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[PMID]: 29408884
[Au] Autor:García-Villaescusa A; Morales-Tatay JM; Monleón-Salvadó D; González-Darder JM; Bellot-Arcis C; Montiel-Company JM; Almerich-Silla JM
[Ad] Address:Departament d'Estomatologia, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Using NMR in saliva to identify possible biomarkers of glioblastoma and chronic periodontitis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0188710, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nowadays there is increasing interest in identifying-and using-metabolites that can be employed as biomarkers for diagnosing, treating and monitoring diseases. Saliva and NMR have been widely used for this purpose as they are fast and inexpensive methods. This case-control study aimed to find biomarkers that could be related to glioblastoma (GBL) and periodontal disease (PD) and studied a possible association between GBL and periodontal status. The participants numbered 130, of whom 10 were diagnosed with GBL and were assigned to the cases group, while the remaining 120 did not present any pathology and were assigned to the control group. On one hand, significantly increased (p < 0.05) metabolites were found in GBL group: leucine, valine, isoleucine, propionate, alanine, acetate, ethanolamine and sucrose. Moreover, a good tendency to separation between the two groups was observed on the scatterplot of the NMR. On the other hand, the distribution of the groups attending to the periodontal status was very similar and we didn´t find any association between GBL and periodontal status (Chi-Square 0.1968, p = 0.91). Subsequently, the sample as a whole (130 individuals) was divided into three groups by periodontal status in order to identify biomarkers for PD. Group 1 was composed of periodontally healthy individuals, group 2 had gingivitis or early periodontitis and group 3 had moderate to advanced periodontitis. On comparing periodontal status, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in certain metabolites was observed. These findings along with previous reports suggest that these could be used as biomarkers of a PD: caproate, isocaproate+butyrate, isovalerate, isopropanol+methanol, 4 aminobutyrate, choline, sucrose, sucrose-glucose-lysine, lactate-proline, lactate and proline. The scatter plot showed a good tendency to wards separation between group 1 and 3.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/metabolism
Chronic Periodontitis/metabolism
Glioblastoma/metabolism
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/methods
Saliva/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188710

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[PMID]: 29520910
[Au] Autor:Kotsakis GA; Lian Q; Ioannou AL; Michalowicz BS; John M; Chu H
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
[Ti] Title:A network meta-analysis of interproximal oral hygiene methods in the reduction of clinical indices of inflammation.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A wide selection of Interdental Oral Hygiene (IOH) aids is available to consumers. Recommendations for selection are, however, limited by the lack of direct comparisons in available studies. We aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of IOH aids using Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis (BNMA). METHODS: Two independent reviewers performed a systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials assessing IOH aids, based on a focused question. Gingival inflammation (Gingival Index (GI), Bleeding-on-probing (BOP)) was the primary outcome and plaque and probing depth were secondary outcomes A random-effects arm-based BNMA model was run for each outcome; posterior medians and 95% credible-intervals (CIs) summarized marginal distributions of parameters. RESULTS: A two-phase selection process identified 22 trials assessing 10 IOH aids as brushing adjuncts. Interdental brushes (IB) yielded the largest reduction in GI (0.23 [95% CI: 0.09, 0.37]) as toothbrushing adjuncts, followed by water-jet (WJ) (0.19 [95% CI: 0.14, 0.24]). Rankings based on posterior probabilities revealed that IB and WJ had the highest probability of being "best" (64.7% and 27.4%, respectively) for GI reduction, while the probability for toothpick and floss being the "best" IOH aids was near zero. Notably, except for toothpicks, all IOH aids were better at reducing GI as compared to control. CONCLUSIONS: BNMA enabled us to quantitatively evaluate IOH aids and provide a global ranking of their efficacy. Interdental brushes and water-jets ranked high for reducing gingival bleeding, while toothpicks and floss ranked last. The patient-perceived benefit of IOH aids is not clear because gingival inflammation measures are physical indicators of periodontal health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0368

