Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Fusobacterium and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29306533
[Au] Autor:Zandi H; Kristoffersen AK; Ørstavik D; Rôças IN; Siqueira JF; Enersen M
[Ad] Address:Department of Endodontics, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: homanz@odont.uio.no.
[Ti] Title:Microbial Analysis of Endodontic Infections in Root-filled Teeth with Apical Periodontitis before and after Irrigation Using Pyrosequencing.
[So] Source:J Endod;44(3):372-378, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3554
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The root canal microbiota in root-filled teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis before and after chemomechanical instrumentation and irrigation with either 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) or 2% chlorhexidine digluconate were analyzed by using the pyrosequencing method. METHODS: Samples from 10 root-filled teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing retreatment were taken before (S1) and after (S2) preparation using irrigation with either NaOCl (n = 5) or 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (n = 5). DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V5) variable regions were amplified and subjected to pyrosequencing (GS junior 454) to determine the bacterial composition. RESULTS: Pyrosequencing yielded 43,797 sequence reads in S1 and 9196 in S2 samples. Overall, 125 bacterial species belonging to 68 genera (S1, 59; S2, 38) and 9 phyla were found. The most abundant and prevalent phyla in S1 and S2 samples were Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The most represented, abundant, and prevalent genera in S1 and S2 samples were Streptococcus and Fusobacterium. The most prevalent species in S1 and S2 samples were Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. vincentii, Streptococcus oralis/mitis, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus gordonii. The mean number of species per root canal was 20 (range, 4-37) in S1 and 9 (range, 4-15) in S2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A high interindividual diversity was observed in both S1 and S2 samples, with no difference between the two irrigation groups. F. nucleatum ss. vincentii and some Streptococcus species were the most prevalent species in pre-preparation and post-preparation samples during retreatment of root-filled teeth with infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29307651
[Au] Autor:Corona PS; Lung M; Rodriguez-Pardo D; Pigrau C; Soldado F; Amat C; Carrera L
[Ad] Address:Septic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: pcorona@vhebron.net.
[Ti] Title:Acute periprosthetic joint infection due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in a non-immunocompromised patient. Failure using a Debridement, Antibiotics + Implant retention approach.
[So] Source:Anaerobe;49:116-120, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8274
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fusobacterium nucleatum is an obligately anaerobic gram-negative rod, a component of the microbiome of the oropharynx and the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts, causing an array of human infections which often include periodontal pathologies. As far as we know, there are no previous publications about acute periprosthetic joint infection due to Fusobacterium sp.; we report the first case in the medical literature of an aggressive, acute knee prosthetic infection due to F. nucleatum in a non-immunocompromised patient, unsuccessfully treated with a DAIR approach (Debridement + Antibiotics + Implant Retention).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29293651
[Au] Autor:Rôças IN; Siqueira JF
[Ad] Address:Department of Endodontics and Molecular Microbiology Laboratory, Estácio de Sá University, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Frequency and levels of candidate endodontic pathogens in acute apical abscesses as compared to asymptomatic apical periodontitis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190469, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Acute apical abscess is caused by bacteria that leave the infected dental root canal to invade the periodontal tissues. Most species occurring in abscesses are also found in asymptomatic infections; therefore, the possibility exists that not only the presence of certain species but also their specific counts influence the appearance of symptoms. This molecular study compared the frequency and levels of several candidate endodontic pathogens in teeth with acute apical abscesses and asymptomatic apical periodontitis. METHODS: Samples were taken from the root canals of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis (n = 73) and by aspiration of purulent exudate from acute abscesses (n = 55). DNA was extracted from samples and bacterial identifications were performed by a closed-ended semi-quantitative reverse-capture checkerboard approach targeting 40 bacterial species/phylotypes. RESULTS: Bacterial DNA was detected in all cases. In abscesses, the most prevalent taxa were Fusobacterium nucleatum (60%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (53%), Parvimonas micra (51%), and Streptococcus species (45%). The most frequently detected taxa in asymptomatic teeth were P. endodontalis (63%), Dialister invisus (58%), Olsenella uli (56%), and F. nucleatum (51%). None of the targeted taxa were significantly associated with abscesses when only mere presence was evaluated (p>0.05). However, semi-quantitative data demonstrated that P. endodontalis, Prevotella baroniae, Treponema denticola and Streptococcus species were significantly more frequent at levels >105 in abscesses than in asymptomatic cases (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: None of the target species/phylotypes were associated with abscesses in terms of frequency. However, some taxa were significantly found in higher levels in abscesses. Presence of a potentially virulent pathogen in high counts may increase the collective pathogenicity of the bacterial community and give rise to symptoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abscess/microbiology
Bacteria/isolation & purification
Periapical Periodontitis/microbiology
Tooth Apex/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacteria/classification
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190469

