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[PMID]: 29247027
[Au] Autor:Abdusalam A; Tan D; Chang SM
[Ad] Address:Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Grassland Resources and Ecology and Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Western Arid Region Grassland Resources and Ecology, College of Grassland and Environment Sciences, Xinjiang Agricultural University, Ürümqi 830052, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Sexual expression and reproductive output in the ephemeral are correlated with environmental conditions.
[So] Source:Am J Bot;104(12):1920-1929, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Abiotic environmental factors are often considered to be important in the distribution and maintenance of variation in sexual systems in flowering plants. Associations between sexes and abiotic factors are well documented in dioecious systems, but much less is known about this relationship in other sexually polymorphic systems. Species that are highly variable in sexual expression and habitat distribution can provide insights into the role of abiotic factors in maintaining variation in sexual expression. METHODS: Focusing on a sexually polymorphic species, , we measured sexual expression at both the flower and the plant level and examined vegetative and floral traits, pollen deposition, and reproductive success. We also tested for correlations between sexual expression and other traits and examined whether and how these traits covaried with abiotic environmental conditions. KEY RESULTS: We identified unique variation of sexual expression in . . There are four sexual morphs that display different combinations of the three flower types (pistillate, staminate, and perfect). Sexual morphs that are phenotypically more female (i.e., female and gynomonoecious morphs) are found in wetter and milder environments, and flower earlier than morphs that are more male (i.e., hermaphroditic and andromonoecious morphs). Additionally, floral organ size and reproductive success are influenced not only by the flower type but also by the sexual morph of the plant. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental conditions are likely to cause some of the variation in sexual expression found in . . Both genetic and ecological factors likely contribute to the maintenance of sexual variation in this species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Flowers/anatomy & histology
Geranium/physiology
Seeds/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Flowers/physiology
Pollination
Reproduction/physiology
Soil
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3732/ajb.1700258