  3 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520843
[Au] Autor:Bletsa A; Abdalla H; Løes S; Berggreen E
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Lymphatic growth factors are expressed in human gingiva and upregulated in gingival fibroblasts after stimulation.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The lymphatic growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and -D are important for maintenance and growth of lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis), but their localization in human gingiva is unknown. This study investigated the expression of VEGF-C and -D in human gingiva and isolated human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). In addition, the localization of their main receptor VEGFR-3 was explored. METHODS: Non-inflamed gingiva from 6 donors was used for immunohistochemistry or isolation of HGFs. HGFs were stimulated with either E.coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) complex for 1, 6 and 24 hours. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) was used to quantify the relative changes in gene expression of VEGF-A, -C and -D and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of protein levels. RESULTS: VEGF-C, -D and VEGFR-3 were seen in keratinocytes, blood vessels and in scattered single cells in gingiva. VEGFR-3 was also found in lymphatic vessels and VEGF-C in cells with fibroblastic appearance. Gene analysis showed no expression of VEGF-D in the HGFs, but constitutive expression of VEGF-C and -A. Stimulation of HGFs with LPS or IL-6/sIL-6R complex was followed by gene upregulation of VEGF-C and -A and increased protein levels in cell culture supernatant (p ≤ 0,05). CONCLUSIONS: The localization of VEGF-C, -D and VEGFR-3 expression imply that signaling via VEGFR-3 is linked to vascular homeostasis and keratinocyte function under normal conditions in gingiva. Inflammatory stimulation of HGFs upregulates VEGF-C and- A expression and may contribute to angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0400

  4 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520827
[Au] Autor:Beck JD; Moss KL; Morelli T; Offenbacher S
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
[Ti] Title:In search of appropriate measures of periodontal status: The Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) system.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):166-175, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This paper focuses on Periodontal Profile Class (PPC), a component of the Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) System that may be more representative of the periodontitis phenotype than current case definitions of periodontitis. Data illustrate the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other commonly used periodontal classification indices. METHODS: Latent Class Analysis (LCA) identified discrete classes of individuals grouped by tooth-level clinical parameters. The analysis defined seven distinct periodontal profile classes (PPC A through G) and seven distinct tooth profile classes (TPC A through G). This LCA classification was an entirely data-derived agnostic process without any preconceived presumptions of what constituted disease. RESULTS: Comparing the PPC with the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology (CDC/AAP) and European indices, the PPC is unique in that it contains four disease classes not traditionally used. Less than half of individuals classified as Healthy by both the CDC/AAP and European indices were Healthy using the PPC. About 25% of those classified as Severe by CDC/AAP and European indices were PPC-Severe. The remainder spread out over the High Gingival Index, Posterior Disease, Tooth Loss, and Severe Tooth Loss phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The PPC classification provides a significant departure from the traditional clinical case status indices that have been used, but has resulted in clinical phenotypes that are quite familiar to most clinicians who take notice of the distribution of missing teeth, areas of recession, diminished periodontal support, and other aspects of the dentition while conducting a periodontal examination. The mutually exclusive categories provided by the PPC system provide periodontal clinical summaries that can be an important component of precision dentistry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0424

  5 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520823
[Au] Autor:Beck JD; Moss KL; Morelli T; Offenbacher S
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal profile class is associated with prevalent diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and systemic markers of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):157-165, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This paper focuses on the Periodontal Profile Class (PPC) System that may be more informative and representative of periodontitis phenotypes than current case definitions of periodontitis. This study illustrates the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other periodontal indices for studying associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions. METHODS: We computed odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to compare associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions using our new PPC and two traditional indices. We used the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to determine the fit of the model and the magnitude of the contribution attributable to periodontal disease beyond traditional risk factors. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1996-1998) results were compared with results from the combined National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2014 datasets. RESULTS: In the ARIC Study, high gingival inflammation, tooth loss, severe tooth loss, and severe disease PPC components were significantly associated with diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin (IL)-6, while only severe disease was associated with stroke. Severe disease was associated with CHD using the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology index, and the European Periodontal index was associated with CHD and IL-6. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of the PPC to traditional variables associated with prevalent diabetes, stroke, CHD, and systemic measures of inflammation resulted in very strong improvement of the overall models, while the traditional indices were less likely to be associated and, if present, the associations were weaker. The PPC system provides specific insight into the individuals and periodontal characteristics of the phenotype that are associated with systemic conditions that may be useful in designing treatment interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0426

