Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29231165
[Au] Autor:Cuny C; Vaerst B; Gabrielpillai J; Tahtali A; Balster S; Lissner R; Woodcock BG
[Ti] Title:Polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3 and vitamin B12 in the treatment of Sjogren's syndrome in a vegetarian with stomatitis, glossodynia, xerostomia, and elevated antinuclear antibodies: Case report
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[So] Source:Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther;56(1):24-27, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0946-1965
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sjogren's syndrome, involving sicca symptoms with xerostomia, stomatitis, and considerable pain is a difficult-to-treat autoimmune disease where the treatment options are limited and, as in the case of methotrexate, have a low therapeutic index. CASE REPORT: This case report concerns a male patient, aged 75 years and vegetarian, with Sjogren's syndrome subsequently confirmed by salivary gland biopsy. Serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were elevated (1 : 320). Low serum vitamin B12 and iron levels could be improved after 20 days using vitamin B12 and iron oral supplements. Despite symptomatic treatment, xerostomia, glossitis, and glossodynia were still present, at times marked, after 12 months when the ANA titer was unchanged. Following treatment with an anti-inflammatory polyvalent immunoglobulin formulation (Lactobin®N, 7 g daily), a bovine colostrum concentrate given orally in combination with oral vitamin D3 (2,000 IU daily), sicca symptoms and xerostomia progressively decreased and at day 750 were confined to occasional and minor glossitis of the upper lip. CONCLUSION: This case report demonstrates the satisfactory control of Sjogren's syndrome using oral polyvalent immunoglobulins with vitamin D3. In contrast to treatment options involving antimalarial drugs and methotrexate, there are no safety issues in patients tolerant to milk products.
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[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cholecalciferol/administration & dosage
Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use
Sjogren´s Syndrome/drug therapy
Stomatitis/drug therapy
Vitamin B 12/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Antibodies, Antinuclear/blood
Humans
Male
Sjogren's Syndrome/immunology
Stomatitis/immunology
Vegetarians
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Antinuclear); 0 (Immunoglobulins); 1C6V77QF41 (Cholecalciferol); P6YC3EG204 (Vitamin B 12)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5414/CP203143

  2 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29202671
[Au] Autor:Caffarena RD; Rabaza A; Casaux L; Rioseco MM; Schild CO; Monesiglio C; Fraga M; Giannitti F; Riet-Correa F
[Ad] Address:Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria, La Estanzuela, Colonia, Uruguay (Caffarena, Rabaza, Casaux, Macías Rioseco, Schild, Monesiglio, Fraga, Giannitti, Riet-Correa).
[Ti] Title:Natural lymphatic ("atypical") actinobacillosis in cattle caused by Actinobacillus lignieresii.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;30(2):218-225, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bovine actinobacillosis is typically characterized by pyogranulomatous glossitis (wooden tongue). The involvement of other tissues, generally the skin or lymph nodes, has been regarded as atypical or cutaneous. We describe herein 2 outbreaks of actinobacillosis affecting primarily the lymph nodes of the head and neck. The disease affected 40 of 540 lactating cows in a dairy herd, and 5 of 335 two-y-old steers in a beef herd. Multiple or single, occasionally ulcerated nodules were observed in the region of the mandible, neck, and shoulder, including the parotid, submandibular, retropharyngeal, and prescapular lymph nodes. The histologic lesions were multifocal pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis, dermatitis, and cellulitis with Splendore-Hoeppli material. One steer had an exophytic pyogranuloma in the gingiva and another died because of ruminal tympany secondary to oropharyngeal and esophageal obstruction by a pyogranulomatous mass. Actinobacillus lignieresii was isolated from the lesions and identified by amplification, sequencing, and analysis of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA gene. Seven of 8 cows recovered after treatment with sodium iodide. Lymphatic actinobacillosis is a frequent disease in Uruguay, southern Brazil, and Argentina. Morbidity is 1-50%; mortality is <1%. A. lignieresii apparently penetrates the intact oral and pharyngeal mucosa, infecting primarily the regional lymph nodes. Later, lesions may extend to the subcutaneous tissue and the skin, causing ulceration. Affected cattle with draining pyogranulomas contaminate the environment, favoring disease transmission, and should be treated with sodium iodide or antibiotics and isolated from the herd in order to control the disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638717742621

