Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29323107
[Au] Autor:Zhu R; Cheng T; Yin Z; Liu D; Xu L; Li Y; Wang W; Liu J; Que Y; Ye X; Tang Q; Zhao Q; Ge S; He S; Xia N
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics, School of Life Sciences, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361102, China.
[Ti] Title:Serological survey of neutralizing antibodies to eight major enteroviruses among healthy population.
[So] Source:Emerg Microbes Infect;7(1):2, 2018 Jan 10.
[Is] ISSN:2222-1751
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human enteroviruses (EVs) are the most common causative agents infecting human, causing many harmful diseases, such as hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), herpangina (HA), myocarditis, encephalitis, and aseptic meningitis. EV-related diseases pose a serious worldwide threat to public health. To gain comprehensive insight into the seroepidemiology of major prevalent EVs in humans, we firstly performed a serological survey for neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71), Coxsackie virus A16 (CV-A16), Coxsackie virus A6 (CV-A6), Coxsackie virus A10 (CV-A10), Coxsackie virus B3 (CV-B3), Coxsackie virus B5 (CV-B5), Echovirus 25 (ECHO25), and Echovirus 30 (ECHO30) among the healthy population in Xiamen City in 2016, using micro-neutralization assay. A total of 515 subjects aged 5 months to 83 years were recruited by stratified random sampling. Most major human EVs are widely circulated in Xiamen City and usually infect infants and children. The overall seroprevalence of these eight EVs were ranged from 14.4% to 42.7%, and most of them increased with age and subsequently reached a plateau. The co-existence of nAbs against various EVs are common among people ≥ 7 years of age, due to the alternate infections or co-infections with different serotypes of EVs, while most children were negative for nAb against EVs, especially those < 1 year of age. This is the first report detailing the seroepidemiology of eight prevalent EVs in the same population, which provides scientific data supporting further studies on the improvement of EV-related disease prevention and control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41426-017-0003-z

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[PMID]: 29516864
[Au] Autor:Waddle AW; Sai M; Levy JE; Rezaei G; van Breukelen F; Jaeger JR
[Ad] Address:School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.
[Ti] Title:Systematic approach to isolating Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;127(3):243-247, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We developed a protocol for isolating the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) from anurans. We sampled skin tissues from 2 common treefrogs, Pseudacris regilla and P. triseriata, collected from populations with high infection prevalence. We sampled tissues from 3 anatomical ventral regions (thigh, abdomen, and foot) where the pathogen is thought to concentrate. To mitigate potential bacterial contamination, we used a unique combination of 4 antibiotics. We quantified infections on frogs as zoospore equivalents (ZE) using a swabbing approach combined with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We isolated Bd from 68.9% of frogs sampled from both species. Contamination was low (9.7% of all plates), with most contamination presumed to be fungal. We found positive correlations between successful isolation attempts and infection intensity. Our levels of isolation success were 74% for P. triseriata and 100% for P. regilla once Bd detection intensities reached ≥40 ZE. Of the 3 anatomical regions sampled in both species, we had significantly more success isolating Bd from foot tissue. Our results support published recommendations to focus sampling for Bd infection on feet, particularly webbing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao03203