  2 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28743644
[Au] Autor:Schmidt-Lebuhn AN; Aitken NC; Chuah A
[Ad] Address:CSIRO, Australian National Herbarium, Clunies Ross Street, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Electronic address: Alexander.S-L@csiro.au.
[Ti] Title:Species trees from consensus single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data: Testing phylogenetic approaches with simulated and empirical data.
[So] Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol;116:192-201, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9513
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Datasets of hundreds or thousands of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) from multiple individuals per species are increasingly used to study population structure, species delimitation and shallow phylogenetics. The principal software tool to infer species or population trees from SNP data is currently the BEAST template SNAPP which uses a Bayesian coalescent analysis. However, it is computationally extremely demanding and tolerates only small amounts of missing data. We used simulated and empirical SNPs from plants (Australian Craspedia, Asteraceae, and Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) to compare species trees produced (1) by SNAPP, (2) using SVD quartets, and (3) using Bayesian and parsimony analysis with several different approaches to summarising data from multiple samples into one set of traits per species. Our aims were to explore the impact of tree topology and missing data on the results, and to test which data summarising and analyses approaches would best approximate the results obtained from SNAPP for empirical data. SVD quartets retrieved the correct topology from simulated data, as did SNAPP except in the case of a very unbalanced phylogeny. Both methods failed to retrieve the correct topology when large amounts of data were missing. Bayesian analysis of species level summary data scoring the two alleles of each SNP as independent characters and parsimony analysis of data scoring each SNP as one character produced trees with branch length distributions closest to the true trees on which SNPs were simulated. For empirical data, Bayesian inference and Dollo parsimony analysis of data scored allele-wise produced phylogenies most congruent with the results of SNAPP. In the case of study groups divergent enough for missing data to be phylogenetically informative (because of additional mutations preventing amplification of genomic fragments or bioinformatic establishment of homology), scoring of SNP data as a presence/absence matrix irrespective of allele content might be an additional option. As this depends on sampling across species being reasonably even and a random distribution of non-informative instances of missing data, however, further exploration of this approach is needed. Properly chosen data summary approaches to inferring species trees from SNP data may represent a potential alternative to currently available individual-level coalescent analyses especially for quick data exploration and when dealing with computationally demanding or patchy datasets.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Computer Simulation
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bayes Theorem
Software
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180115
[Lr] Last revision date:180115
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28961907
[Au] Autor:Jeiter J; Hilger HH; Smets EF; Weigend M
[Ad] Address:Nees-Institut für Biodiversität der Pflanzen, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 170, D-53115 Bonn, Germany.
[Ti] Title:The relationship between nectaries and floral architecture: a case study in Geraniaceae and Hypseocharitaceae.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;120(5):791-803, 2017 Nov 10.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Flowers of Geraniaceae and Hypseocharitaceae are generally considered as morphologically simple. However, previous studies indicated complex diversity in floral architecture including tendencies towards synorganization. Most of the species have nectar-rewarding flowers which makes the nectaries a key component of floral organization and architecture. Here, the development of the floral nectaries is studied and placed into the context of floral architecture. Methods: Seven species from Geraniaceae and one from Hypseocharitaceae were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Samples were prepared and processed using standard protocols. Key Results: The development of the nectary glands follows the same trajectory in all species studied. Minor differences occur in the onset of nectarostomata development. The most striking finding is the discovery that a short anthophore develops via intercalary growth at the level of the nectary glands. This anthophore lifts up the entire flower apart from the nectary gland itself and thus plays an important role in floral architecture, especially in the flowers of Pelargonium. Here, the zygomorphic flowers show a particularly extensive receptacular growth, resulting in the formation of a spur-like receptacular cavity ('inner spur'). The nectary gland is hidden at the base of the cavity. Various forms of compartmentalization, culminating in the 'revolver flower' of Geranium maderense, are described. Conclusions: Despite the superficial similarity of the flowers in Geraniaceae and Hypseocharitaceae, there is broad diversity in floral organization and floral architecture. While the receptacular origin of the spur-like cavity in Pelargonium had already been described, anthophore formation via intercalary growth of the receptacle in the other genera had not been previously documented. In the context of the most recent phylogenies of the families, an evolutionary series for the floral architecture is proposed, underscoring the importance of synorganization in these seemingly simple flowers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171114
[Lr] Last revision date:171114
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx101

  4 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28924942
[Au] Autor:Pereira ASP; Bester MJ; Apostolides Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Hillcrest, Pretoria, 0083, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Exploring the anti-proliferative activity of Pelargonium sidoides DC with in silico target identification and network pharmacology.
[So] Source:Mol Divers;21(4):809-820, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1573-501X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pelargonium sidoides DC (Geraniaceae) is a medicinal plant indigenous to Southern Africa that has been widely evaluated for its use in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. In recent studies, the anti-proliferative potential of P. sidoides was shown, and several phenolic compounds were identified as the bioactive compounds. Little, however, is known regarding their anti-proliferative protein targets. In this study, the anti-proliferative mechanisms of P. sidoides through in silico target identification and network pharmacology methodologies were evaluated. The protein targets of the 12 phenolic compounds were identified using the target identification server PharmMapper and the server for predicting Drug Repositioning and Adverse Reactions via the Chemical-Protein Interactome (DRAR-CPI). Protein-protein and protein-pathway interaction networks were subsequently constructed with Cytoscape 3.4.0 to evaluate potential mechanisms of action. A total of 142 potential human target proteins were identified with the in silico target identification servers, and 90 of these were found to be related to cancer. The protein interaction network was constructed from 86 proteins involved in 209 interactions with each other, and two protein clusters were observed. A pathway enrichment analysis identified over 80 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways enriched with the protein targets and included several pathways specifically related to cancer as well as various signaling pathways that have been found to be dysregulated in cancer. These results indicate that the anti-proliferative activity of P. sidoides may be multifactorial and arises from the collective regulation of several interconnected cell signaling pathways.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11030-017-9769-0