  4 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29436449
[Au] Autor:Vijay V; Fattah Z
[Ad] Address:Royal London Hospital, London, UK vivek.vijay1@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Lesson of the month 1: Lemierre's syndrome: a reminder of the 'forgotten disease'.
[So] Source:Clin Med (Lond);18(1):100-102, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1473-4893
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lemierre's syndrome is a condition characterised by suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular (IJ) vein following a recent oropharyngeal infection, with resulting septicaemia and metastatic lesions. It is strongly associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative bacilli. Key to early diagnosis is awareness of the classical history and course of this illness, and therefore to ask about a history of recent oropharyngeal infections when a young patient presents with fever and rigors. Diagnosis can be confirmed by showing thrombophlebitis of the IJ vein, culturing F necrophorum from normally sterile sites or demonstrating metastatic lesions in this clinical setting. The cornerstone of management is draining of purulent collection where possible and prolonged courses of appropriate antibiotics. In this article, we review a case study of a young man with Lemierre's syndrome and discuss the condition in more detail.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7861/clinmedicine.18-1-100

  5 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29396061
[Au] Autor:Lee JJ; Lien CY; Chien CC; Huang CR; Tsai NW; Chang CC; Lu CH; Chang WN
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29389826
[Au] Autor:Sheth SP; Ilkanich P; Congeni B
[Ad] Address:Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA.
[Ti] Title:Complicated Fusobacterium Sinusitis: A Case Report.
[So] Source:Pediatr Infect Dis J;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0987
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fusobacterium infections and Lemierre Syndrome are traditionally associated with pharyngitis. We report three cases of Fusobacterium sinusitis that resulted in Pott Puffy Tumor. One of these cases also had Lemierre Syndrome. We encourage expansion of the clinical spectrum of Lemierre Syndrome to include complicated Fusobacterium sinusitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000001927

  7 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29327500
[Au] Autor:Pattanshetty S; Kotrashetti VS; Bhat K; Nayak RS; Somannavar P; Pujar M
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G Halgekar's Institute of Dental Sciences, Karnataka, India.
[Ti] Title:Multiplex polymerase chain reaction detection of selected bacterial species from symptomatic and asymptomatic non-vital teeth with primary endodontic infections.
[So] Source:J Investig Clin Dent;, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1626
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of selective anaerobic microorganisms in primary root canal infections of symptomatic and asymptomatic non-vital teeth with periapical pathosis using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. METHODS: A total of 100 root canal samples (50 from symptomatic and 50 from asymptomatic teeth) were obtained from patients with primary endodontic infections. DNA extracted from the samples was amplified by using specific primers for the 16S rRNA gene of each bacterium, and semiquantification was done to analyze the prevalence of microorganisms and their correlation to clinical features. RESULTS: Treponema denticola (T. denticola) was present in 21 (42%) and 29 (58%) samples in the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, respectively. Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) were significantly high (P < .05) in the symptomatic group, whereas Prevotella intermedia was significantly high (P < .05) in the asymptomatic group. The mean counts of T. denticola and F. nucleatum were significantly high (P < .05) in the symptomatic group. For symptoms, P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and F. nucleatum were significantly associated with clinical features. CONCLUSION: Significant differences exist in the bacterial composition between asymptomatic and symptomatic primary endodontic infections. As well as presence of pathogens, other factors, such as the phenotypic trait of bacteria and interactions among bacterial members, might play a determining role in the pathogenicity of primary endodontic infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jicd.12312

