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[PMID]: 29501827
[Au] Autor:Luz VB; Gadelha ICN; Cordeiro LAV; Melo MM; Soto-Blanco B
[Ad] Address:Centro Universitário Cesmac, Rodovia Divaldo Suruagy s/n, quadra 4 lote 4, Marechal Deodoro, AL, 57160-000, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:In vitro study of gossypol's ovarian toxicity to rodents and goats.
[So] Source:Toxicon;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gossypol interferes with reproduction, causing damage to sperm, disrupting the estrous cycle and resulting in embryonic lethality. In females, gossypol administration promotes degeneration of ovarian follicles, but it is unknown whether this effect is direct or indirect. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine whether gossypol interferes with folliculogenesis in vitro in rats, mice and goats. Ovaries from rats and mice and fragments of goat ovaries were grown in cell culture for 24 h or 7 days. Four groups were tested: 0 (control), 5, 10 and 20 µg gossypol/ml. After incubation, the ovaries were fixed and processed for histological analysis. Follicles were classified according to their stage of development as either viable or atretic. It was found that the ovaries of rats, mice and goats cultured with gossypol showed an increase in the proportion of atretic follicles and a consequent reduction in the proportion of viable follicles at all stages of follicular development. Compared to the control group, the viability of all ovarian follicles in the rat, mouse and goat groups was reduced after cultivation for 24 h by 56.9%, 56.5% and 68.0%, respectively, with the highest concentration of gossypol (20 µg/mL), and after seven days, the respective reductions were 65.4%, 65.3% and 88.2%. Thus, it is possible that gossypol may directly affect follicular maturation, and consequently female fertility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29431319
[Au] Autor:Iskandarov TI; Slavinskaya NV; Iskandarova GT
[Ti] Title:[Working conditions and functional state of the organism of mechaniciandrivers under the defoliation of the cotton-plants].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(9):854-7, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:In the article there are presented results of the study of the impact of working of mechanicians-drivers performing cotton-plant defoliation with a new import-substituting low-toxic defoliant denoted as «Fandef-Alo¼ on a functional state of various systems of the organism. Working conditions and the character of labor processes under the execution of defoliation were revealed to give rise in adverse shifts of physiological responses of various systems of the organism in mechanician-drivers, and the noise and the overwork labor process elevate the probability for the risk of the occurrence of occupational diseases that is indicates to the need for measures for the making labor healthy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agriculture
Defoliants, Chemical
Gossypium
Occupational Diseases
Workplace/standards
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Agriculture/methods
Agriculture/standards
Automobile Driving
Defoliants, Chemical/adverse effects
Defoliants, Chemical/chemistry
Farmers/statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
Occupational Exposure/analysis
Occupational Exposure/prevention & control
Occupational Health/standards
Risk Assessment
Uzbekistan/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Defoliants, Chemical)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29427607
[Au] Autor:da Cunha Soares T; da Silva CRC; Chagas Carvalho JMF; Cavalcanti JJV; de Lima LM; de Albuquerque Melo Filho P; Severino LS; Dos Santos RC
[Ad] Address:Post-Graduation in Biotechnology, Renorbio/ Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Rua Manoel de Medeiros, s/n - Dois Irmãos, 52171-900, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Validating a probe from GhSERK1 gene for selection of cotton genotypes with somatic embryogenic capacity.
[So] Source:J Biotechnol;270:44-50, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4863
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Substantial progress is being reported in the techniques for plant transformation, but successful regeneration of some genotypes remains a challenging step in the attempts to transform some recalcitrant species. GhSERK1 gene is involved on embryo formation, and its overexpression enhances the embryogenic competence. In this study we validate a short GhSERK1 probe in order to identify embryogenic cotton genotypes using RT-qPCR and blotting assays. Cotton genotypes with contrasting somatic embryogenic capacity were tested using in vitro procedures. High expression of transcripts was found in embryogenic genotypes, and the results were confirmed by the RT-PCR-blotting using a non-radioactive probe. The regeneration ability was confirmed in embryogenic genotypes. We confirmed that GhSERK1 can be used as marker for estimating the somatic embryogenesis ability of cotton plants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517986
[Au] Autor:Li W; Ren Z; Wang Z; Sun K; Pei X; Liu Y; He K; Zhang F; Song C; Zhou X; Zhang W; Ma X; Yang D
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology, Institute of Cotton Research of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Anyang 455000, China. liwei@caas.cn.
