Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29506499
[Au] Autor:Braun U; Warislohner S; Torgerson P; Nuss K; Gerspach C
[Ad] Address:Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse-Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057, Zurich, Switzerland. ubraun@vetclinics.uzh.ch.
[Ti] Title:Clinical and laboratory findings in 503 cattle with traumatic reticuloperitonitis.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):66, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The study evaluated the results of clinical examination and haematological and serum biochemical analyses in 503 cattle with traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP). RESULTS: The most common clinical findings were abnormal demeanour and general condition (87%), decreased rumen motility (72%), poorly digested faeces (57%), decreased rumen fill (49%), fever (43%) and tachycardia (26%). In 58% of the cattle, at least one of three tests for reticular foreign bodies (pinching of the withers, pressure on the xiphoid and percussion of the abdominal wall) was positive, and in 42% all three tests were negative. The most common haematological findings were decreased haematocrit in 45% of cattle and leukocytosis in 42%. An increase in the concentration of fibrinogen in 69% of cattle and total protein in 64% were the main biochemical findings. The glutaraldehyde test time was decreased with coagulation occurring within 6 min in 75% of cattle. CONCLUSIONS: In many cases, a diagnosis of TRP is not possible based on individual clinical or laboratory findings because even the most common abnormalities are not seen in all cattle with TRP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1394-3

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[PMID]: 29287885
[Au] Autor:Sheehan CC; Lopez J; Elmaraghy CA
[Ad] Address:The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, United States.
[Ti] Title:Low rate of positive bronchoscopy for suspected foreign body aspiration in infants.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;104:72-75, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To describe our institution's low rate of positive bronchoscopy in infants suspected of inhaling a foreign body. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients at a tertiary children's hospital with suspected inhalation of a foreign body. Charts were reviewed for demographic information, radiologic findings, operative reports, and respiratory viral panels were reviewed. RESULTS: Sixteen pediatric patients under 12 months of age were identified from 2008 to 2016 with a diagnosis of possible airway foreign body inhalation who underwent emergent bronchoscopy. Of these patients, only one was positive for a foreign body present in the airway. The remaining 15 children were found to have a negative direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy evaluation for a foreign body. Of these fifteen patients, 14 were found to have structural airway abnormalities and 7 tested positive for a respiratory viral infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our institution has a low rate of positive bronchoscopy for highly suspected foreign body inhalation in a group of patients less than 12 months of age. Patients presenting with respiratory distress, stridor, or other airway symptoms were often found to have an underlying airway abnormality or viral infection, which coupled with an unclear history, would increase the suspicion for an airway foreign body and subsequent decision to perform bronchoscopy. In stable patients, diagnostic evaluation for an underlying respiratory infection should be performed in these cases. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Case Series.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bronchoscopy/statistics & numerical data
Foreign Bodies/diagnosis
Respiratory System/injuries
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Foreign Bodies/epidemiology
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Laryngoscopy/statistics & numerical data
Male
Retrospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171231
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28452700
[Au] Autor:Ghadersohi S; Ference EH; Detwiller K; Kern RC
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
[Ti] Title:Presentation, workup, and management of penetrating transorbital and transnasal injuries: A case report and systematic review.
[So] Source:Am J Rhinol Allergy;31(2):29-34, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-8932
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A foreign body (FB) penetrating intracranially after passing transorbitally or transnasally is a rare occurrence. However, otolaryngologists are increasingly being asked to participate in the care of these patients for both endoscopic removal of the object and repair of any skull base defects. OBJECTIVE: To assess the presentation, workup, and management of transnasal or transorbital penetrating FB injury. METHODS: Systematic review of the presentation, workup, and management of transnasal or transorbital penetrating FB injury; plus, a case report of a 53-year-old woman with a transorbital penetrating rose bush branch. We searched medical literature data bases, which resulted in 215 total titles, which were then narrowed based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. RESULTS: Thirty-five cases of transorbital or transnasal low-velocity trauma that involved the paranasal sinuses were reviewed from 33 articles. The average age was 30 years, 40% of the objects were made of wood. Fifty-seven percent of the cases were transorbital, whereas 43% were transnasal. Forty-six percent of the surgical interventions were completed endoscopically or with endoscopic assistance. Complications of injury were common, with 66% of patients experiencing cerebrospinal fluid leaks; 23%, permanent blindness; 17%, meningitis; 14%, ophthalmoplegia; 9%, decreased visual acuity; and 3%, brain abscess. Our patient presented with a traumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, and recovered well after transorbital and endoscopic removal of the branch, skull base repair, and a prolonged course of antibiotics and antifungal medications. CONCLUSIONS: Transnasal and transorbital penetrating FB injuries are a relatively uncommon occurrence but when they do occur require rapid workup and interdisciplinary management to prevent acute and delayed complications.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma/epidemiology
Endoscopy
Eye Injuries/epidemiology
Head Injuries, Penetrating/epidemiology
Orbit/surgery
Paranasal Sinuses/surgery
Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/etiology
Craniocerebral Trauma/surgery
Eye Injuries/surgery
Female
Foreign Bodies
Head Injuries, Penetrating/surgery
Humans
Middle Aged
Skull Base/surgery
United States/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2500/ajra.2017.31.4421

