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[PMID]: 29484497
[Au] Autor:Cipollini D; Peterson DL
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA. Don.cipollini@wright.edu.
[Ti] Title:The potential for host switching via ecological fitting in the emerald ash borer-host plant system.
[So] Source:Oecologia;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The traits used by phytophagous insects to find and utilize their ancestral hosts can lead to host range expansions, generally to closely related hosts that share visual and chemical features with ancestral hosts. Host range expansions often result from ecological fitting, which is the process whereby organisms colonize and persist in novel environments, use novel resources, or form novel associations with other species because of the suites of traits that they carry at the time they encounter the novel environment. Our objective in this review is to discuss the potential and constraints on host switching via ecological fitting in emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, an ecologically and economically important invasive wood boring beetle. Once thought of as an ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree specialist, recent studies have revealed a broader potential host range than was expected for this insect. We discuss the demonstrated host-use capabilities of this beetle, as well as the potential for and barriers to the adoption of additional hosts by this beetle. We place our observations in the context of biochemical mechanisms that mediate the interaction of these beetles with their host plants and discuss whether evolutionary host shifts are a possible outcome of the interaction of this insect with novel hosts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-018-4089-3

  2 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29474690
[Au] Autor:Bick EN; Forbes NJ; Haugen C; Jones G; Bernick S; Miller F
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, CA.
[Ti] Title:Seven-Year Evaluation of Insecticide Tools for Emerald Ash Borer in Fraxinus pennsylvanica (Lamiales: Oleaceae) Trees.
[So] Source:J Econ Entomol;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1938-291X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is decimating ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Combatting EAB includes the use of insecticides; however, reported insecticide efficacy varies among published studies. This study assessed the effects of season of application, insecticide active ingredient, and insecticide application rate on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) (Lamiales: Oleaceae) canopy decline caused by EAB over a 5- to 7-yr interval. Data suggested that spring treatments were generally more effective in reducing canopy decline than fall treatments, but this difference was not statistically significant. Lowest rates of decline (<5% over 5 yr) were observed in trees treated with imidacloprid injected annually in the soil during spring (at the higher of two tested application rates; 1.12 g/cm diameter at 1.3 m height) and emamectin benzoate injected biennially into the stem. All tested insecticides (dinotefuran, emamectin benzoate, and imidacloprid) under all tested conditions significantly reduced the rate of increase of dieback.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jee/toy018

  3 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29257137
[Au] Autor:Sambles CM; Salmon DL; Florance H; Howard TP; Smirnoff N; Nielsen LR; McKinney LV; Kjær ED; Buggs RJA; Studholme DJ; Grant M
[Ad] Address:Biosciences, Geoffrey Pope Building, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ash leaf metabolomes reveal differences between trees tolerant and susceptible to ash dieback disease.
[So] Source:Sci Data;4:170190, 2017 12 19.
[Is] ISSN:2052-4463
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:European common ash, Fraxinus excelsior, is currently threatened by Ash dieback (ADB) caused by the fungus, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. To detect and identify metabolites that may be products of pathways important in contributing to resistance against H. fraxineus, we performed untargeted metabolomic profiling on leaves from five high-susceptibility and five low-susceptibility F. excelsior individuals identified during Danish field trials. We describe in this study, two datasets. The first is untargeted LC-MS metabolomics raw data from ash leaves with high-susceptibility and low-susceptibility to ADB in positive and negative mode. These data allow the application of peak picking, alignment, gap-filling and retention-time correlation analyses to be performed in alternative ways. The second, a processed dataset containing abundances of aligned features across all samples enables further mining of the data. Here we illustrate the utility of this dataset which has previously been used to identify putative iridoid glycosides, well known anti-herbivory terpenoid derivatives, and show differential abundance in tolerant and susceptible ash samples.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fraxinus
Metabolome
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Plant Diseases
Plant Leaves/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:DATASET; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/sdata.2017.190