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[PMID]: 29447400
[Au] Autor:Ongsri P; Bunyaratavej S; Leeyaphan C; Pattanaprichakul P; Ongmahutmongkol P; Komoltri C; Kulthanan K
[Ad] Address:Naval Medical Department, Queen Sirikit Hospital, Royal Thai Navy, 163, Sukhumvit Road, Phlutaluang, Sattahip, Chonburi Province 20180, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and Clinical Correlation of Superficial Fungal Foot Infection in Thai Naval Rating Cadets.
[So] Source:Mil Med;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Superficial fungal foot infection is one of the most important dermatological diseases currently affecting military personnel. Many Thai naval rating cadets are found to suffer from superficial fungal foot infections and their sequels. Objective: To investigate prevalence, potent risk factors, responding pathogens and clinical correlation of superficial fungal foot infection in Thai naval rating cadets training in Naval rating school, Sattahip, Thailand. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in August 2015. Validated structured questionnaire was used regarding information about behaviors and clinical symptoms. Quality of life was assessed by Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) questionnaire and clinical presentation demonstrated by Athlete's foot severity score (AFSS). Laboratory investigations including direct microscopic examination and fungal culture were performed and recorded. All of the participants were informed and asked for their consent. Results: A total of 788 Thai naval rating cadets with a mean age of 19 yr were enrolled. There were 406 (51.5%) participants suspected of fungal skin infection from questionnaire screening. After clinical examination, 303 participants (38.5%) were found to have foot lesions (AFSS ≥1). Superficial fungal foot infection was diagnosed with microscopic examination and fungal culture in 57 participants, giving a point prevalence of 7.2%. Tinea pedis was diagnosed in 54 participants with the leading causative organism being Trichophyton mentagrophytes (52.8%). Other 3 participants were diagnosed as cutaneous candidiasis. Wearing combat shoes more than 8 h was found to be a predisposing factor (p = 0.029), taking a shower less than two times a day (p = 0.008), and wearing sandals during shower (p = 0.055) was found to be protective against infection. Most fungal feet infection cases noticed their feet abnormalities (p < 0.001) including scales (p < 0.001), vesicles (p = 0.003) and maceration at interdigital web spaces (p < 0.001). Mean DLQI in superficial fungal foot infection cases was 3.35. Participants who had foot lesions (AFSS ≥1) were concerned of their foots unpleasant odor demonstrated significantly higher mean DLQI than those without odor (4.2 vs. 2.28; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Superficial fungal foot infection is found as 7.2% of naval rating cadets. Wearing combat shoes more than 8 h was found to be a predisposing factor. In addition to skin manifestations including scales, vesicles, and maceration, superficial fungal foot infection also exhibited an unpleasant foot odor which affected quality of life. Self-foot-examination and life style modification should be promoted to prevent fungal infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx187

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[PMID]: 29497040
[Au] Autor:Lv Z; Hu M; Fan M; Li X; Lin J; Zhen J; Wang Z; Jin H; Wang R
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China.
[Ti] Title:Podocyte-specific Rac1 deficiency ameliorates podocyte damage and proteinuria in STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice.
[So] Source:Cell Death Dis;9(3):342, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2041-4889
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Activation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) has been implicated in diverse kidney diseases, yet its in vivo significance in diabetic nephropathy (DN) is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated a podocyte-specific Rac1-deficient mouse strain and showed that specific inhibition of Rac1 was able to attenuate diabetic podocyte injury and proteinuria by the blockade of Rac1/PAK1/p38/ß-catenin signaling cascade, which reinstated the integrity of podocyte slit diaphragms (SD), rectified the effacement of foot processes (FPs), and prevented the dedifferentiation of podocytes. In vitro, we showed Rac1/PAK1 physically bound to ß-catenin and had a direct phosphorylation modification on its C-terminal Ser675, leading to less ubiquitylated ß-catenin, namely more stabilized ß-catenin, and its nuclear migration under high-glucose conditions; further, p38 activation might be responsible for ß-catenin nuclear accumulation via potentiating myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2c) phosphorylation. These findings provided evidence for a potential renoprotective and therapeutic strategy of cell-specific Rac1 deficiency for DN and other proteinuric diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41419-018-0353-z

