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[PMID]: 29385169
[Au] Autor:Bissa M; Forlani G; Zanotto C; Tosi G; De Giuli Morghen C; Accolla RS; Radaelli A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, via Balzaretti 9, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Fowlpoxvirus recombinants coding for the CIITA gene increase the expression of endogenous MHC-II and Fowlpox Gag/Pro and Env SIV transgenes.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190869, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A complete eradication of an HIV infection has never been achieved by vaccination and the search for new immunogens that can induce long-lasting protective responses is ongoing. Avipoxvirus recombinants are host-restricted for replication to avian species and they do not have the undesired side effects induced by vaccinia recombinants. In particular, Fowlpox (FP) recombinants can express transgenes over long periods and can induce protective immunity in mammals, mainly due to CD4-dependent CD8+ T cells. In this context, the class II transactivator (CIITA) has a pivotal role in triggering the adaptive immune response through induction of the expression of class-II major histocompatibility complex molecule (MHC-II), that can present antigens to CD4+ T helper cells. Here, we report on construction of novel FPgp and FPenv recombinants that express the highly immunogenic SIV Gag-pro and Env structural antigens. Several FP-based recombinants, with single or dual genes, were also developed that express CIITA, driven from H6 or SP promoters. These recombinants were used to infect CEF and Vero cells in vitro and determine transgene expression, which was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Subcellular localisation of the different proteins was evaluated by confocal microscopy, whereas HLA-DR or MHC-II expression was measured by flow cytometry. Fowlpox recombinants were also used to infect syngeneic T/SA tumour cells, then injected into Balb/c mice to elicit MHC-II immune response and define the presentation of the SIV transgene products in the presence or absence of FPCIITA. Antibodies to Env were measured by ELISA. Our data show that the H6 promoter was more efficient than SP to drive CIITA expression and that CIITA can enhance the levels of the gag/pro and env gene products only when infection is performed by FP single recombinants. Also, CIITA expression is higher when carried by FP single recombinants than when combined with FPgp or FPenv constructs and can induce HLA-DR cell surface expression. However, in-vivo experiments did not show any significant increase in the humoral response. As CIITA already proved to elicit immunogenicity by improving antigen presentation, further in-vivo experiments should be performed to increase the immune responses. The use of prime/boost immunisation protocols and the oral administration route of the recombinants may enhance the immunogenicity of Env peptides presented by MHC-II and provide CD4+ T-cell stimulation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genes, Viral
Major Histocompatibility Complex/genetics
Nuclear Proteins/genetics
Poxviridae/genetics
Recombination, Genetic
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/genetics
Trans-Activators/genetics
Transgenes
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: AIDS Vaccines/genetics
AIDS Vaccines/immunology
Animals
Blotting, Western
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
Cell Line
Chick Embryo
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
HIV Infections/immunology
HIV Infections/prevention & control
Humans
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Microscopy, Confocal
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (AIDS Vaccines); 0 (MHC class II transactivator protein); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Trans-Activators)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190869

  2 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29088720
[Au] Autor:Morillon YM; Hammond SA; Durham NM; Schlom J; Greiner JW
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
[Ti] Title:Enhanced immunotherapy by combining a vaccine with a novel murine GITR ligand fusion protein.
[So] Source:Oncotarget;8(43):73469-73482, 2017 Sep 26.
[Is] ISSN:1949-2553
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Immunotherapy was significantly enhanced in a murine tumor model by combining a vaccine with a fusion protein designed to target the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor related gene (GITR) on the surface of T cells. The recombinant poxvirus-based vaccine platform included Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA) and fowlpox (rF) vectors as the driver immunogens both engineered to express the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and three murine costimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, LFA-3 (designated TRICOM). In previous studies, mice expressing human as a transgene (CEA.Tg mice) vaccinated with rMVA/rF-CEA-TRICOM overcame CEA immune tolerance by inducing anti-CEA‒specific immunity and regression of CEA-expressing tumors. The murine GITR ligand fusion protein (mGITRL-FP) consisted of a mouse IgG2a Fc region, a yeast-derived coiled GCN4 pII and the extracellular GITR-binding domain of murine GITR ligand. The design maximized valency and the potential to agonize the GITR receptor. Combined treatment of the vaccine and mGITRL-FP mediated a more robust tumor regression, leading to sustained improvement in overall survival. The enhanced immunotherapeutic effect was linked to the generation of a strong CD8 T cell antitumor immune response. A treatment schedule with mGITRL-FP administered prior to the priming rMVA-CEA-TRICOM vaccination was of paramount importance. The mechanism of action for the enhanced antitumor effects resided in the depletion of immune cells, particularly FoxP3 regulatory T cells, that express high GITR levels following activation. The results provide evidence that targeting GITR with mGITRL-FP in concert with a cancer vaccine represents a potential novel approach to more effective immunotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.20703