  3 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394988
[Au] Autor:Khan S; Mujahid TA; Ishaq M; Bukhari SAR; Saeed I
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Pak Field Hospital Darfur, Sudan.
[Ti] Title:Benign Migratory Glossitis.
[So] Source:J Coll Physicians Surg Pak;28(2):175-176, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1681-7168
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.29271/jcpsp.2018.02.175

  4 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29364438
[Au] Autor:Jorge MA; Gonzaga HFS; Tomimori J; Picciani BLS; Barbosa CA
[Ad] Address:Research Center, Centro de Ensino Superior de Dracena (CESD) - Dracena, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and heritability of psoriasis and benign migratory glossitis in one Brazilian population.
[So] Source:An Bras Dermatol;92(6):816-819, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1806-4841
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: An oral condition associated to psoriasis is benign migratory glossitis. The review of the literature does not show any publication about heritability in both soriasis and benign migratory glossitis and prevalence of psoriasis in the Brazilian population. OBJECTIVE: This research was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of psoriasis and benign migratory glossitis in the Brazilian population from a Brazilian sample, as well as the heritability in these conditions. METHODS: Six thousand patients were studied from the records of the outpatient dermatology department. The sample had 129 patients with cutaneous psoriasis, 399 with benign migratory glossitis without psoriasis and a control group with 5,472 patients. After data collection, the statistical analysis was made using Woolf, Chi-square and Falconer tests. RESULTS: The prevalence of psoriasis was 2.15% and the benign migratory glossitis was 7.0%. The prevalence of benign migratory glossitis in the psoriasis group was high (16.3%), and that was statistically significant. Family history in the psoriasis group was 38% for the condition itself and 2,75% for benign migratory glossitis and in the benign migratory glossitis group was 17.54% for the condition itself and 1.5% for psoriasis. The study of heritability was 38.8% for psoriasis and 36.6% for benign migratory glossitis, both with medium heritability. STUDY LIMITATIONS: This study was only in the state of São Paulo. CONCLUSION: This is the first publication that quantifies how much of these conditions have a genetic background and how important the environmental factors are in triggering them.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29337622
[Au] Autor:Catania S; Carnaccini S; Mainenti M; Moronato ML; Gobbo F; Calogero T
[Ad] Address:A Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale di Padova, Viale dell'Università 10, Legnaro, PD, 35020, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Isolation of Avipoxvirus from Tongue of Canaries ( Serinus canaria) Show Severe Localized Proliferative Glossitis.
[So] Source:Avian Dis;61(4):531-535, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1938-4351
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Poxvirus was the causative agent of two unusual outbreaks of proliferative glossitis in canary ( Serinus canaria forma domestica) breeders in the Northern Italy. A total of 45, 7-9-mo-old canaries were submitted in fair postmortem conditions to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie at the beginning of November 2005 for diagnostic investigation. Birds belonged to two unrelated and geographically distant aviaries in northern Italy, herein identified as Aviary A and Aviary B. The two breeder flocks had both attended the same bird exposition held at the beginning of October and started experiencing an onset of high mortality 3 wk after the show. Twelve red factor-melanin canaries from Aviary A (Mantua) and 33 dominant white and recessive white canaries from Aviary B (Vicenza) were submitted for laboratory investigations. Clinical signs were unspecific and consisted of depression, ruffling of the feathers, epistaxis, and anorexia due to decreased feed and water intake. Postmortem findings revealed a severe increase in volume, thickening, and hardening of the tongue, which had turned pinkish to dark brown. No apparent gross lesions were noticed in integumentary, respiratory, and digestive systems or other internal organs. Histopathologic evaluation of the tongue revealed severe proliferation of the stratified squamous epithelium containing numerous large eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (Bollinger bodies) displacing the nuclei of the cells peripherally. Severe ulceration of the surface epithelium, fibrinoheterophilic plaque formation, and moderate basal lymphoplasmacytic infiltrations were also associated with the proliferative lesion. Poxvirus was successfully isolated from the lesions in tissue cultures but not in specific-pathogen-free chicken embryonated eggs. Typical large, brick-shaped viral particles of 300-450 nm were also observed in affected tongues by transmission electron microscopy. This is the first report of multiple outbreaks of "poxvirus glossitis" in canaries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1637/11713-071417-Case.1