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[PMID]: 29508559
[Au] Autor:Souley Kouato B; Thys E; Renault V; Abatih E; Marichatou H; Issa S; Saegerman C
[Ad] Address:Research Unit in Epidemiology and Risk Analysis Applied to Veterinary Sciences (UREAR-ULg), Fundamental and Applied Research for Animals & Health (FARAH) Centre, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Spatio-temporal patterns of foot-and-mouth disease transmission in cattle between 2007 and 2015 and quantitative assessment of the economic impact of the disease in Niger.
[So] Source:Transbound Emerg Dis;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1865-1682
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Niger, with outbreaks occurring every year. Recently, there was an increasing interest from veterinary authorities to implement preventive and control measures against FMD. However, for an efficient control, improving the current knowledge on the disease dynamics and factors related to FMD occurrence is a prerequisite. The objective of this study was therefore to obtain insights into the incidence and the spatio-temporal patterns of transmission of FMD outbreaks in Niger based on the retrospective analysis of 9-year outbreak data. A regression tree analysis model was used to identify statistically significant predictors associated with FMD incidence, including the period (year and month), the location (region), the animal-contact density and the animal-contact frequency. This study provided also a first report on economic losses associated with FMD. From 2007 to 2015, 791 clinical FMD outbreaks were reported from the eight regions of Niger, with the number of outbreaks per region ranging from 5 to 309. The statistical analysis revealed that three regions (Dosso, Tillabery and Zinder), the months (September, corresponding to the end of rainy season, to December and January, i.e., during the dry and cold season), the years (2007 and 2015) and the density of contact were the main predictors of FMD occurrence. The quantitative assessment of the economic impacts showed that the average total cost of FMD at outbreak level was 499 euros, while the average price for FMD vaccination of one outbreak was estimated to be more than 314 euros. Despite some limitations of the clinical data used, this study will guide further research into the epidemiology of FMD in Niger and will promote a better understanding of the disease as well as an efficient control and prevention of FMD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tbed.12845

  6 / 31727 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505922
[Au] Autor:Shi GJ; Shi GR; Zhou JY; Zhang WJ; Gao CY; Jiang YP; Zi ZG; Zhao HH; Yang Y; Yu JQ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004, China.
[Ti] Title:Involvement of growth factors in diabetes mellitus and its complications: A general review.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:510-527, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major endocrine metabolic disease and is marked by a lack of insulin. The complication of DM is one of the most difficult problems in medicine. The initial translational studies revealed that growth factors have a major role in integrating tissue physiology and in embryology as well as in growth, maturation and tissue repair. In some tissues affected by diabetes, growth factors are induced by a relative deficit or excess. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a promising regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism with multiple beneficial effects including hypoglycemic and lipid-lowering. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic and vascular permeability factor and is implicated in both of these complications in diabetes. Increase or decrease in the production of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1) has been associated with diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a naturally-occurring single chain polypeptide which has been widely used in the treatment of diabetic glomerular and renal tubular injuries. This review summarizes the recent evidences for an involvement of growth factors in diabetic complications, focusing on their emergence in sequence of events leading to vascular complications or their potential therapeutic role in these diseases. Growth factor therapy in diabetic foot ulcers is already a clinical reality. As methods to finely regulate growth factors in a tissue and time-specific manner are further developed and tested, regulation of the growth factor to normal level in vivo may well become a therapy to prevent and treat diabetic complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 31727 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489650
[Au] Autor:Sun Y; Wang H; Tang Y; Qin S; Zhao M; Zhang F
[Ad] Address:Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability with ligamentum bifurcatum injury: An observational study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(9):e0028, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aimed to report our institution's experience in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI) with ligamentum bifurcatum (LB) injury.This retrospective study included 218 consecutive patients with CLAI who underwent surgery from January 2012 to December 2015. The 218 patients received tendon allograft reconstruction of the lateral ligament. CLAI was combined with LB injury in 51.4% (112/218) of patients. The 112 patients with concurrent LB injury had this treated simultaneously; 36 patients underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus, 68 underwent LB repair, and 8 underwent LB reconstruction. Patients returned for a clinical and radiologic follow-up evaluation at an average of 31 (range, 24-35) months postoperatively. Outcomes were assessed by comparison of pre- and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores, visual analog scale pain scores, Karlsson scores, and radiographic assessment.Of the patients with concurrent LB injury, 82.1% (92/112) returned for final evaluation. Postoperatively, most patients recovered very well. However, the outcome was not ideal in those who underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus; there were significant postoperative decreases in talar tilt (P < .05) and anterior drawer (P < .05), but there was no significant postoperative improvement in visual analog scale pain score and AOFAS score. Patients who underwent LB repair or reconstruction had an excellent or good outcome regarding patient subjective self-assessment, pain scores, Karlsson scores, and AOFAS scores at final follow-up.Patients with CLAI often have concurrent LB injury. The diagnosis of LB injury can be missed or delayed. Clinicians should closely examine the LB in cases of CLAI, and should surgically repair or reconstruct the LB when necessary.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ankle Injuries/diagnosis
Ankle Injuries/surgery
Joint Instability/diagnosis
Joint Instability/surgery
Ligaments, Articular/injuries
Ligaments, Articular/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Ankle Injuries/epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Incidence
Joint Instability/epidemiology
Male
Patient Satisfaction
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000010028

