Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Gastric and Fistula [Words]
References found : 7740 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 774 go to page                         

  1 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524185
[Au] Autor:Donatelli G; Guerriero L; Cereatti F; Arapis K; Dammaro C; Dumont JL; Fuks D; Perretta S
[Ad] Address:Unité d'Endoscopie Interventionnelle, Ramsay Générale de Santé, Hôpital Privé des Peupliers, 8 Place de l'Abbé G. Hénocque, 75013, Paris, France. donatelligianfranco@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic Fistula-jejunostomy for Chronic Gastro-jejunal Fistula After Sleeve Gastrectomy.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Proximal gastric leak is one of the most common complications after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Endoscopy is the gold standard treatment for acute staple-line leaks. Surgery is the most effective treatment modality in case of chronic fistula. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 55-year- old man presented an acute leak after LSG. The leak was treated with metal stent deployment with temporary closure. After 6 months, he presented leak recurrence with general sepsis, perigastric-infected collection, and gastro-jejunal fistula. RESULTS: Endoscopic internal drainage (EID) was performed; however, due to fistula persistence, a surgical procedure was proposed. The patient refused revisional surgery; therefore, endoscopic salvage procedure was decided. A fully covered metal stent was deployed in order to bypass the perigastric collection creating an endoscopic gastro-jejunal anastomosis. CONCLUSION: Revisional surgery is the gold standard treatment for chronic fistula after SG. Endoscopic treatment with SEMS deployment may be a sound option in selected cases especially after failure of other endoscopic techniques or refusal of revisional surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3193-0

  2 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29505533
[Au] Autor:Asakura K; Yanai S; Nakamura S; Kawaski K; Eizuka M; Ishida K; Endo M; Sugai T; Migita K; Matsumoto T
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University.
[Ti] Title:Familial Mediterranean fever mimicking Crohn disease: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9547, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common form of autoinflammatory disease. We report a rare case of FMF with gastrointestinal lesions mimicking Crohn disease. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 21-year-old Japanese man was referred to our institution, complaining of refractory diarrhea and weight loss of 14 kg during the past two years. He had presented with recurrent fever, abdominal pain, anal fistula and stomatitis. His father and one of his brothers had ulcerative colitis. Colonoscopy revealed longitudinal ulcers in the terminal ileum and aphthous erosions in the colorectum. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple linear erosions in the gastric corpus and circular erosions in the duodenal second portion. Biopsy from these lesions failed to detect epithelioid cell granulomas. DIAGNOSES: Analysis of the genomic DNA revealed compound heterozygous mutations of E148Q/L110P in exon 2 of MEFV gene, suggesting a diagnosis of FMF. INTERVENTIONS: The patient was subsequently given 0.5 mg of colchicine per day. OUTCOMES: Follow-up colonoscopy 6 months later demonstrated that both the longitudinal ulcers in the terminal ileum and aphthous lesions in the colorectum had completely disappeared. LESSONS: Our case suggests that patients with FMF possibly manifest gastrointestinal lesions mimicking Crohn disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Crohn Disease/diagnosis
Familial Mediterranean Fever/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Colonoscopy
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009547

  3 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29450630
[Au] Autor:Shibasaki S; Suda K; Nakauchi M; Nakamura T; Kadoya S; Kikuchi K; Inaba K; Uyama I
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Fujita Health University, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Toyoake, Aichi, 470-1192, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Outermost layer-oriented medial approach for infrapyloric nodal dissection in laparoscopic distal gastrectomy.
[So] Source:Surg Endosc;32(4):2137-2148, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2218
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Based on our experience of suprapancreatic nodal dissection in laparoscopic gastrectomy, we developed an outermost layer-oriented medial approach for infrapyloric nodal dissection. The objective of this single-institution retrospective study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and reproducibility of this novel and unique dissection procedure. METHODS: This approach can be performed in the same manner as suprapancreatic nodal dissection but by replacing the left gastric artery with the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA), the common hepatic artery with the anterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery (ASPDA), and the splenic artery with the gastroduodenal artery. It comprises five steps: (1) mobilization of the transverse mesocolon along the prepancreatic membrane, (2) medial dissection along the dissectable layer between the pancreatic head and the dorsal side of the right gastroepiploic vein (RGEV), (3) division of the RGEV and determination of the lateral and cranial borders, (4) dissection along the outermost layer of the RGEA and ASPDA and transection of the infrapyloric artery and RGEA, and (5) transection of the duodenal bulb. RESULTS: This novel method was applied in 112 patients who underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy from 2014 to 2015. The anatomical landmarks that we determined to appropriately identify the outermost layer were highly reproducible, and our novel procedure based on these landmarks was successfully completed in all cases, without any intraoperative complications. Furthermore, in all cases, no. 6 lymph nodes were fully and adequately dissected within the infrapyloric area anatomically defined in the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma ver. 14. Pancreatic fistula occurred only in 1.8% cases. CONCLUSIONS: This novel outermost layer-oriented medial approach is a robust procedure that may help laparoscopic surgeons in performing safe and reproducible infrapyloric nodal dissection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00464-018-6111-6