  6 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29246167
[Au] Autor:Nakamura S; Okamoto MR; Yamamoto K; Tsurumoto A; Yoshino Y; Iwabuchi H; Saito I; Maeda N; Nakagawa Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Pathophysiology., Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, Tsurumi University Dental Hospital, 2-1-3 Tsurumi, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, 230-8501, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The Candida species that are important for the development of atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;17(1):153, 2017 Dec 16.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to clarify the species of Candida that are important for the development of atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients. METHODS: A total of 231 patients with subjective dry mouth were enrolled in the present study. Logistic regression analysis was performed to clarify the contribution of each Candida species and other variables to the development of atrophic glossitis. The dependent variable was the absence/presence of atrophic glossitis. The Candida colony-forming units (CFU) of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei, as well as age, gender, resting (RSFR) and stimulated (SSFR) whole salivary flow rate, and denture-wearing status, were treated as explanatory variables. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that two factors were closely associated with the presence of atrophic glossitis: an increase in C. albicans CFU and a decrease in the SSFR. CONCLUSIONS: C. albicans, but not non-albicans Candida, was associated with atrophic glossitis in xerostomia patients who had no systemic predisposing factors, indicating that C. albicans remains a treatment target for Candida-related atrophic glossitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-017-0449-3

  7 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29110980
[Au] Autor:Stoopler ET; France K; Ojeda D; Sollecito TP
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:Benign Migratory Glossitis.
[So] Source:J Emerg Med;, 2017 Oct 27.
[Is] ISSN:0736-4679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29099543
[Au] Autor:Bjelakovic G; Nikolova D; Bjelakovic M; Gluud C
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Nis, Zorana Djindjica 81, Nis, Serbia, 18000.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin D supplementation for chronic liver diseases in adults.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;11:CD011564, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is often reported in people with chronic liver diseases. Therefore, improving vitamin D status could have a beneficial effect on people with chronic liver diseases. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation in people with chronic liver diseases. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. We also searched databases of ongoing trials and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We scanned bibliographies of relevant publications and asked experts and pharmaceutical companies for additional trials. All searches were up to January 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α-hydroxyvitamin D (alfacalcidol), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol), or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol)). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We contacted authors of the trials to ask for missing information. We conducted random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratios (RRs), and for continuous outcomes, we calculated mean differences (MD), both with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and Trial Sequential Analyses-adjusted CIs. We calculated Peto odds ratio (OR) for rare events. We considered risk of bias in domains to assess the risk of systematic errors. We conducted Trial Sequential Analyses to control the risk of random errors. We assessed the quality of the evidence with GRADE. MAIN RESULTS: We included 15 randomised clinical trials with 1034 participants randomised. All trials had a parallel group design. Nine trials were conducted in high-income countries and six trials in middle-income countries. All trials were at high risk of bias. Six trials included participants with chronic hepatitis C, four trials included participants with liver cirrhosis, four trials included participants with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and one trial included liver transplant recipients. All included trials reported the baseline vitamin D status of participants. Participants in six trials had baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at or above vitamin D adequacy (20 ng/mL), while participants in the remaining nine trials were vitamin D insufficient (less than 20 ng/mL). All trials administered vitamin D orally. Mean duration of vitamin D supplementation was 0.5 years and follow-up was 0.6 years. Eleven trials (831 participants; 40% women; mean age 52 years) tested vitamin D , one trial (18 men; mean age 61 years) with three intervention groups tested vitamin D and 25-dihydroxyvitamin D in separate groups, and three trials (185 participants; 55% women; mean age 55 years) tested 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Seven trials used placebo, and eight trials used no intervention in the control group.The effect of vitamin D on all-cause mortality at the end of follow-up is uncertain because the results were imprecise (Peto OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.09 to 5.38; I = 32%; 15 trials; 1034 participants; very low quality evidence). Trial Sequential Analysis on all-cause mortality was performed based on a mortality rate in the control group of 10%, a relative risk reduction of 28% in the experimental intervention group, a type I error of 2.5%, and type II error of 10% (90% power). There was no diversity. The required information size was 6396 participants. The cumulative Z-curve did not cross the trial sequential monitoring boundary for benefit or harm after the 15th trial, and the Trial Sequential Analyses-adjusted CI was 0.00 to 2534.The effect of vitamin D on liver-related mortality (RR 1.62, 95% CI 0.08 to 34.66; 1 trial; 18 participants) and on serious adverse events such as hypercalcaemia (RR 5.00, 95% CI 0.25 to 100.8; 1 trial; 76 participants), myocardial infarction (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.08 to 6.81; 2 trials; 86 participants), and thyroiditis (RR 0.33 95% CI 0.01 to 7.91; 1 trial; 68 participants) is uncertain because the results were imprecise. The evidence on all these outcomes is of very low quality. The effect of vitamin D on non-serious adverse events such as glossitis (RR 3.70, 95% CI 0.16 to 87.6; 1 trial; 65 participants; very low quality of evidence) is uncertain because the result was imprecise.Due to few data, we did not conduct Trial Sequential Analysis on liver-related mortality, and serious and non-serious adverse events.We found no data on liver-related morbidity and health-related quality of life in the randomised trials included in this review. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We are uncertain as to whether vitamin D supplements in the form of vitamin D , vitamin D , 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, or 25-dihydroxyvitamin D have important effect on all-cause mortality, liver-related mortality, or on serious or non-serious adverse events because the results were imprecise. There is no evidence on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on liver-related morbidity and health-related quality of life. Our conclusions are based on few trials with an insufficient number of participants and on lack of data on clinically important outcomes. In addition, the analysed trials are at high risk of bias with significant intertrial heterogeneity. The overall quality of evidence is very low.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD011564.pub2