  6 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520795
[Au] Autor:Andriankaja OM; Muñoz-Torres FJ; Vivaldi-Oliver J; Leroux BG; Campos M; Joshipura K; Pérez CM
[Ad] Address:University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, School of Dental Medicine, Center for Clinical Research and Health Promotion, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
[Ti] Title:Insulin resistance predicts the risk of gingival/periodontal inflammation.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Evaluate whether insulin resistance (IR) predicts the risk of oral inflammation, assessed as the number of sites with bleeding on probing (BOP) and number of teeth with probing pocket depths (PPD) ≥ 4 mm and BOP. METHODS: Data on 870 overweight/obese diabetes free adults, aged 40-65 years from the San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study over a three-year period, was analyzed. Baseline IR, assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) index, was divided into tertiles. BOP was assessed at buccal and lingual sites, and PPD at six sites per tooth. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the risk ratios (RRs) for oral inflammation adjusted for baseline age, gender, smoking status, alcohol intake, education, physical activity, waist circumference, mean plaque index, and baseline number of sites with BOP, or number of teeth with PPD≥4 mm and BOP. The potential impact of tertiles of serum TNF-α and adiponectin on the IR-oral inflammation association was also assessed in a subsample of 597 participants. RESULTS: Participants in the highest HOMA-IR tertile at baseline, had significantly higher numbers of sites with BOP [RR = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.36] and number of teeth with PPD≥4 mm and BOP (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.09 - 1.78) at follow-up, compared with individuals in the lower two HOMA-IR tertiles. Neither TNF-α nor adiponectin confounded the associations. CONCLUSION: IR significantly predicts gingival/periodontal inflammation in this population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0384

  7 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29335336
[Au] Autor:Sen S; Giamberardino LD; Moss K; Morelli T; Rosamond WD; Gottesman RF; Beck J; Offenbacher S
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neurology, University of South Carolina, School of Medicine, Columbia (S.S., L.D.G.); Department of Periodontology (K.M., T.M., J.B., S.O.) and Department of Epidemiology, Gilling's School of Public Health (W.D.R.), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Department of
[Ti] Title:Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(2):355-362, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. METHODS: In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). RESULTS: In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ trend <0.0001); the incidence rate for ischemic stroke/1000-person years was 1.29 for PPC-A (health), 2.82 for PPC-B, 4.80 for PPC-C, 3.81 for PPC-D, 3.50 for PPC-E, 4.78 for PPC-F, and 5.03 for PPC-G (severe periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). CONCLUSIONS: We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.018990