  3 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28904195
[Au] Autor:Sauermann U; Radaelli A; Stolte-Leeb N; Raue K; Bissa M; Zanotto C; Krawczak M; Tenbusch M; Überla K; Keele BF; De Giuli Morghen C; Sopper S; Stahl-Hennig C
[Ad] Address:Unit of Infection Models, Deutsches Primatenzentrum GmbH, Goettingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Vector order determines protection against pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection in a triple component vaccine by balancing CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses.
[So] Source:J Virol;, 2017 Sep 13.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An effective AIDS vaccine should elicit strong humoral and cellular immune responses while maintaining low levels of CD4 T cell activation to avoid the generation of target cells for viral infection. The present study investigated two prime-boost regimens, both starting vaccination with single cycle immunodeficiency virus, followed by two mucosal boosts either with recombinant adenovirus (rAd) or fowlpox virus (rFWPV) expressing SIVmac239 or SIVmac251 and genes, respectively. Finally, vectors were switched and systemically administered to the reciprocal group of animals. Only mucosal rFWPV immunizations followed by systemic rAd boost significantly protected animals against a repeated low-dose, intrarectal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251 resulting in a vaccine efficacy (i.e. risk reduction per exposure) of 68%. Delayed viral acquisition was associated with higher levels of activated CD8 T cells and Gag-specific IFN-γ secreting CD8 cells, low virus-specific CD4 T cell responses and low Env antibody titers. In contrast, the systemic rFWPV boost induced strong virus-specific CD4 T cell activity. rAd and rFWPV also induced differential patterns of the innate immune responses, thereby possibly shaping the specific immunity. Plasma levels after final immunization correlated directly with virus-specific CD4 T cell responses and inversely with the number of exposures to infection. Also, the percentage of activated CD69 CD8 T cells correlated with the number of exposures to infection. Differential stimulation of the immune response likely provided the basis for the diverging levels of protection afforded by this vaccine regimen. A failed phase II AIDS vaccine trial led to the hypothesis that CD4 T cell activation can abrogate any potentially protective effects delivered by vaccination or promote acquisition of the virus because CD4 T helper cells, required for an effective immune response, also represent the target cells for viral infection. We compared two vaccination protocols that elicited similar levels of Gag-specific immune responses in rhesus macaques. Only the animal group that had a low level of virus-specific CD4 T cells in combination with high levels of activated CD8 T cells was significantly protected from infection. Notably, protection was achieved despite the lack of appreciable Env-antibody titers. Moreover, we show that both, the vector and the route of immunization affected the level of CD4 T cell responses. Thus, mucosal immunization with FWPV-based vaccines should be considered as potent prime in prime-boost vaccination protocols.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28820373
[Au] Autor:Mapaco LP; Lacerda Z; Monjane IVA; Gelaye E; Sussuro AH; Viljoen GJ; Dundon WG; Achá SJ
[Ti] Title:Identification of Clade E Avipoxvirus, Mozambique, 2016.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;23(9):1602-1604, 2017 09.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Analysis of scab samples collected from poultry during outbreaks of fowlpox in Mozambique in 2016 revealed the presence of clade E avipoxviruses. Infected poultry were from flocks that had been vaccinated against fowlpox virus. These findings require urgent reevaluation of the vaccine formula and control strategies in this country.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171111
[Lr] Last revision date:171111
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2309.161981