  4 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458714
[Au] Autor:Kosawang C; Amby DB; Bussaban B; McKinney LV; Xu J; Kjær ED; Collinge DB; Nielsen LR
[Ad] Address:Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: chko@ign.ku.dk.
[Ti] Title:Fungal communities associated with species of Fraxinus tolerant to ash dieback, and their potential for biological control.
[So] Source:Fungal Biol;122(2-3):110-120, 2018 Feb - Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-6146
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ash dieback, caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has threatened ash trees in Europe for more than two decades. However, little is known of how endophytic communities affect the pathogen, and no effective disease management tools are available. While European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is severely affected by the disease, other more distantly related ash species do not seem to be affected. We hypothesise that fungal endophytic communities of tolerant ash species can protect the species against ash dieback, and that selected endophytes have potential as biocontrol agents. These hypotheses were tested by isolating members of the fungal communities of five tolerant ash species, and identifying them using ITS regions. Candidate endophytes were tested by an in vitro antagonistic assay with H.fraxineus. From a total of 196 isolates we identified 9 fungal orders, 15 families, and 40 species. Fungi in orders Pleosporales, such as Boeremia exigua and Diaporthe spp., and Hypocreales (e.g., Fusarium sp.), were recovered in most communities, suggesting they are common taxa. The in vitro antagonistic assay revealed five species with high antagonistic activity against H. fraxineus. These endophytes were identified based on ITS region as Sclerostagonospora sp., Setomelanomma holmii, Epicoccum nigrum, B. exigua and Fusarium sp. Three of these taxa have been described previously as antagonists of plant pathogenic microbes, and are of interest for future studies of their potential as biological control agents against ash dieback, especially for valuable ash trees in parks and urban areas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351291
[Au] Autor:He H; Zhang C; Zhao X; Fousseni F; Wang J; Dai H; Yang S; Zuo Q
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory for Forest Resources & Ecosystem Processes, Beijing Forestry University, Haidian District, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Allometric biomass equations for 12 tree species in coniferous and broadleaved mixed forests, Northeastern China.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0186226, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Understanding forest carbon budget and dynamics for sustainable resource management and ecosystem functions requires quantification of above- and below-ground biomass at individual tree species and stand levels. In this study, a total of 122 trees (9-12 per species) were destructively sampled to determine above- and below-ground biomass of 12 tree species (Acer mandshuricum, Acer mono, Betula platyphylla, Carpinus cordata, Fraxinus mandshurica, Juglans mandshurica, Maackia amurensis, P. koraiensis, Populus ussuriensis, Quercus mongolica, Tilia amurensis and Ulmus japonica) in coniferous and broadleaved mixed forests of Northeastern China, an area of the largest natural forest in the country. Biomass allocation was examined and biomass models were developed using diameter as independent variable for individual tree species and all species combined. The results showed that the largest biomass allocation of all species combined was on stems (57.1%), followed by coarse root (21.3%), branch (18.7%), and foliage (2.9%). The log-transformed model was statistically significant for all biomass components, although predicting power was higher for species-specific models than for all species combined, general biomass models, and higher for stems, roots, above-ground biomass, and total tree biomass than for branch and foliage biomass. These findings supplement the previous studies on this forest type by additional sample trees, species and locations, and support biomass research on forest carbon budget and dynamics by management activities such as thinning and harvesting in the northeastern part of China.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomass
Forests
Trees/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: China
Models, Theoretical
Plant Structures
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0186226

  6 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346533
[Au] Autor:Burr SJ; McCullough DG; Poland TM
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, Natural Science Building, East Lansing, MI.
[Ti] Title:Density of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Adults and Larvae at Three Stages of the Invasion Wave.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;47(1):121-132, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding buprestid, has killed hundreds of millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the United States and two Canadian provinces. We evaluated EAB persistence in post-invasion sites and compared EAB adult captures and larval densities in 24 forested sites across an east-west gradient in southern Michigan representing the Core (post-invasion), Crest (high EAB populations), and Cusp (recently infested areas) of the EAB invasion wave. Condition of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) trees were recorded in fixed radius plots and linear transects in each site. Ash mortality was highest in Core sites in the southeast, moderate in Crest sites in central southern Michigan, and low in Cusp sites in the southwest. Traps and trap trees in Crest sites accounted for 75 and 60% of all EAB beetles captured in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Populations of EAB were present in all Core sites and traps in these sites captured 13% of all beetles each year. Beetle captures and larval densities at Cusp sites roughly doubled between 2010 and 2011, reflecting the increasing EAB populations. Sticky bands on girdled trees captured the highest density of EAB beetles per m2 of area, while baited double-decker traps had the highest detection rates and captured the most beetles. Larval densities were higher on girdled ash than on similar ungirdled trees and small planted trees. Woodpecker predation and a native larval parasitoid were present in all three invasion regions but had minor effects on ash survival and EAB densities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx200