  4 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29247370
[Au] Autor:Giulianotti PC; Gonzalez-Heredia R; Esposito S; Masrur M; Gangemi A; Bianco FM
[Ad] Address:Division of General, Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 435E, mail code 958, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.
[Ti] Title:Trans-gastric pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction after pylorus-preserving robotic Whipple: a proposal for a standardized technique.
[So] Source:Surg Endosc;32(4):2169-2174, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2218
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A number of technical improvements regarding the pancreatic anastomosis have decreased the morbidity and mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy. However, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) remains is the most feared complication, and the ideal technique for pancreatic reconstruction is undetermined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database. Data were collected from all consecutive robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomies (RAPD), performed by a single surgeon, at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, between September 2007 and January 2016. RESULTS: A total of 28 consecutive patients (16 male and 12 female) who underwent a RAPD were included in this study. Patients had a mean age and mean BMI of 61.5 years (SD = 12.3) and 27 kg/m (SD = 4.9), respectively. The mean operative time was 468.2 min (SD = 73.7) and the average estimated blood loss was 216.1 ml (SD = 113.1). The mean length of hospitalization was 13.1 days (SD = 5.4). There was no clinically significant POPF registered. CONCLUSION: Trans-gastric pancreaticogastrostomy (TPG) represents a valid and feasible option as a pancreatic digestive reconstruction during RAPD. Initial results showed decreased incidence of POPF with an increased risk of postoperative bleeding. Our experience suggests that TPG might be safer than pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ); further studies are needed in order to confirm.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00464-017-5916-z

  5 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29214793
[Au] Autor:Yoon JK; Kim MD; Lee DY; Han SJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Mesocaval Shunt Creation for Jejunal Variceal Bleeding with Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis.
[So] Source:Yonsei Med J;59(1):162-166, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1976-2437
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The creation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a widely performed technique to relieve portal hypertension, and to manage recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in patients where medical and/or endoscopic treatments have failed. However, portosystemic shunt creation can be challenging in the presence of chronic portal vein occlusion. In this case report, we describe a minimally invasive endovascular mesocaval shunt creation with transsplenic approach for the management of recurrent variceal bleeding in a portal hypertension patient with intra- and extrahepatic portal vein occlusion.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Esophageal and Gastric Varices/complications
Esophageal and Gastric Varices/therapy
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/complications
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
Jejunum/pathology
Portacaval Shunt, Surgical
Portal Vein/pathology
Venous Thrombosis/complications
Venous Thrombosis/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Chronic Disease
Esophageal and Gastric Varices/diagnostic imaging
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging
Humans
Portal Vein/diagnostic imaging
Portal Vein/surgery
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3349/ymj.2018.59.1.162