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[PMID]: 29519203
[Au] Autor:Francisco ARG; Duarte J; de Oliveira EI
[Ad] Address:1 Cardiology Department, Santa Maria University Hospital, CHLN, CAML, CCUL, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Port-A-Cath Catheter Embolization to Distal Pulmonary Artery Branches: Two Tailored Percutaneous Retrieval Approaches.
[So] Source:Vasc Endovascular Surg;:1538574418762191, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-9116
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Several types of intravascular devices and catheters are frequently used for long-term drug therapy, especially for oncological patients. As a result, complications are becoming increasingly common, namely catheter embolization. Retrieving these devices is important, as embolized fragments may lead to serious consequences, such as arrhythmias, myocardial injury, thrombosis, infection, and even perforation and death. We describe 2 cases of long-term drug catheter (Port-A-Cath) fracture, incidentally documented in a routine chest radiograph. In both cases, percutaneous extraction was attempted, yet the procedure was complicated by embolization of smaller fragments into the arterial pulmonary vasculature. We describe unusual approaches in successfully retrieving the remaining fragments. The ideal approaches for removal of foreign bodies from the cardiovascular system differ from case to case, but percutaneous extraction should be preferred in most of the cases. Less common techniques may be helpful in challenging cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1538574418762191

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[PMID]: 29451156
[Au] Autor:Baltazares-Lipp ME; Sarabia-Ortega B; Soto-González JI; Aboitiz-Rivera CM; Carmona-Ruiz HA; Blachman-Braun R
[Ad] Address:Department of Hemodynamics and Echocardiography, National Institute of Respiratory Diseases "Ismael Cosío Villegas", 14080 Mexico City, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Intravascular Foreign Bodies: A Single-Institution Experience and Description of a Novel Modified Percutaneous Retrieval Technique.
[So] Source:Chin Med J (Engl);131(4):484-485, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:0366-6999
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/0366-6999.225060

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[PMID]: 29509542
[Au] Autor:Toma EA; Oun M; Enciu O; Calu V; Miron A
[Ti] Title:The Surgical Management of Acute Esophageal Perforation by Accidentally Ingested Fish Bone.
[So] Source:Chirurgia (Bucur);113(1):156-161, 2018 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1221-9118
[Cp] Country of publication:Romania
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Esophageal foreign bodies are a relatively frequent pathology which does not need any kind of treatment in up to 80% of cases. Ten to 20% of patients are treated endoscopically, while less than 1% need surgery either due to perforation or to treat complications. We address the case of a 50 year old male who presented with an impacted esophageal foreign body which had perforated the esophageal wall. Flexible endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis and identified a large fish bone that was stuck transversally in the distal cervical esophagus and could not be mobilized. Surgery was mandatory in this case, with the extraction of the bone and double-layer suture, which did not prevent the appearence of an esophageal leakage more than two weeks postoperatively, which was treated conservatively. Even if it is rarely employed in the treatment of gastrointestinal foreign bodies, surgical treatment is unavoidable in cases of irretrievable esophageal foreign bodies or esophageal perforation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29504350
[Au] Autor:Rasheed MA; Kashif A; Naz A; Ali S
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital Gujranwala, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Accidental Ingestion Of Toothbrush: An Unusual Foreign Body.
[So] Source:J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad;30(1):130-132, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1819-2718
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Toothbrush is a rare foreign body to be ingested accidentally. The unusual shape of the toothbrush with no theoretical possibility of spontaneous passage mandates an interventional approach. If left untreated, it can lead to pressure necrosis, bleeding, perforation and ulceration. An endoscopic attempt in an expert clinic if available is the ideal approach. If failed, surgical management by laparoscope or mini laparotomy should be done. The evaluation for underlying psychiatric disorders like bulimia, schizophrenia or generalized eating disorder should be considered to prevent such recurrence. Here, we present a case of 55 years of age, male living a normal life with no known comorbid, who ingested accidentally a toothbrush two weeks prior to presentation and was managed at our surgical department after a failed endoscopic attempt.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29393996
[Au] Autor:Leung V; Dunn H; Beshay N; Smith J; O'Donnell B
[Ad] Address:Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Surfboard-related intraorbital foreign bodies: a case series and radiological considerations.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Ophthalmol;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1442-9071
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ceo.13161

