Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Gastric and Dilatation [Words]
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[PMID]: 29512332
[Au] Autor:Payá-Llorente C; Martínez-Pérez A; Gómez-Abril SA; Armañanzas-Villena E
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Hospital Doctor Peset, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Laparoscopic management of gastric perforation secondary to mesenteroaxial volvulus in a patient with laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding.
[So] Source:Asian J Endosc Surg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1758-5910
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a 2-week history of alimentary vomiting. She had undergone laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding 6 years earlier. CT revealed a mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus and ischemia on the gastric wall. Emergent diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, and severe peritonitis and gastric necrosis caused by volvulation was found. After band removal, a fundal perforation was noted, but a viable lesser curvature enabled laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy to be performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is considered a safe and effective method for the surgical treatment of obesity, but it is associated with a number of complications, such as pouch dilatation and band slippage. Although infrequent, ischemic complications are life-threatening conditions that require urgent surgery. This is the first report of this unusual complication managed laparoscopically.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ases.12473

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[PMID]: 29512022
[Au] Autor:Joshi A; Falodia S; Kumar N; Solanki RL
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Sardar Patel Medical College, Bikaner, 334 001, India.
[Ti] Title:Small intestine strictures in opium addicts: An unrecognized cause of intestinal obstruction.
[So] Source:Indian J Gastroenterol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:0975-0711
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Strictures of the small intestine have been attributed many causes of Crohn's disease, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, neoplastic, post-surgical, and corrosive ingestion. Opium as a cause of small intestine strictures has not been described. Six cases of opium addicts diagnosed with small intestine strictures were selected after excluding the possible etiology of strictures. Investigations like upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy (in patients with small intestinal obstruction), barium meal follow-through, and histopathology of strictures were done in all patients. Among the six cases, two patients were diagnosed with small intestinal obstruction and four patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Histopathology of the strictures revealed marked thickening of submucosa with infiltration by lymphocytes, plasma cells, and plenty of eosinophils. There was dilatation of vessels and lymphatics. The granulomatous reaction was not seen. These histological features are suggestive of concentric fibrous thickening in submucosa with stricture formation possibly as a result of drug abuse like opioids and opioid-like products resulting in transient ischemia of the small intestine leading to fibrosis. Patients were managed by surgery and deaddiction treatment was given to prevent further complications. Opium and opioid-like drugs can cause small intestinal strictures causing ulceration and fibrosis in opioid-dependent patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12664-018-0831-3

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[PMID]: 29508272
[Au] Autor:Pasquer A; Pelascini E; Poncet G; Robert M
[Ad] Address:Department of Digestive and Bariatric Surgery, University Hospital of Edouard Herriot, Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France. arnaudp@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Laparoscopic Treatment of Gastro-Gastric Fistula After RYGB: Technical Points.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Postoperative abdominal pain after Roux en Y gastric bypass associated with gastro esophageal reflux is difficult to manage. A gastro-gastric fistula can be the etiology and besides pain and weight regain, it can also be revealed by a dilatation of the excluded stomach and duodenum. METHODS: We present the case of a 45-year-old woman who had a medical history of revisional RYGB after failure of gastric band. She recently complained of recurrent epigastric abdominal pain and biliary GERD. Upper gastro intestinal endoscopy found biliary reflux gastritis. The CT scan with gas expansion and opacification revealed a dilated excluded stomach and duodenum leading to the diagnosis of gastro-gastric fistula. Because of pain and GERD correlated to this radiological finding, we decided to perform an exploratory laparoscopy. The patient was placed in a half-sitting position, surgeon between the legs. A 12-mmHg pneumoperitoneum was made. A 4-port technique was used. The first step consisted of a complete adhesiolysis. The second step consisted in the dissection of the excluded stomach, stuck to the gastric pouch, and revealed two gastro-gastric fistulas treated by stapling. An epiploplasty was performed on the excluded stomach and the staple line of the gastric pouch was invaginated. RESULTS: Postoperative course was uneventful. One year later, she had no more reflux and no more pain. CONCLUSION: Causes of abdominal pain and GERD after RYGB are difficult to identify. Gastro-gastric fistula is one of them and should be evoked when biliary reflux and abdominal pain appear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3164-5