  9 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29099362
[Au] Autor:Gaddey HL
[Ti] Title:Oral manifestations of systemic disease.
[So] Source:Gen Dent;65(6):23-29, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0363-6771
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:On examination, the oral cavity may exhibit manifestations of underlying systemic disease and serve as an indicator of overall health. Systemic diseases with oral findings include autoimmune, hematologic, endocrine, and neoplastic processes. Autoimmune disease may manifest as oral ulcerations, changes in the salivary and parotid glands, and changes in the tongue. Patients with hematologic illnesses may present with gingival bleeding or tongue changes such as glossitis, depending on the etiology. Oral changes associated with endocrine illness are variable and depend on the underlying condition. Neoplastic changes include metastatic lesions to the bony and soft tissues of the oral cavity. Patients with chronic diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux and eating disorders may present with dental erosions that cause oral pain or halitosis. In the pediatric population, oral changes can be related to rare cancers, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, or infectious etiologies, such as Kawasaki disease. In both adults and pediatric patients, poor oral health has been linked to poorer health outcomes overall. Thorough history taking and physical examination by dentists may aid in determining the underlying etiology of oral changes and allow for earlier intervention by medical colleagues.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 1073 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29072641
[Au] Autor:Kolomiets SV; Udaltsova KA; Shinkevich VI
[Ad] Address:Ukrainian Medical Dental Academy, Poltava, Ukraine.
[Ti] Title:Debiut bolezni Krona v polosti rta. Klinicheskii sluchai. [Manifestation of Crohn's disease in the oral cavity: clinical case].
[So] Source:Stomatologiia (Mosk);96(5):28-30, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0039-1735
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The article contains the review of possible oral manifestations of Crohn's disease and clinical case presentation of purulent alveolitis resistant to conventional local treatment, geographical glossitis and xerostomia in 42 y.o. female with the history of periodical digestive disorders, diagnosed with Crohn's disease. The diagnosis was based on abovementioned oral manifestations.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17116/stomat201796528-30


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