  6 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28453755
[Au] Autor:Davidov Y; Ungar B; Bar-Yoseph H; Carter D; Haj-Natour O; Yavzori M; Chowers Y; Eliakim R; Ben-Horin S; Kopylov U
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Association of Induction Infliximab Levels With Clinical Response in Perianal Crohn's Disease.
[So] Source:J Crohns Colitis;11(5):549-555, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1876-4479
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The association of infliximab [IFX] trough levels with clinical and endoscopic outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease is well established. However, there is scarce data regarding the association of perianal fistula response with IFX. The aim of this study was to establish whether early induction infliximab levels and anti-infliximab antibodies [ATIs] are associated with perianal fistula response. Methods: Consecutive CD patients with perianal fistulae that were treated with IFX between 2008 and 2016 were included in the study. Response was defined as cessation or significant improvement of fistula drainage. Patients with unavailable IFX level or ATI measurements and/or missing clinical follow-up at Week 14 were excluded. Results: A total of 36 patients with perianal fistulae were included; 25/36 [69.4%] responded to treatment by Week 14. The median induction IFX levels at Weeks 2, 6 and 14 in the responders group at Week 14 were higher compared with those of the non-responders group [20/5.6 µg/mL, P = 0.0001; 13.3/2.55 µg/mL P = 0.0001; 4.1/0.14 µg/mL, P = 0.01]. On multivariate analysis, IFX leve at Weeks 2 and 6 were significantly associated with fistula response at Weeks 14 and 30. IFX drug levels of 9.25 µg/mL at Week 2 and 7.25 µg/mL at Week 6 were the best predictors of fistula response. Conclusion: High IFX trough levels during induction are associated with favorable fistula response to anti-TNF treatment. If validated in a larger prospective study, our findings may help guide anti-TNF treatment in patients with perianal CD, and suggest serum level-guided treatment escalation in non-responders or prompt changing of biologic treatment in non-responders.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Crohn Disease/drug therapy
Gastrointestinal Agents/therapeutic use
Infliximab/therapeutic use
Rectal Fistula/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Crohn Disease/complications
Female
Gastrointestinal Agents/administration & dosage
Gastrointestinal Agents/blood
Humans
Infliximab/administration & dosage
Infliximab/blood
Male
Rectal Fistula/drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Gastrointestinal Agents); B72HH48FLU (Infliximab)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjw182

  7 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29509537
[Au] Autor:Oprisanescu D; Bucur D; Sandru V; Nedelcu IC; Ilie M; Oprita R; Constantinescu G
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic Treatment of Benign Esophageal Fistulas Using Fully-covered Metallic Esophageal Stents.
[So] Source:Chirurgia (Bucur);113(1):108-115, 2018 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1221-9118
[Cp] Country of publication:Romania
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Non-malignant esophageal fistulas have a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological features and it`s important to learn to detect and treat them, due to significant morbidity, mortality and costs. The need for minimally invasive, efficient and also quick procedures is imperative. Esophageal stenting using fully-covered expandable stents has become an increasingly preferred option and addresses to fistulas which arise from 2-3 cm beyond Killian's mouth and up to the gastroesophageal junction. The long-term purpose of the procedure is closure of the fistula and thus healing. A second goal would be avoiding the complications generated by long-term wearing of the stent, such as gastrointestinal perforation and stenosis. OBJECTIVES: This review focuses on the efficacy of fully-covered metallic stents in treating benign esophageal fistulas. To this effect, we performed a retrospective study on 21 patients admitted in our clinic between January 2014 and April 2017 for non-malignant esophageal fistulas. The selection criteria were the following: post-operative fistulas (gastric sleeve, fundoplication for transhiatal gastric hernia, even malignancies for which surgical tumor removal was performed), foreign body acquired fistulas, post-traumatic fistulas. Esophago-jejunal anastomotic fistulas were also included in the study (following complete gastrectomy). The efficacy of esophageal stenting was proven in 76% of the cases, resulting in fistula closure. The rest of the patients either didn't achieve fistula closure or couldn't tolerate the stent, calling for early removal of the prosthesis. Reintervention procedures such as stent repositioning or stent replacement (with higher diameter) were carried out in 42% of the cases. A percentage of 19% of the patients who achieved fistula closure developed esophageal stricture on stent-induced ulcers and needed recalibration stenting or esophageal Savary dilation. 22% of the cases needed surgical drainage for infected collections developed simultaneously. We recorded 2 deaths, unrelated to the stenting procedure. Patients who didn't acquire fistula closure were referred to thoracic surgery in good physical condition. Fully-covered metallic esophageal stents can be successfully used to treat benign esophageal fistulas. Follow-up of the patient in order to see if stent repositioning or replacement is needed is crucial. Special design esophageal stents are highly recommended and must not lack. Close cooperation with thoracic surgery is indispensable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29508272
[Au] Autor:Pasquer A; Pelascini E; Poncet G; Robert M
[Ad] Address:Department of Digestive and Bariatric Surgery, University Hospital of Edouard Herriot, Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France. arnaudp@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Laparoscopic Treatment of Gastro-Gastric Fistula After RYGB: Technical Points.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Postoperative abdominal pain after Roux en Y gastric bypass associated with gastro esophageal reflux is difficult to manage. A gastro-gastric fistula can be the etiology and besides pain and weight regain, it can also be revealed by a dilatation of the excluded stomach and duodenum. METHODS: We present the case of a 45-year-old woman who had a medical history of revisional RYGB after failure of gastric band. She recently complained of recurrent epigastric abdominal pain and biliary GERD. Upper gastro intestinal endoscopy found biliary reflux gastritis. The CT scan with gas expansion and opacification revealed a dilated excluded stomach and duodenum leading to the diagnosis of gastro-gastric fistula. Because of pain and GERD correlated to this radiological finding, we decided to perform an exploratory laparoscopy. The patient was placed in a half-sitting position, surgeon between the legs. A 12-mmHg pneumoperitoneum was made. A 4-port technique was used. The first step consisted of a complete adhesiolysis. The second step consisted in the dissection of the excluded stomach, stuck to the gastric pouch, and revealed two gastro-gastric fistulas treated by stapling. An epiploplasty was performed on the excluded stomach and the staple line of the gastric pouch was invaginated. RESULTS: Postoperative course was uneventful. One year later, she had no more reflux and no more pain. CONCLUSION: Causes of abdominal pain and GERD after RYGB are difficult to identify. Gastro-gastric fistula is one of them and should be evoked when biliary reflux and abdominal pain appear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3164-5