[Ti] Title:Evolution and Stress Responses of Gossypium hirsutum SWEET Genes.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Sci;19(3), 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1422-0067
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The SWEET (sugars will eventually be exported transporters) proteins are sugar efflux transporters containing the MtN3_saliva domain, which affects plant development as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins have not been functionally characterized in the tetraploid cotton, , which is a widely cultivated cotton species. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the cotton gene family. A total of 55 putative genes were identified. The genes were classified into four clades based on a phylogenetic analysis and on the examination of gene structural features. Moreover, chromosomal localization and an analysis of homologous genes in , , and suggested that a whole-genome duplication, several tandem duplications, and a polyploidy event contributed to the expansion of the cotton gene family, especially in Clade III and IV. Analyses of -acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions, expression profiles, and artificial selection revealed that the genes were likely involved in cotton developmental processes and responses to diverse stresses. These findings may clarify the evolution of gene family and may provide a foundation for future functional studies of SWEET proteins regarding cotton development and responses to abiotic stresses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29029382
[Au] Autor:Barbosa PRR; Oliveira MD; Barros EM; Michaud JP; Torres JB
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Agronomia-Entomologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros, s/n, Dois Irmãos, Recife, PE 52171-900, Brazil. Electronic address: pagro05@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Differential impacts of six insecticides on a mealybug and its coccinellid predator.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;147:963-971, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Broad-spectrum insecticides may disrupt biological control and cause pest resurgence due to their negative impacts on natural enemies. The preservation of sustainable pest control in agroecosystems requires parallel assessments of insecticide toxicity to target pests and their key natural enemies. In the present study, the leaf dipping method was used to evaluate the relative toxicity of six insecticides to the striped mealybug, Ferrisia dasylirii (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) and its predator, Tenuisvalvae notata (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Three neurotoxic insecticides, lambda-cyhalothrin, methidathion and thiamethoxam, caused complete mortality of both pest and predator when applied at their highest field rates. In contrast, lufenuron, pymetrozine and pyriproxyfen caused moderate mortality of third-instar mealybug nymphs, and exhibited low or no toxicity to either larvae or adults of the lady beetle. At field rates, lufenuron and pymetrozine had negligible effects on prey consumption, development or reproduction of T. notata, but adults failed to emerge from pupae when fourth instar larvae were exposed to pyriproxyfen. In addition, pyriproxyfen caused temporary sterility; T. notata females laid non-viable eggs for three days after exposure, but recovered egg fertility thereafter. Our results indicate that the three neurotoxic insecticides can potentially control F. dasylirii, but are hazardous to its natural predator. In contrast, lufenuron and pymetrozine appear compatible with T. notata, although they appear less effective against the mealybug. Although the acute toxicity of pyriproxyfen to T. notata was low, some pupal mortality and reduced egg fertility suggest that this material could impede the predator's numerical response to mealybug populations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coleoptera/drug effects
Environmental Pollutants/toxicity
Hemiptera/drug effects
Insecticides/toxicity
Pest Control, Biological
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Brazil
Coleoptera/growth & development
Female
Gossypium/parasitology
Hemiptera/growth & development
Insecticides/pharmacology
Larva/drug effects
Larva/growth & development
Nymph/drug effects
Nymph/growth & development
Predatory Behavior/drug effects
Pupa/drug effects
Pupa/growth & development
Reproduction/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Environmental Pollutants); 0 (Insecticides)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171015
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513679
[Au] Autor:Huang J; Wei H; Li L; Yu S
[Ad] Address:Research Center of Buckwheat Industry Technology, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, Guizhou, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptome analysis of nitric oxide-responsive genes in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0192367, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule with diverse physiological functions in plants. It is therefore important to characterize the downstream genes and signal transduction networks modulated by NO. Here, we identified 1,932 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) responding to NO in upland cotton using high throughput tag sequencing. The results of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of 25 DEGs showed good consistency. Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway were analyzed to gain a better understanding of these DEGs. We identified 157 DEGs belonging to 36 transcription factor (TF) families and 72 DEGs related to eight plant hormones, among which several TF families and hormones were involved in stress responses. Hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were increased, as well related genes after treatment with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (an NO donor), suggesting a role for NO in the plant stress response. Finally, we compared of the current and previous data indicating a massive number of NO-responsive genes at the large-scale transcriptome level. This study evaluated the landscape of NO-responsive genes in cotton and identified the involvement of NO in the stress response. Some of the identified DEGs represent good candidates for further functional analysis in cotton.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192367

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[PMID]: 29373640
[Au] Autor:Gu S; Zhang L; Yan Z; van der Werf W; Evers JB
[Ad] Address:China Agricultural University, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Quantifying within-plant spatial heterogeneity in carbohydrate availability in cotton using a local-pool model.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;, 2018 Jan 24.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Within-plant spatial heterogeneity in the production of and demand for assimilates may have major implications for the formation of fruits. Spatial heterogeneity is related to organ age, but also to position on the plant. This study quantifies the variation in local carbohydrate availability for the phytomers in the same cohort using a cotton growth model that captures carbohydrate production in phytomers and carbohydrate movement between phytomers. Methods: Based on field observations, we developed a functional-structural plant model of cotton that simulates production and storage of carbohydrates in individual phytomers and transport of surplus to other phytomers. Simulated total leaf area, total above-ground dry mass, dry mass distribution along the stem, and dry mass allocation fractions to each organ at the plant level were compared with field observations for plants grown at different densities. The distribution of local carbohydrate availability throughout the plant was characterized and a sensitivity analysis was conducted regarding the value of the carbohydrate transport coefficient. Key Results: The model reproduced cotton leaf expansion and dry mass allocation across plant densities adequately. Individual leaf area was underestimated at very high plant densities. Best correspondence with measured plant traits was obtained for a value of the transport coefficient of 0.1 d-1. The simulated translocation of carbohydrates agreed well with results from C-labelling studies. Moreover, simulation results revealed the heterogeneous pattern of local carbohydrate availability over the plant as an emergent model property. Conclusions: This modelling study shows how heterogeneity in local carbohydrate production within the plant structure in combination with limitations in transport result in heterogeneous satisfaction of demand over the plant. This model provides a tool to explore phenomena in cotton that are thought to be determined by local carbohydrate availability, such as branching pattern and fruit abortion in relation to climate and crop management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx210

  8 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509985
[Au] Autor:Yan Q; Wang Y; Li Q; Zhang Z; Ding H; Zhang Y; Liu H; Luo M; Liu D; Song W; Liu H; Yao D; Ouyang X; Li Y; Li X; Pei Y; Xiao Y
[Ad] Address:Biotechnology Research Center, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Application and Safety Control of Genetically Modified Crops, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:Upregulation of GhTT2-3A in Cotton Fibers during Secondary Wall Thickening Results in Brown Fibers with Improved Quality.