  5 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28611493
[Au] Autor:Zhu Y; Guo Y; Du S; Liu C; Wang M; Ren D; Zhao F; Zhang Y; Sun W; Li Y; Cao T; Jiang Y; Xing B; Bai B; Li C; Jin N
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Changchun, 130122 China.
[Ti] Title:Construction, Selection and Immunogenicity of Recombinant Fowlpox Candidate Vaccine Co-expressing HIV-1 gag and gp145.
[So] Source:Indian J Microbiol;57(2):162-170, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0046-8991
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An HIV candidate vaccine for the Chinese population was designed by constructing a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 gag and HIV gp145 proteins via homologous recombination and plaque screening using ( ) as the reporter gene. in the recombinant was then knocked out with the Cre/Loxp system yielding rFPV , which was identified at the genomic, transcriptional and translational levels. The immunogenicity of rFPV was analyzed by measuring levels of HIV-specific antibodies and IFN-γ-secreting splenocytes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IFN enzyme-linked immune spot test in the BALB/c mouse model. Results showed that rFPV could not stimulate HIV-1 specific antibodies or IFN-γ-secreting cells by a single immunization. Meanwhile, in the prime-boost strategy, HIV-p24 antibodies ( < 0.01) and IFN-γ-secreting cells ( < 0.05) were induced strongly by the candidate vaccine after the boost immunization. Thus, both humoral and cellular immunity could be elicited by the candidate vaccine in a prime-boost immunization strategy. This study provides a foundation for future preclinical studies on the HIV rFPV candidate vaccine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12088-017-0639-3

  6 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28508215
[Au] Autor:Bickerton E; Keep SM; Britton P
[Ad] Address:The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Pirbright, Surrey, GU24 0NF, UK. erica.bickerton@pirbright.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Reverse Genetics System for the Avian Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus.
[So] Source:Methods Mol Biol;1602:83-102, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1940-6029
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We have developed a reverse genetics system for the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in which a full-length cDNA corresponding to the IBV genome is inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a T7 promoter sequence. Vaccinia virus as a vector for the full-length IBV cDNA has the advantage that modifications can be introduced into the IBV cDNA using homologous recombination, a method frequently used to insert and delete sequences from the vaccinia virus genome. Here, we describe the use of transient dominant selection as a method for introducing modifications into the IBV cDNA that has been successfully used for the substitution of specific nucleotides, deletion of genomic regions, and exchange of complete genes. Infectious recombinant IBVs are generated in situ following the transfection of vaccinia virus DNA, containing the modified IBV cDNA, into cells infected with a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing T7 DNA-dependant RNA polymerase.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170516
[Lr] Last revision date:170516
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-1-4939-6964-7_6

  7 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28411240
[Au] Autor:Anasir MI; Caria S; Skinner MA; Kvansakul M
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria 3086, Australia and.
[Ti] Title:Structural basis of apoptosis inhibition by the fowlpox virus protein FPV039.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;292(22):9010-9021, 2017 Jun 02.
[Is] ISSN:1083-351X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Programmed cell death or apoptosis of infected host cells is an important defense mechanism in response to viral infections. This process is regulated by proapoptotic and prosurvival members of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein family. To counter premature death of a virus-infected cell, poxviruses use a range of different molecular strategies including the mimicry of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. One such viral prosurvival protein is the fowlpox virus protein FPV039, which is a potent apoptosis inhibitor, but the precise molecular mechanism by which FPV039 inhibits apoptosis is unknown. To understand how fowlpox virus inhibits apoptosis, we examined FPV039 using isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray crystallography. Here, we report that the fowlpox virus prosurvival protein FPV039 promiscuously binds to cellular proapoptotic Bcl-2 and engages all major proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Unlike other identified viral Bcl-2 proteins to date, FPV039 engaged with cellular proapoptotic Bcl-2 with affinities comparable with those of Bcl-2's endogenous cellular counterparts. Structural studies revealed that FPV039 adopts the conserved Bcl-2 fold observed in cellular prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins and closely mimics the structure of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family protein Mcl-1. Our findings suggest that FPV039 is a pan-Bcl-2 protein inhibitor that can engage all host BH3-only proteins, as well as Bcl-2-associated X, apoptosis regulator (Bax) and Bcl-2 antagonist/killer (Bak) proteins to inhibit premature apoptosis of an infected host cell. This work therefore provides a mechanistic platform to better understand FPV039-mediated apoptosis inhibition.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/chemistry
Fowlpox virus/chemistry
Viral Proteins/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism
Avian Proteins/chemistry
Avian Proteins/genetics
Avian Proteins/metabolism
Chickens
Crystallography, X-Ray
Fowlpox virus/genetics
Fowlpox virus/metabolism
Humans
Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein/chemistry
Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein/genetics
Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein/metabolism
Protein Domains
Viral Proteins/genetics
Viral Proteins/metabolism
bcl-2-Associated X Protein/chemistry
bcl-2-Associated X Protein/genetics
bcl-2-Associated X Protein/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins); 0 (Avian Proteins); 0 (BAX protein, human); 0 (MCL1 protein, human); 0 (Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein); 0 (Viral Proteins); 0 (bcl-2-Associated X Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170609
[Lr] Last revision date:170609
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170416
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1074/jbc.M116.768879