  9 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29508269
[Au] Autor:Wang EY; Shope TR
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 106 Irving Street NW, Physicians Office Building South Tower Suite 301, Washington, DC, 20010, USA.
[Ti] Title:Specialty Article: so You Think You Got a Bypass? A Case Series of Adventures in Bariatric Surgery.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To raise awareness for surgeons encountering bariatric patients with anatomy that deviates from the standard Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This is a single-institution retrospective case series over 12 years (2003-2014) involving patients who believed they received RYGBs, but actually did not. Data was obtained reviewing physician encounters, imaging, and operative reports. There were six cases with confusing clinical pictures, found to have aberrant RYGB anatomy: (1) gastric bypass with jejuno-jejunostomy only without gastrojejunostomy, (2) distal partial vertical gastrectomy without expected prosthetic band, (3) inverse vertical banded gastroplasty, (4) non-divided gastric bypass with no gastrojejunostomy, (5) 20-cm Roux limb, with gastro-gastric fistula, and (6) 200-cm bilio-pancreatic limb similar to the traditional Scopinaro procedure. There are cases of "Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses" that have no resemblance to the named procedure at all. Adjunctive upper gastrointestinal studies and upper endoscopies help surgeons make diagnoses that are incongruent with the surgical history. It is important to keep in mind that there could be anatomic or surgical variations which were born out of necessity or based on other surgeons' creativities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3149-4

  10 / 7740 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29500673
[Au] Autor:Amateau SK; Lim CH; McDonald NM; Arain M; Ikramuddin S; Leslie DB
[Ad] Address:Interventional and Therapeutic Endoscopy, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical Center, MMC 36-420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. amateau@umn.edu.
[Ti] Title:EUS-Guided Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Anastomosis with Lumen-Apposing Metal Stent: Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy.
[So] Source:Obes Surg;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1708-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traditionally, restoration of normal bowel continuity after resection and bypass of a diseased or obstructed gastrointestinal tract can only be achieved through surgery, which can be technically challenging and comes with a risk of adverse events. Here, we describe our institutions' experience with endoscopic-guided gastroenterostomy or enteroenterostomy with lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS) from March 2015 to August 2016. Ten patients had gastrogastrostomy (gastric pouch to gastric remnant) and three patients had jejunogastrostomy (Roux limb to gastric remnant) for the reversal of Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery. One patient had gastroduodenostomy (stomach to duodenal bulb) post antrectomy and one patient had jejunojejunostomy for distal obstruction following Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Technical and clinical success were achieved in all patients, save for delayed anastomotic stenosis following stent removal in one patient, with a mean follow-up of 126 days (3-318 days) with minimal complications in two patients. Endoscopic gastrointestinal anastomosis therefore may be a safe and feasible technique to re-establish continuity of the digestive system following bypass in the short-term.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11695-018-3171-6


page 1 of 774 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information