[So] Source:Plant Biotechnol J;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1467-7652
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brown cotton fibers are the most widely used naturally colored raw materials for the eco-friendly textile industry. Previous studies have indicated that brown fiber pigments belong to proanthocyanidins (PAs) or their derivatives, and fiber coloration is negatively associated with cotton productivity and fiber quality. To date, the molecular basis controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of brown pigments in cotton fibers is largely unknown. In the present study, based on expressional and transgenic analyses of cotton homologs of Arabidopsis PA regulator TRANSPARENT TESTA 2 (TT2) and fine mapping of the cotton dark brown fiber gene (Lc1), we show that a TT2 homolog, GhTT2-3A, controls PA biosynthesis and brown pigmentation in cotton fibers. We observed that GhTT2-3A activated GhbHLH130D, a homolog of Arabidopsis TT8, which in turn synergistically acted with GhTT2-3A to activate downstream PA structural genes and PA synthesis and accumulation in cotton fibers. Furthermore, the upregulation of GhTT2-3A in fibers at the secondary wall-thickening stage resulted in brown mature fibers, and fiber quality and lint percentage were comparable to that of the white-fiber control. The findings of the present study reveal the regulatory mechanism controlling brown pigmentation in cotton fibers and demonstrate a promising biotechnological strategy to break the negative linkage between coloration and fiber quality and/or productivity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pbi.12910

  9 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29481843
[Au] Autor:Pan X; Nichols RL; Li C; Zhang B
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA. Electronic address: panx@ecu.edu.
[Ti] Title:MicroRNA-target gene responses to root knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) infection in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).
[So] Source:Genomics;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1089-8646
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large class of small regulatory RNA molecules, however no study has been performed to elucidate the role of miRNAs in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) response to the root knot nematode (RKN, Meloidogyne incognita) infection. We selected 28 miRNAs and 8 miRNA target genes to investigate the miRNA-target gene response to M. incognita infection. Our results show that RKN infection significantly affected the expression of several miRNAs and their targeted genes. After 10 days of RKN infection, expression fold changes on miRNA expressions ranged from down-regulated by 33% to upregulated by 406%; meanwhile the expression levels of miRNA target genes were 45.8% to 231%. Three miRNA-target pairs, miR159-MYB, miR319-TCP4 and miR167-ARF8, showed inverse expression patterns between gene targets and their corresponded miRNAs, suggesting miRNA-mediated gene regulation in cotton roots in response to RKN infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 6313 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506223
[Au] Autor:Wang H; Kennedy GG; Reay-Jones FPF; Reisig DD; Toews MD; Roberts PM; Herbert DA; Taylor S; Jacobson AL; Greene JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Clemson University, Edisto Research and Education Center, Blackville, SC.
[Ti] Title:Molecular Identification of Thrips Species Infesting Cotton in the Southeastern United States.
[So] Source:J Econ Entomol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-291X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traditional identification of thrips species based on morphology is difficult, laborious, and especially challenging for immature thrips. To support monitoring and management efforts of thrips as consistent and widespread pests of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), a probe-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay with crude DNA extraction was developed to allow efficient and specific identification of the primary species of thrips infesting cotton. The assay was applied to identify over 5,000 specimens of thrips (including 3,366 immatures) collected on cotton seedlings from Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia in 2016. One half of all adult samples were examined by morphological identification, which provided a statistically equivalent species composition as the qPCR method. Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was the dominant species across all the locations (76.8-94.3% of adults and 81.6-98.0% of immatures), followed by Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia (4.6-19% of adults and 1.7-17.3% of immatures) or Frankliniella tritici (Fitch) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in South Carolina (10.8% of adults and 7.8% of immatures). Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and Neohydatothrips variabilis (Beach) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were occasionally found among adults but were rarely present among immature thrips. These five species of thrips represented 98.2-100% of samples collected across the Southeast. The qPCR assay was demonstrated to be a valuable tool for large-scale monitoring of species composition of thrips at different life stages in cotton. The tool will contribute to a better understanding of thrips population structure in cotton and could assist with development and application of improved management strategies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jee/toy036


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