  7 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28967570
[Au] Autor:Welden NA; Wolseley PA; Ashmore MR
[Ad] Address:Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, UK; Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.
[Ti] Title:Citizen science identifies the effects of nitrogen deposition, climate and tree species on epiphytic lichens across the UK.
[So] Source:Environ Pollut;232:80-89, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6424
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A national citizen survey quantified the abundance of epiphytic lichens that are known to be either sensitive or tolerant to nitrogen (N) deposition. Records were collected across the UK from over 10,000 individual trees of 22 deciduous species. Mean abundance of tolerant and sensitive lichens was related to mean N deposition rates and climatic variables at a 5 km scale, and the response of lichens was compared on the three most common trees (Quercus, Fraxinus and Acer) and by assigning all 22 tree species to three bark pH groups. The abundance of N-sensitive lichens on trunks decreased with increasing total N deposition, while that of N-tolerant lichens increased. The abundance of N-sensitive lichens on trunks was reduced close to a busy road, while the abundance of N-tolerant lichens increased. The abundance of N-tolerant lichen species on trunks was lower on Quercus and other low bark pH species, but the abundance of N-sensitive lichens was similar on different tree species. Lichen abundance relationships with total N deposition did not differ between tree species or bark pH groups. The response of N-sensitive lichens to reduced nitrogen was greater than to oxidised N, and the response of N-tolerant lichens was greater to oxidised N than to reduced N. There were differences in the response of N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichens to rainfall, humidity and temperature. Relationships with N deposition and climatic variables were similar for lichen presence on twigs as for lichen abundance on trunks, but N-sensitive lichens increased, rather than decreased, on twigs of Quercus/low bark pH species. The results demonstrate the unique power of citizen science to detect and quantify the air pollution impacts over a wide geographical range, and specifically to contribute to understanding of lichen responses to different chemical forms of N deposition, local pollution sources and bark chemistry.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Air Pollutants/analysis
Environmental Monitoring/methods
Lichens/chemistry
Nitrogen/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acer
Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollution
Lichens/physiology
Quercus
Trees
United Kingdom
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Air Pollutants); N762921K75 (Nitrogen)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171003
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29404687
[Au] Autor:Chen Y; Wang X; Jiang B; Li L
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100085, China.
[Ti] Title:The leaf phenophase of deciduous species altered by land pavements.
[So] Source:Int J Biometeorol;, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1254
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:It has been widely reported that the urban environment alters leaf and flowering phenophases; however, it remains unclear if land pavement is correlated with these alterations. In this paper, two popular deciduous urban trees in northern China, ash (Fraxinus chinensis) and maple (Acer truncatum), were planted in pervious and impervious pavements at three spacings (0.5 m × 0.5 m, 1.0 m × 1.0 m, and 2.0 m × 2.0 m apart). The beginning and end dates of the processes of leaf budburst and senescence were recorded in spring and fall of 2015, respectively. The results show that leaf budburst and senescence were significantly advanced in pavement compared to non-pavement lands. The date of full leaf budburst was earlier by 0.7-9.3 days for ash and by 0.3-2.3 days for maple under pavements than non-pavements, respectively. As tree spacing increases, the advanced days of leaf budburst became longer. Our results clearly indicate that alteration of leaf phenophases is attributed to land pavement, which should be taken into consideration in urban planning and urban plant management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00484-018-1497-3