  8 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29179775
[Au] Autor:Smith-Singares E; Boachie JA; Iglesias IM; Jaffe L; Goldkind A; Jeng EI
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Critical Care, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 60612, IL, USA. singares@uic.edu.
[Ti] Title:Fusobacterium emphysematous pyomyositis with necrotizing fasciitis of the leg presenting as compartment syndrome: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;11(1):332, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fusobacterium necrophorum is a common agent of disease in humans, but the occurrence of primary infections outside the head and neck area is extremely rare. While infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum has a rather benign course above the thorax, the organism is capable of producing very severe disease when located in unusual sites, including various forms of septic thrombophlebitis. No infections of the leg have been documented before; thus, antibiotic coverage for Fusobacterium is currently not recommended in this area. CASE PRESENTATION: A 50-year-old homeless African-American man presented complaining of severe pain in his right lower extremity. A clinical workup was consistent with emphysematous pyomyositis and compartment syndrome; he received limb-saving surgical intervention. The offending organism was identified as Fusobacterium necrophorum, and the antibiotic coverage was adjusted accordingly. CONCLUSIONS: Bacteria typically involved in necrotizing infections of the lower extremity include Group A ß-hemolytic Streptococcus, Clostridium perfringens, and common anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides, Peptococcus, and Peptostreptococcus). This case report presents a case of gas gangrene of the leg caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, the first such case reported. Fusobacterium should now be included in the differential diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1493-y

  9 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29026618
[Au] Autor:Cleaver LM; Palanivel S; Mack D; Warren S
[Ad] Address:Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:A case of polymicrobial anaerobic spondylodiscitis due to and .
[So] Source:JMM Case Rep;4(4):e005092, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2053-3721
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here, we present a case of polymicrobial anaerobic spondylodiscitis. A forty-five year-old female patient was referred to a specialist orthopaedic hospital with an eight week history of back pain without fevers. X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging showed acute osteomyelitis of the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae. Prolonged enrichment cultures grew and , identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS). The patient was successfully treated with six weeks of intravenous ertapenem and oral clindamycin. Anaerobic discitis is rare, and polymicrobial discitis is rarer still. A PubMed literature review revealed only seven cases of discitis and only twelve cases of discitis; this includes only one other reported case of a polymicrobial discitis due to infection with both anaerobes. We emphasise the importance of prolonging enrichment culture and the use of fast yet accurate identification of anaerobes using MALDI-ToF MS in these infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171017
[Lr] Last revision date:171017
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmmcr.0.005092

  10 / 2248 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29021252
[Au] Autor:Casasanta MA; Yoo CC; Smith HB; Duncan AJ; Cochrane K; Varano AC; Allen-Vercoe E; Slade DJ
[Ad] Address:Virginia Tech, United States.
[Ti] Title:A chemical and biological toolbox for Type Vd secretion: Characterization of the phospholipase A1 autotransporter FplA from Fusobacterium nucleatum.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;, 2017 Oct 11.
[Is] ISSN:1083-351X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fusobacterium nucleatum is an oral pathogen that is linked to multiple human infections and colorectal cancer. Strikingly, F. nucleatum achieves virulence in the absence of large, multi-protein secretion systems (Type I, II, III, IV, and VI) which are widely used by Gram-negative bacteria for pathogenesis. By contrast, F. nucleatum strains contain genomic expansions of Type V secreted effectors (autotransporters) that are critical for host cell adherence, invasion, and biofilm formation. Here we present the first characterization of a F. nucleatum Type Vd phospholipase class A1 autotransporter (strain ATCC 25586, gene FN1704) that we hereby rename Fusobacterium phospholipase autotransporter (FplA). Biochemical analysis of multiple Fusobacterium strains revealed that FplA is expressed as a full-length 85 kDa outer membrane embedded protein, or as a truncated phospholipase domain that remains associated with the outer membrane. While the role of Type Vd secretion in bacteria remains unidentified, we show that FplA binds with high affinity to host phosphoinositide signaling lipids, revealing a potential role for this enzyme in establishing a F. nucleatum intracellular niche. To further analyze the role of FplA we developed an fplA gene knockout strain, which will guide future in vivo studies to determine its potential role in F. nucleatum pathogenesis. In summary, using recombinant FplA constructs we have identified a biochemical toolbox that includes lipid substrates for enzymatic assays, potent inhibitors, and chemical probes to detect, track, and characterize the role of Type Vd secreted phospholipases in Gram-negative bacteria.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171012
[Lr] Last revision date:171012
[St] Status:Publisher


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