  8 / 31727 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29192001
[Au] Autor:Qian G; Zhou CC
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Affiliated Children's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:A child with nail changes.
[So] Source:BMJ;359:j5192, 2017 11 30.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease/complications
Nail Diseases/etiology
Nails, Malformed/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Enterovirus/isolation & purification
Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease/virology
Humans
Incidental Findings
Male
Nail Diseases/pathology
Nails, Malformed/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.j5192

  9 / 31727 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29387895
[Au] Autor:Schellong SM
[Ad] Address:Medizinische Klinik 2, Städtisches Klinikum Dresden, Friedrichstr. 41, 01067, Dresden, Deutschland. schellong-se@khdf.de.
[Ti] Title:Das auffällige Bein. [The conspicuous leg].
[So] Source:Internist (Berl);59(3):227-233, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1289
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Symptoms of the leg or of both legs, may indicate a need for evaluation and/or treatment, which must be clarified urgently or even as an emergency situation. Among the diseases which must be considered from a vascular viewpoint are critical limb ischemia, suspicion of deep leg vein thrombosis and special forms of venous insufficiency. With respect to infections erysipelas and the syndrome of infected diabetic foot must be considered as well as peripheral and central leg paresis as orthopedic and neurological disorders, respectively. The current review summarizes the main clinical features of these diseases. Criteria are discussed as to which require the particular capabilities of a hospital and which patients can be managed in an outpatient setting.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00108-018-0386-5

  10 / 31727 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29472266
[Au] Autor:Foryoung JB; Ditah C; Nde Fon P; Mboue-Djieka Y; Nebongo DN; Mbango ND; Balla V; Choukem SP
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine and Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
[Ti] Title:Long-term mortality in outpatients with type 2 diabetes in a reference hospital in Cameroon: a retrospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMJ Open;8(2):e019086, 2018 02 22.
[Is] ISSN:2044-6055
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: There are limited data on mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed at determining the mortality rate, and the causes and the predictors of death in patients with T2DM followed as outpatients in a reference hospital in Cameroon. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: A reference hospital in Cameroon. PARTICIPANTS: From December 2015 to March 2016, patients with T2DM aged 18 years and older and who consulted between January 2009 and December 2014, were contacted directly or through their next of kin, and included in this study. All participants with less than 75% of desired data in files, those who could not be reached on the phone and those who refused to provide consent were excluded from the study. Of the 940 eligible patients, 628 (352 men and 276 women) were included and completed the study, giving a response rate of 66.8%. OUTCOME MEASURES: Death rate, causes of death and predictors of death. RESULTS: Of the 628 patients (mean age: 56.5 years; median diabetes duration: 3.5 years) followed up for a total of 2161 person-years, 54 died, giving a mortality rate of 2.5 per 100 person-years and a cumulative mortality rate of 8.6%. Acute metabolic complications (22.2%), cardiovascular diseases (16.7%), cancers (14.8%), nephropathy (14.8%) and diabetic foot syndrome (13.0%) were the most common causes of death. Advanced age (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.10; P=0.002), raised glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (aHR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.35; P=0.051), low blood haemoglobin (aHR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.10; P=0.002) and proteinuria (aHR 2.97, 95% CI 1.40 to 6.28; P=0.004) were identified as independent predictors of death. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality rate in patients with T2DM is high in our population, with acute metabolic complications as the leading cause. Patients with advanced age, raised HbA1c, anaemia or proteinuria are at higher risk of death and therefore represent the target of interest to prevent mortality in T2DM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019086


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