  9 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29396790
[Au] Autor:Lemmen-Lechelt JK; Wist TJ; Evenden ML
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, CW405 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada. jlemmen@ualberta.ca.
[Ti] Title:State-Dependent Plasticity in Response to Host-Plant Volatiles in a Long-Lived Moth, Caloptilia fraxinella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae).
[So] Source:J Chem Ecol;, 2018 Feb 03.
[Is] ISSN:1573-1561
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Volatile chemicals produced by plants mediate host location, mate-finding and oviposition behavior in insects. State-dependent response to plant cues allows for timing of foraging, mating and oviposition on ephemeral host plants or plant parts. Caloptilia fraxinella is a herbivorous specialist on the foliage of ash trees (Fraxinus). Adults are long-lived and undergo a nine-month reproductive diapause over the fall and winter. Mating and oviposition occur in the spring when volatile chemicals released by ash leaves mediate host location. This study tested the plasticity of olfactory response of C. fraxinella to host plant volatiles using both electroantennogram and behavioral bioassays. The effect of moth physiological state on olfactory response was tested on male and female moths in different nutritional, mating, and diapause states. Antennal responses to host plant volatiles were plastic and depended on moth physiological state, and were highest when moths were reproductively active and would be seeking oviposition hosts. Moth sex and nutritional status also impacted antennal response to host plant volatiles. Oriented flight of females to ash seedlings varied with physiological state and nutritional status, with fed, reproductively active females having the highest response. Physiological state impacted oriented flight of males to female-produced sex pheromone signals whether or not a host plant was present, and there was no increase in behavioral response to sex pheromone in the presence of an ash host.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10886-018-0927-3

  10 / 785 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29199255
[Au] Autor:Tanahashi T
[Ad] Address:Kobe Pharmaceutical University.
[Ti] Title:[Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Some Medicinal Plants and Cultivated Lichen Mycobionts].
[So] Source:Yakugaku Zasshi;137(12):1443-1482, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1347-5231
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:Studies on the structural determination, biosynthesis, and biological activities of secondary metabolites from natural sources are significant in the field of natural products chemistry. This review focuses on diverse secondary metabolites isolated from medicinal plants and cultivated mycobionts of lichens in our laboratory. Monoterpene-tetrahydroisoquinoline glycosides and alkaloids isolated from Cephaelis acuminata and Alangium lamarckii gave important information on the biosynthesis of ipecac alkaloids. A variety of glycosides linked with a secologanin unit and indole alkaloids were obtained from medicinal plants belonging to the families of Rubiaceae, Apocynaceae, and Loganiaceae. Plant species of the four genera Fraxinus, Syringa, Jasminum, and Ligustrum of the family Oleaceae were chemically investigated to provide several types of secoiridoid and iridoid glucosides. The biosynthetic pathway leading from protopine to benzophenanthridine alkaloids in suspension cell cultures of Eschscholtzia californica was elucidated. The structures and biological activities of the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids of Stephania cepharantha and Nelumbo nucifera were also investigated. In addition, the mycobionts of lichens were cultivated to afford various types of metabolites that differ from the lichen substances of intact lichens but are structurally similar to fungal metabolites. The biosynthetic origins of some metabolites were also studied. These findings suggest that cultures of lichen mycobionts could be sources of new bioactive compounds and good systems for investigating secondary metabolism in lichens.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/isolation & purification
Glycosides/isolation & purification
Lichens/metabolism
Plants, Medicinal/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alangiaceae/metabolism
Alkaloids/biosynthesis
Alkaloids/chemistry
Benzylisoquinolines
Cephaelis/metabolism
Eschscholzia/metabolism
Glycosides/biosynthesis
Glycosides/chemistry
Iridoids
Monoterpenes
Oleaceae/metabolism
Rubiaceae/metabolism
Stephania/metabolism
Tetrahydroisoquinolines
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Alkaloids); 0 (Benzylisoquinolines); 0 (Glycosides); 0 (Iridoids); 0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Tetrahydroisoquinolines); 56W89FBX3E (1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1248/yakushi.17-00147


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