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[PMID]: 29500812
[Au] Autor:Mamas N; Andreanos K; Brouzas D; Diagourtas A; Droulias A; Georgalas I; Papaconstantinou D
[Ad] Address:First Department of Ophthalmology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Mesogeion Ave 154, 15667, Athens, Greece. nikolaos.mamas@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Acute ocular pain during magnetic resonance imaging due to retained intraocular metallic foreign body: the role of ultrasonography and ultrasound biomicroscopy in diagnosis and management of this condition.
[So] Source:J Ultrasound;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1876-7931
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To report the case of a 65-year-old metalworker with no known history of ocular trauma, who suffered from intense ocular pain during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, due to a retained intraocular metallic foreign body (IOFB). CASE REPORT: Meticulous ophthalmological examination was inconclusive. An IOFB was confirmed with X-ray scan, whereas its exact localization was enabled by means of ultrasonography and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). CONCLUSIONS: Despite appropriate screening protocols, MRI-related ocular complications might occur in the presence of a hidden metallic IOFB. Clinical detection of ocular foreign bodies can sometimes be challenging. Ultrasonography and UBM are valuable adjuncts for the accurate localization, especially of small or hidden particles.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40477-018-0289-2

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[PMID]: 29376218
[Au] Autor:Thompson ER; Hosgood SA; Nicholson ML; Wilson CH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Transplantation, The Freeman Hospital, Freeman Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK, NE7 7DN.
[Ti] Title:Early versus late ureteric stent removal after kidney transplantation.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD011455, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage kidney disease. In a previous review we concluded that the routine use of ureteric stents in kidney transplantation reduces the incidence of major urological complications (MUC). Unfortunately, this reduction appears to lead to a concomitant rise in urinary tract infections (UTI). For kidney recipients UTI is now the commonest post-transplant complication. This represents a considerable risk to the immunosuppressed transplant recipient, particularly in the era of increased immunologically challenging transplants. There are a number of different approaches taken when considering ureteric stenting and these are associated with differing degrees of morbidity and hospital cost. OBJECTIVES: This review aimed to look at the benefits and harms of early versus late removal of the ureteric stent in kidney transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register up to 27 March 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE; handsearching conference proceedings; and searching the International Clinical Trials Register Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. SELECTION CRITERIA: All RCTs and quasi-RCTs were included in our meta-analysis. We included recipients of kidney transplants regardless of demography (adults or children) or the type of stent used. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors reviewed the identified studies to ascertain if they met inclusion criteria. We designated removal of a ureteric stent before the third postoperative week (< day 15) or during the index transplant admission as "early" removal. The studies were assessed for quality using the risk of bias tool. The primary outcome of interest was the incidence of MUC. Further outcomes of interest were the incidence of UTI, idiosyncratic stent-related complications, hospital-related costs and adverse events. A subgroup analysis was performed examining the difference in complications reported depending on the type of ureteric stent used; bladder indwelling (BI) versus per-urethral (PU). Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and results expressed as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). MAIN RESULTS: Five studies (1127 patients) were included in our analysis. Generally the risk of bias of the included studies was judged low or unclear; they addressed the research question and utilised a prospective randomised design. It is uncertain whether early stent removal verus late stent removal improved the incidence of MUC (5 studies, 1127 participants: RR 1.87, 95% CI 0.61 to 5.71; I = 21%; low certainty evidence). The incidence of UTI may be reduced in the early stent removal group (5 studies, 1127 participants: RR 0.49 95% CI 0.30 to 0.81; I = 59%; moderate certainty evidence). This possible reduction in the UTI incidence was only apparent if a BI stent was used, (3 studies, 539 participants, RR 0.45 95% CI 0.29 to 0.70; I = 13%; moderate certainty evidence). However, if an externalised PU stent was used there was no discernible difference in UTI incidence between the early and late group (2 studies, 588 participants: RR 0.60 95% CI 0.17, 2.03; I = 83%; low certainty evidence). Data on health economics and quality of life outcomes were lacking. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Early removal of ureteric stents following kidney transplantation may reduce the incidence of UTI while it uncertain if there is a higher risk of MUC. BI stents are the optimum method for achieving this benefit.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Device Removal/adverse effects
Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects
Postoperative Complications/etiology
Stents/adverse effects
Ureter
Urinary Tract Infections/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Child
Foreign Bodies/etiology
Humans
Incidence
Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Time Factors
Urinary Bladder
Urinary Tract Infections/epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD011455.pub2


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