  8 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29267671
[Au] Autor:Lutfioglu M; Aydogdu A; Atabay VE; Sakallioglu EE; Avci B
[Ad] Address:Ondokuz Mayis University Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Periodontology, Samsun, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Gingival crevicular fluid oxidative stress level in patients with periodontal disease and hyperlipidemia.
[So] Source:Braz Oral Res;31:e110, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1807-3107
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aimed to assess the impact of hyperlipidemia on healthy and diseased periodontal tissue by evaluating oxidative stress biomarkers in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Clinical periodontal parameters and blood serum lipid, GCF malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC), and total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) levels were evaluated in six age and sex-matched groups (n = 15 each) of normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic individuals as follows: normolipidemic + periodontally healthy (H), normolipidemic + gingivitis (G), normolipidemic + chronic periodontitis (CP), hyperlipidemic + periodontally healthy (HH), hyperlipidemic + gingivitis (HG), and hyperlipidemic + CP (HCP). GCF MDA, and PC levels varied among groups, with patients with periodontitis having the highest MDA and PC levels [CP > G > H (p < 0.01) and HCP > HG > HH (p < 0.01)] and the lowest TAOC levels [CP < G < H (p < 0.01) and HCP < HG < HH (p < 0.01)]. Furthermore, paired comparisons showed MDA and PC levels to be higher and TAOC levels to be lower in HCP compared with NCP (p < 0.01). In patients with hyperlipidemia, GCF, MDA, and PC levels positively correlated with clinical assessments and serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels and negatively correlated with serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels, whereas GCF TAOC levels negatively correlated with clinical assessments and serum TG, TC, and LDL levels, but positively correlated with serum HDL levels (p < 0.01). In normolipidemic patients, GCF, MDA, and PC levels positively correlated with clinical assessments and serum TG levels and negatively correlated with serum HDL levels, whereas GCF TAOC levels negatively correlated with clinical assessments and serum TG levels and positively correlated with serum HDL levels (p < 0.01). In conclusion, abnormal serum lipid subfractions could be considered a risk factor for enhancing oxidative stress in GCF in the presence of periodontal disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chronic Periodontitis/blood
Gingival Crevicular Fluid/metabolism
Gingivitis/blood
Hyperlipidemias/blood
Oxidative Stress/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol/blood
Chronic Periodontitis/etiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Gingivitis/etiology
Humans
Hyperlipidemias/complications
Male
Malondialdehyde/blood
Middle Aged
Protein Carbonylation/physiology
Reference Values
Statistics, Nonparametric
Triglycerides/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Triglycerides); 4Y8F71G49Q (Malondialdehyde); 97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29203739
[Au] Autor:Berezniakova AI; Cheremisina VF
[Ad] Address:National Pharmaceutical University, Kharkov, Ukraine.
[Ti] Title:4 and 6 interleukin's action in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, gingivitis and dental alveolitis.
[So] Source:Wiad Lek;70(5):910-912, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0043-5147
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The paper presents the results of studying the role of interleukins 4 and 6 in the pathogenesis of periodontal tissue diseases, specifically, in periodontitis, gingivitis and alveolitis. THE AIM: To study the nature of participation of IL-4 and IL-6 in the mechanisms of development of periodontitis, gingivitis and alveolitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Studies were carried out on 80 nonlinear male rats with a body weight of 200.0 to 220.0 g divided into four groups of 20 animals each. The serum level of cytokines was determined by an enzyme immunoassay on the Multiscane Biotech analyzer using test systems manufactured by Caltag laboratories (USA). Statistical processing of the obtained digital results was processed with the help of the program "Statistica 8.0". Indicators of the reliability of changes between the control and intact groups also used the Student's test and the Excel program. The confidence level was taken at p <0.05. RESULTS: As a result of our experiments, noticeable changes in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 were observed in rats with experimental periodontitis. The level of IL-4 cytokine in rats with alveolitis did not differ from control. The level of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 from all groups of animals with periodontal disease differed from control only in rats with gingivitis, where it decreased by 74% and its level became less with alveolitis and periodontitis, since in these diseases the level of IL-6 was practically the same from the control (p <0,05). We also succeeded in revealing that at a low level of profibrogenic IL-6, there is not enough stimulation of collagen synthesis in the periodontal bone tissue. The increased level of IL-4 in a group of animals with gingivitis, on the contrary, indicates the realization of a pathological reaction of the organism. CONCLUSIONS: The change in the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins, especially with gingivitis, indicates a decrease in the body's adaptive reserves and may affect the further dynamics of the inflammatory process in the periodontal tissues.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alveolar Process/immunology
Gingivitis/immunology
Interleukin-4/blood
Interleukin-6/blood
Periodontal Diseases/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Rats
Rats, Wistar
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Interleukin-6); 207137-56-2 (Interleukin-4)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 12184 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516514
[Au] Autor:Herrero ER; Boon N; Bernaerts K; Slomka V; Verspecht T; Quirynen M; Teughels W
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Clinical concentrations of peroxidases cause dysbiosis in in vitro oral biofilms.
[So] Source:J Periodontal Res;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0765
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the initiation of dysbiosis in oral biofilms, a topic of prime importance for understanding the etiology of, and preventing, periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of crevicular and salivary peroxidase and catalase on dysbiosis in multispecies biofilms in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The spotting technique was used to identify the effect of different concentrations of myeloperoxidase, lactoperoxidase, erythrocyte catalase, and horseradish peroxidase in salivary and crevicular fluid on the inhibitory effect of commensals on pathobiont growth. Vitality-quantitative real-time PCR was performed to quantify the dysbiotic effect of the peroxidases (adjusted to concentrations found in periodontal health, gingivitis, and periodontitis) on multispecies microbial communities. RESULTS: Agar plate and multispecies ecology experiments showed that production of hydrogen peroxide (H O ) by commensal bacteria decreases pathobiont growth and colonization. Peroxidases at concentrations found in crevicular fluid and saliva neutralized this inhibitory effect. In multispecies communities, myeloperoxidase, at the crevicular fluid concentrations found in periodontitis, resulted in a 1-3 Log increase in pathobionts when compared with the crevicular fluid concentrations found in periodontal health. The effect of salivary lactoperoxidase and salivary myeloperoxidase concentrations was, in general, similar to the effect of crevicular myeloperoxidase concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Commensal species suppress pathobionts by producing H O . Catalase and peroxidases, at clinically relevant concentrations, can neutralize this effect and thereby can contribute to dysbiosis by allowing the outgrowth of pathobionts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jre.12534


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