  5 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28854633
[Au] Autor:Park S; Ruhlman TA; Weng ML; Hajrah NH; Sabir JSM; Jansen RK
[Ad] Address:Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin.
[Ti] Title:Contrasting Patterns of Nucleotide Substitution Rates Provide Insight into Dynamic Evolution of Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes of Geranium.
[So] Source:Genome Biol Evol;9(6):1766-1780, 2017 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1759-6653
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Geraniaceae have emerged as a model system for investigating the causes and consequences of variation in plastid and mitochondrial genomes. Incredible structural variation in plastid genomes (plastomes) and highly accelerated evolutionary rates have been reported in selected lineages and functional groups of genes in both plastomes and mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes), and these phenomena have been implicated in cytonuclear incompatibility. Previous organelle genome studies have included limited sampling of Geranium, the largest genus in the family with over 400 species. This study reports on rates and patterns of nucleotide substitutions in plastomes and mitogenomes of 17 species of Geranium and representatives of other Geraniaceae. As detected across other angiosperms, substitution rates in the plastome are 3.5 times higher than the mitogenome in most Geranium. However, in the branch leading to Geranium brycei/Geranium incanum mitochondrial genes experienced significantly higher dN and dS than plastid genes, a pattern that has only been detected in one other angiosperm. Furthermore, rate accelerations differ in the two organelle genomes with plastomes having increased dN and mitogenomes with increased dS. In the Geranium phaeum/Geranium reflexum clade, duplicate copies of clpP and rpoA genes that experienced asymmetric rate divergence were detected in the single copy region of the plastome. In the case of rpoA, the branch leading to G. phaeum/G. reflexum experienced positive selection or relaxation of purifying selection. Finally, the evolution of acetyl-CoA carboxylase is unusual in Geraniaceae because it is only the second angiosperm family where both prokaryotic and eukaryotic ACCases functionally coexist in the plastid.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170903
[Lr] Last revision date:170903
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/gbe/evx124

  6 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28852053
[Au] Autor:García-Aloy S; Sanmartín I; Kadereit G; Vitales D; Millanes AM; Roquet C; Vargas P; Alarcón M; Aldasoro JJ
[Ad] Address:Institut Botànic de Barcelona (IBB-CSIC-ICUB), Passeig del Migdia s/n, Parc de Montjuïc, E-08038, Barcelona, Spain. sara.garcia.aloy@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Opposite trends in the genus Monsonia (Geraniaceae): specialization in the African deserts and range expansions throughout eastern Africa.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;7(1):9872, 2017 Aug 29.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The African Austro-temperate Flora stands out by its important species richness. A distinctive element of this flora is Monsonia (Geraniaceae), mostly found in the Namib-Karoo but also in the Natal-Drakensberg, the Somalian Zambezian and the Saharo-Arabian regions. Here, we reconstruct the evolution and biogeographic history of Monsonia based on nuclear and plastid markers, and examine the role of morphological and niche evolution in its diversification using species distribution modeling and macroevolutionary models. Our results indicate that Monsonia first diversified in the Early Miocene c.21 Ma, coinciding with the start of desertification in southwestern Africa. An important diversification occurred c. 4-6 Ma, after a general cooling trend in western South Africa and the rising of the Eastern African Mountains. The resulting two main lineages of Monsonia are constituted by: (1) Namib-Karoo succulents, and (2) herbs of the Natal-Drakensberg plus three species that further colonised steppes in north and eastern Africa. The highest diversity of Monsonia is found in the Namib-Karoo coastal belt, within a mosaic-like habitat structure. Diversification was likely driven by biome shifts and key innovations such as water-storing succulent stems and anemochorous fruits. In contrast, and unlike other arid-adapted taxa, all species of Monsonia share a C metabolism.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170903
[Lr] Last revision date:170903
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-09834-6