  8 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28283004
[Au] Autor:Alam P; Parvez MK; Arbab AH; Al-Dosari MS
[Ad] Address:a Department of Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy , King Saud University , Riyadh , Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative analysis of rutin, quercetin, naringenin, and gallic acid by validated RP- and NP-HPTLC methods for quality control of anti-HBV active extract of Guiera senegalensis.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;55(1):1317-1323, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Guiera senegalensis J.F. Gmel (Combretaceae) is a folk medicinal plant used in various metabolic and infectious diseases. In addition to its antiviral activities against herpes and fowlpox, the anti-HBV efficacy is very recently reported. OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate simple, sensitive RP-/NP-HPTLC methods for quantitative determination of biomarkers rutin, quercetin, naringenin, and gallic acid in the anti-HBV active G. senegalensis leaves ethanol-extract. MATERIALS AND METHODS: RP-HPTLC (rutin & quercetin; phase- acetonitrile:water, 4:6) and NP-HPTLC (naringenin & gallic acid; phase- toluene:ethyl acetate:formic acid, 6:4:0.8) were performed on glass-backed silica gel plates 60F -RP18 and 60F , respectively. The methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. RESULTS: Well-separated and compact spots (R ) of rutin (0.52 ± 0.006), quercetin (0.23 ± 0.005), naringenin (0.56 ± 0.009) and gallic acid (0.28 ± 0.006) were detected. The regression equations (Y) were 12.434x + 443.49, 10.08x + 216.85, 11.253x + 973.52 and 11.082x + 446.41 whereas the coefficient correlations (r ) were 0.997 ± 0.0004, 0.9982 ± 0.0001, 0.9974 ± 0.0004 and 0.9981 ± 0.0001, respectively. The linearity ranges (ng/spot) were 200-1400 (RP-HPTLC) and 100-1200 (NP-HPTLC). The LOD/LOQ (ng/band) were 33.03/100.1 (rutin), 9.67/29.31 (quercetin), 35.574/107.8 (naringenin), and 12.32/37.35 (gallic acid). Gallic acid (7.01 µg/mg) was the most abundant biomarker compared to rutin (2.42 µg/mg), quercetin (1.53 µg/mg) and naringenin (0.14 µg/mg) in the extract. CONCLUSION: The validated NP-/RP-HPTLC methods were simple, accurate, and sensitive for separating and quantifying antiviral biomarkers in G. senegalensis, and endorsed its anti-HBV activity. The developed methods could be further employed in the standardization and quality-control of herbal formulations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiviral Agents/analysis
Combretaceae
Flavanones/analysis
Gallic Acid/analysis
Quercetin/analysis
Rutin/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, Thin Layer/methods
Hepatitis B virus
Plant Extracts/analysis
Plant Leaves
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Flavanones); 0 (Plant Extracts); 5G06TVY3R7 (Rutin); 632XD903SP (Gallic Acid); 9IKM0I5T1E (Quercetin); HN5425SBF2 (naringenin)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170321
[Lr] Last revision date:170321
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170312
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13880209.2017.1300175