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[PMID]: 29256283
[Au] Autor:Nógrádi AL; Cope I; Balogh M; Gál J
[Ad] Address:1 Department and Clinic of Exotic Animal and Wildlife Medicine, University of Veterinary Medicine , István u. 2, H-1078 Budapest , Hungary.
[Ti] Title:Review of gastric torsion in eight guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).
[So] Source:Acta Vet Hung;65(4):487-499, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:0236-6290
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The authors present eight cases of gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in guinea pigs from the Department and Clinic of Exotic Animal and Wildlife Medicine, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary between 2012 and 2016. Seven animals were operated on and two survived. Gastric torsion has been noted in many mammalian species. Gastric volvulus has a high morbidity and high mortality rate with a guarded to poor prognosis in all of these species. How GDV develops is still not widely understood. Postmortem examinations, in both our cases and previously reported cases, have failed to reveal the exact causes of the gastric torsions. The aetiology of gastric torsion in guinea pigs is probably multifactorial. Feeding fewer meals per day, eating rapidly, decreased food particle size, exercise, stress after a meal, competition, age, and an aggressive or fearful temperament, are all likely and potential risk factors for GDV development in a similar fashion to dogs. Sex, breeding, dental diseases, anatomical abnormalities, pain and pregnancy may also be contributing factors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Guinea Pigs
Rodent Diseases/surgery
Stomach Volvulus/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Male
Rodent Diseases/etiology
Rodent Diseases/pathology
Stomach Volvulus/etiology
Stomach Volvulus/pathology
Stomach Volvulus/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/004.2017.046

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[PMID]: 29491312
[Au] Autor:Nishiie Y; Nagata N
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Acute Massive Gastric Dilatation in a Patient with an Eating Disorder.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.0576-17

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[PMID]: 29175931
[Au] Autor:Humm K; Barfield D
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK.
[Ti] Title:Differentiating between food bloat and gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(21):561-562, 2017 11 25.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gastric Dilatation
Intestinal Volvulus
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Dog Diseases
Dogs
Food
Stomach Volvulus
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5449

  7 / 3425 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394856
[Au] Autor:Noma T; Hirose H; Ide Y; Imamura H; Yagi Y; Mokutani Y; Hashimoto Y; Nagai K; Matsuyama J; Kubota M; Fukushima Y; Tamura S; Sasaki Y
[Ad] Address:Dept. of Surgery, Yao Municipal Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[A Case of Malignant Transformation of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas Accompanied by Metachronous Triple Primary Cancer].
[So] Source:Gan To Kagaku Ryoho;44(12):2026-2028, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0385-0684
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 70's woman with a history of abdominal surgery for gastric cancer visited our hospital for the evaluation of bleeding during defecation.We diagnosed her with advanced rectal cancer and performed laparoscopic low anterior resection.As postoperative pathological staging was pT3N2M0, pStage III b, we included CapeOx therapy as adjuvant chemotherapy.One year and 4 months after the surgery, lung and liver metastases were revealed by CT and PET-CT scans.At the same time, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct(intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: IPMN)was detected.Thus, we first performed liver resection and then lung resection.After the surgery, new lung nodules and a mass lesion with IPMN with superior mesenteric venous invasion was found on CT scans.We then administered chemo-radiation therapy(CRT).After CRT, the lung and pancreatic lesions seemed to decrease slightly.Accidentally, a nodule on the cystic bladder was found, resected by transurethral resection of the bladder tumor(TUR-Bt), and diagnosed as a bladder cancer.Thirty months after the rectal surgery, she is continuing the S-1 chemotherapy with stable disease.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 3425 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346056
[Au] Autor:Robin EM; Pey PB; de Fornel-Thibaud P; Moissonnier PHM; Freiche V
[Ti] Title:Esophageal leiomyoma in a dog causing esophageal distension and treated by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent.
[So] Source:J Am Vet Med Assoc;252(3):330-335, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1943-569X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CASE DESCRIPTION A 10-year-old spayed female Rottweiler was referred for evaluation because of a 2-month history of regurgitation and weight loss, despite no apparent change in appetite. The dog had received antiemetic and antacid treatment, without improvement. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a low body condition score (2/5), but other findings were unremarkable. Diffuse, global esophageal dilatation was noted on plain thoracic radiographs, and normal motility was confirmed through videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing. Transhepatic ultrasonographic and CT examination revealed a circumferential, intraparietal lesion in the distal portion of the esophagus causing distal esophageal or cardial subobstruction and no metastases. Incisional biopsy of the lesion was performed, and findings of histologic examination supported a diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In view of numerous possible complications associated with esophageal surgery, the decision was made to palliatively treat the dog by transcardial placement of a self-expanding, covered, nitinol esophageal stent under endoscopic guidance. Two weeks after stent placement, radiography revealed complete migration of the stent into the gastric lumen. Gastrotomy was performed, and the stent was replaced and fixed in place. Twenty-four months after initial stent placement, the dog had a healthy body condition and remained free of previous clinical signs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Diffuse benign muscular neoplasia should be considered as a differential diagnosis for acquired esophageal dilatation in adult and elderly dogs. In the dog of this report, transcardial stent placement resulted in resolution of the clinical signs, with no apparent adverse effect on digestive function. The described procedure could be beneficial for nonsurgical treatment of benign esophageal tumors in dogs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2460/javma.252.3.330