  7 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28610300
[Au] Autor:Stonis JR; Remeikis A; Diskus A; Megoran N
[Ad] Address:Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences and Baltic-American Biotaxonomy Institute, Studentu St. 39, Vilnius LT-08106, Lithuania.. stonis@leu.lt.
[Ti] Title:New species of leaf-mining Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera) from the Neotropical and Ando-Patagonian regions, with new data on host plants.
[So] Source:Zootaxa;4272(1):1-39, 2017 05 26.
[Is] ISSN:1175-5334
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The paper treats fifteen species of leaf-mining pygmy moths (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae) discovered in the Neotropics (British Virgin Islands, Belize, Costa Rica, Venezuela, and Ecuador), and Ando-Patagonian region (Argentina and Chile). Except for two species, all belong to Stigmella Schrank. Twelve species are new, and are named and described in the current paper: Stigmella apicibrunella Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. decora Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. unicaudata Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. sanmartini Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. patula Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. torosa Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. monstrata Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. huahumi Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. venezuelica Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; S. virginica Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov.; Fomoria miranda Diskus & Stonis, sp. nov.; and Hesperolyra robinsoni Stonis, sp. n. Newly discovered variation of male genitalia of the Andean Stigmella rudis Puplesis & Robinson, 2000 is briefly discussed, and the formerly poorly understood Stigmella hylomaga (Meyrick, 1931) is redescribed and documented with photographs for the first time. We also present more photographs and add some addtional information on Stigmella gallicola van Nieukerken & Nishida, a recently described gall-maker from Costa Rica.The paper also provides new host-plant data: some of the described (or redescribed) species are reported for the first time as leaf-miners on plants belonging to Euphorbiaceae (Acalypha padifolia Kunth), Salicaceae (Azara microphylla Hook. f.), Fabaceae (Inga spectabilis (Vahl) Willd. or I. edulis Mart.), Rhamnaceae (Colletia spinosissima J. F. Gmel.), Geraniaceae or Vivianiaceae (Rhynchotheca spinosa Ruiz & Pav.), and Asteraceae (Mutisia decurrens Cav.). All species treated in the paper are illustrated with photographs of the adults and genitalia, a distribution map, and also photographs of the leaf-mines and host plants when available.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lepidoptera
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Argentina
Belize
Chile
Costa Rica
Ecuador
Male
Plants
Venezuela
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170809
[Lr] Last revision date:170809
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170615
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11646/zootaxa.4272.1.1

  8 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28407721
[Au] Autor:Seker Karatoprak G; Göger F; Yerer MB; Kosar M
[Ad] Address:a Department of Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy , Erciyes University , Kayseri , Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Chemical composition and biological investigation of Pelargonium endlicherianum root extracts.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;55(1):1608-1618, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Pelargonium endlicherianum Fenzl. (Geraniaceae) roots and flowers are traditionally used in Turkey as a decoction treatment against intestinal parasites. Neither the chemical composition nor the potential bioactivity of the plant roots has been studied before. OBJECTIVES: The phenolic content and effects of P. endlicherianum root extracts on antioxidant enzyme levels on A549 cells were studied for the first time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The chemical composition was analyzed via spectrophotometric and chromatographic (HPLC MS/MS and HPLC) techniques. The antioxidant activity was determined at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 2 mg/mL using DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, ß-carotene-linoleic acid co-oxidation assay, protection of 2-deoxyribose and bovine brain-derived phospholipids against a hydroxyl radical-mediated degradation assay. Glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were also studied as well as the effects of the extracts on nitric oxide levels on IL-1ß stimulated A549 cells. RESULTS: The key parameters for the most active ethyl acetate extract included the following: DPPH IC : 0.23 mg/mL, TEAC/ABTS: 2.17 mmol/L Trolox, reduction: 0.41 mmol/g AsscE, and protection of lipid peroxidation IC : 0.05 mg/mL. Furthermore, the ethyl acetate extract increased the SOD level significantly compared to control group (4.48 U/mL) at concentrations of 100 and 200 µg/mL SOD, 5.50 and 5.67 U/mL, respectively. Apocynin was identified as the major component, and the ethyl acetate fraction was found to be rich in phenolic compounds. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Pelargonium endlicherianum root extracts displayed antioxidant activity and increased the antioxidant enzyme levels in IL-1ß stimulated A549 cells, while decreasing the NO levels.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antioxidants/pharmacology
Pelargonium/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: A549 Cells
Animals
Antioxidants/administration & dosage
Antioxidants/isolation & purification
Brain/drug effects
Brain/metabolism
Cattle
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Glutathione Peroxidase/metabolism
Humans
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Nitric Oxide/metabolism
Phospholipids/metabolism
Plant Extracts/administration & dosage
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Roots
Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Turkey
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Phospholipids); 0 (Plant Extracts); 31C4KY9ESH (Nitric Oxide); EC 1.11.1.9 (Glutathione Peroxidase); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171004
[Lr] Last revision date:171004
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170415
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13880209.2017.1314511