  9 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28056224
[Au] Autor:Townsend DG; Trivedi S; Jackson RJ; Ranasinghe C
[Ad] Address:Molecular Mucosal Vaccine Immunology Group, Department of Immunology and Infectious Disease, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Recombinant fowlpox virus vector-based vaccines: expression kinetics, dissemination and safety profile following intranasal delivery.
[So] Source:J Gen Virol;98(3):496-505, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1465-2099
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We have previously established that mucosal uptake of recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines is far superior to other vector-based vaccines. Specifically, intranasal priming with rFPV vaccines can recruit unique antigen-presenting cells, which induce excellent mucosal and systemic HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity. In this study, we have for the first time investigated the in vivo dissemination, safety and expression kinetics of rFPV post intranasal delivery using recombinant viruses expressing green fluorescent protein or mCherry. Both confocal microscopy of tissue sections using green fluorescent protein and in vivo Imaging System (IVIS) spectrum live animal and whole organ imaging studies using mCherry revealed that (i) the peak antigen expression occurs 12 to 24 h post vaccination and no active viral gene expression is detected 96 h post vaccination. (ii) The virus only infects the initial vaccination site (lung and nasal cavity) and does not disseminate to distal sites such as the spleen or gut. (iii) More importantly, rFPV does not cross the olfactory receptor neuron pathway. Collectively, our findings indicate that rFPV vector-based vaccines have all the hallmarks of a safe and effective mucosal delivery vector, suitable for clinical evaluation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: AIDS Vaccines/administration & dosage
AIDS Vaccines/adverse effects
Fowlpox virus
HIV Antigens/administration & dosage
HIV Antigens/adverse effects
Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: AIDS Vaccines/metabolism
Administration, Intranasal
Animals
Gastrointestinal Tract/metabolism
Genetic Vectors/administration & dosage
Genetic Vectors/adverse effects
Green Fluorescent Proteins/analysis
Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics
Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism
HIV Antigens/metabolism
Luminescent Proteins/analysis
Luminescent Proteins/genetics
Luminescent Proteins/metabolism
Lung/metabolism
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Molecular Imaging
Nasal Mucosa/metabolism
Spleen/metabolism
Vaccination
Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
Vaccines, Synthetic/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (AIDS Vaccines); 0 (HIV Antigens); 0 (Luminescent Proteins); 0 (Vaccines, Synthetic); 0 (red fluorescent protein); 147336-22-9 (Green Fluorescent Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170509
[Lr] Last revision date:170509
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jgv.0.000702

  10 / 818 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28054222
[Au] Autor:Lecis R; Secci F; Antuofermo E; Nuvoli S; Scagliarini A; Pittau M; Alberti A
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sassari, Via Vienna 2, 07100, Sassari, Italy. rlecis@uniss.it.
[Ti] Title:Multiple gene typing and phylogeny of avipoxvirus associated with cutaneous lesions in a stone curlew.
[So] Source:Vet Res Commun;41(2):77-83, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7446
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Avipoxvirus (APV) infections have been observed in a wide variety of wild, captive and domestic avian hosts, recently including a range of island endemic and endangered species. However, not enough is known about genome diversity and phylogenetic relationships of APVs, as well as their host-range specificity. A wild stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) was recovered in Sardinia (Italy), showing large wart-like lesions and nodules on both legs and toes, which resulted positive to poxvirus by PCR. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed ballooning degeneration and large intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies consistent with APV infection. A multiple gene sequencing approach was applied to highlight the phylogenetic relationships of this virus with a panel of selected APVs at the clade and subclade levels. This novel isolate was characterized by sequencing partial 4b core protein, P35 (locus fpv140) and DNA polymerase genes and phylogenetic analyses assigned it to clade A, (Fowlpox virus, FWPV), subclade A2. Conservation implications of avian pox presence in Sardinian stone curlews and possibly in other island bird species are discussed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Avipoxvirus/genetics
Bird Diseases/virology
Charadriiformes/virology
Poxviridae Infections/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bird Diseases/pathology
Genotyping Techniques/veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary
Poxviridae Infections/virology
Sequence Analysis, DNA/veterinary
Skin/pathology
Skin/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11259-016-9674-5


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