  9 / 3425 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29310410
[Au] Autor:Zhou Y; Wang F; Ji Y; Lv J
[Ad] Address:People Hospital of Jingjiang, Medical School of YangZhou University.
[Ti] Title:A CARE-compliant article: a case of retrograde intussusception with Uncut-Roux-en-Y anastomosis after radical total gastrectomy: Review of the literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(48):e8982, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Postoperative intussusception is an unusual clinical entity and is rarely encountered as a complication following gastrectomy, especially radical total gastrectomy. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of melena and hematemesis. And the endoscopic biopsy confirmed the poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Radical total gastrectomy with Uncut Roux-en-Y reconstruction was performed. On the third postoperative day (POD3), the patient complained of paroxysmal pain around the umbilicus, accompanied by nausea and vomiting. DIAGNOSIS: Retrograde intussusceptions after radical total gastrectomy with Uncut Roux-en-Y reconstruction based on exploratory laparotomy. INTERVENTIONS: On POD4, the abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed small bowel dilatation and fluid accumulation in the upper abdominal cavity, as well as a small mass of soft tissue on the left side of the pelvis. Small bowel obstruction was considered, and exploratory laparotomy was performed. Retrograde intussusception started just below the jejunojejunal anastomosis with possible organic lesions, which was subsequently removed. OUTCOMES: The patient recovered well and was discharged 15 days after the second operation. LESSONS: This case report was written for 3 purposes: to increase awareness of this complication after radical total gastrectomy with Uncut-Roux-en-Y reconstruction; to emphasize early diagnosis through clinical manifestation, physical examination, and auxiliary examination with abdominal CT; and lastly, to emphasize that a reasonable surgical procedure should be performed immediately after diagnosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y
Gastrectomy
Intestinal Diseases/etiology
Intussusception/etiology
Postoperative Complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenocarcinoma/diagnostic imaging
Adenocarcinoma/surgery
Aged
Female
Humans
Intestinal Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Intestinal Diseases/surgery
Intussusception/diagnostic imaging
Intussusception/surgery
Stomach Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Stomach Neoplasms/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008982

  10 / 3425 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29325788
[Au] Autor:Nojiri M; Yokoyama Y; Maeda T; Ebata T; Igami T; Sugawara G; Yamaguchi J; Nagino M
[Ad] Address:Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Impact of the gastrojejunal anatomic position as the mechanism of delayed gastric emptying after pancreatoduodenectomy.
[So] Source:Surgery;, 2018 Jan 08.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7361
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This study investigated the impact of gastrojejunal anatomic position on the incidence of delayed gastric emptying after pancreatoduodenectomy. METHODS: A total of 160 patients were included in the retrospective analysis. The relative anatomic position of the gastrojejunostomy was evaluated using coronal and sagittal plane computed tomography images on postoperative day 7; the coronal cardia anastomotic angle and the sagittal fundus anastomotic angle were measured. In the validation study, 64 consecutive patients were enrolled, and gastric emptying was evaluated using water-soluble contrast medium. The extent of gastric emptying was graded as grade I (no gastric dilatation and no stasis), grade II (gastric dilatation but no stasis), or grade III (gastric dilatation and stasis). RESULTS: Patients with grades B (n = 8) and C (n = 22) delayed gastric emptying were included in the delayed gastric emptying group (n = 30), and the others were included in the nondelayed gastric emptying group (n = 130). The coronal cardia anastomotic angle was not significantly different between the 2 groups, whereas the sagittal fundus anastomotic angle was significantly greater in the delayed gastric emptying group compared to the nondelayed gastric emptying group (median 50.3 vs 64.5 degrees, P < .001). Multivariate analysis, including various risk factors of delayed gastric emptying, indicated that a sagittal fundus anastomotic angle >60 degrees was the only independent risk factor of delayed gastric emptying (odds ratio, 16.59). In the validation study, the median degree of sagittal fundus anastomotic angle increased as the gastric emptying grade increased (grade I, 44.3 degrees; grade II, 55.3 degrees; grade III, 60.7 degrees; P = .014 by analysis of variance). CONCLUSION: The gastrojejunal anatomic position after pancreatoduodenectomy has a significant impact on the incidence of delayed gastric emptying. (Surgery 2017;160:XXX-XXX.).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:Publisher


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