  9 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28400415
[Au] Autor:Ruhlman TA; Zhang J; Blazier JC; Sabir JSM; Jansen RK
[Ad] Address:Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 USA truhlman@austin.utexas.edu.
[Ti] Title:Recombination-dependent replication and gene conversion homogenize repeat sequences and diversify plastid genome structure.
[So] Source:Am J Bot;104(4):559-572, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PREMISE OF THE STUDY: There is a misinterpretation in the literature regarding the variable orientation of the small single copy region of plastid genomes (plastomes). The common phenomenon of small and large single copy inversion, hypothesized to occur through intramolecular recombination between inverted repeats (IR) in a circular, single unit-genome, in fact, more likely occurs through recombination-dependent replication (RDR) of linear plastome templates. If RDR can be primed through both intra- and intermolecular recombination, then this mechanism could not only create inversion isomers of so-called single copy regions, but also an array of alternative sequence arrangements. METHODS: We used Illumina paired-end and PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequences to characterize repeat structure in the plastome of (Geraniaceae). We used OrgConv and inspected nucleotide alignments to infer ancestral nucleotides and identify gene conversion among repeats and mapped long (>1 kb) SMRT reads against the unit-genome assembly to identify alternative sequence arrangements. RESULTS: Although lacks the canonical IR, we found that large repeats (>1 kilobase; kb) represent ∼22% of the plastome nucleotide content. Among the largest repeats (>2 kb), we identified GC-biased gene conversion and mapping filtered, long SMRT reads to the unit-genome assembly revealed alternative, substoichiometric sequence arrangements. CONCLUSION: We offer a model based on RDR and gene conversion between long repeated sequences in the plastome and provide support that both intra-and intermolecular recombination between large repeats, particularly in repeat-rich plastomes, varies unit-genome structure while homogenizing the nucleotide sequence of repeats.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gene Conversion/genetics
Genome, Plastid/genetics
Recombination, Genetic/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: DNA Replication/genetics
Genome, Plant/genetics
Geraniaceae/genetics
Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics
Sequence Alignment
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170822
[Lr] Last revision date:170822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3732/ajb.1600453

  10 / 183 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28398302
[Au] Autor:Aedo C; Pando F
[Ad] Address:Real Jardín Botánico-CSIC, 28014 Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:A distribution and taxonomic reference dataset of Geranium in the New World.
[So] Source:Sci Data;4:170049, 2017 04 11.
[Is] ISSN:2052-4463
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Geranium L. is a genus of over 350 species distributed throughout most of the world, except in lowland tropical areas. It is the largest genus of the Geraniaceae and is represented in the New World by 137 species. This dataset includes 8,937 records that covers the genus Geranium the New World, providing an updated, taxonomically consistent and a sound geographical distribution of the 137 species of Geranium in America. Specimens from 128 herbaria were reviewed. These were supplemented by others collected during nine field trips, which allowed better knowledge of the variability of characters within populations, and refining species distribution ranges. Each record represents a specimen that has been reviewed and in some cases collected by C. Aedo. Accepted scientific name, locality details, distribution status (introduced, native, naturalized, uncertain), geographic coordinates are given for 8,538 (95%) records, and habitat information for 3,952 (44%). All data have been released under a CC-BY license in a standardized format, which enables easy integration with other data, for example through GBIF.org.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/sdata.2017.49


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