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: a challenging diagnosis.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity triggered by food proteins. It may present acutely, with repetitive vomiting, diarrhoea and lethargy leading to dehydration and eventually shock or insidiously with intermittent emesis, chronic diarrhoea or failure to thrive. We describe a paediatric male patient with recurrent sepsis-like episodes of fever, lethargy, ashen-grey skin colouration and vomiting followed by diarrhoea. These episodes were triggered by cow's milk formula and grains. Laboratory tests revealed leucocytosis, thrombocytosis, metabolic acidosis and elevated C reactive protein. After exclusion of other differential diagnoses, the diagnosis of FPIES was established on clinical improvement with withdrawal of the offending food and positive oral food challenge. FPIES diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and is frequently delayed, which contributes to an increased morbidity. This is due to the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and due to the absence of specific diagnostic tests.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Process


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