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[PMID]: 29364968
[Au] Autor:Petersone-Gordina E; Roberts C; Millard AR; Montgomery J; Gerhards G
[Ad] Address:Department of Archaeology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Dental disease and dietary isotopes of individuals from St Gertrude Church cemetery, Riga, Latvia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191757, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This research explores oral health indicators and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data to explore diet, and differences in diet, between people buried in the four different contexts of the St Gertrude Church cemetery (15th- 17th centuries AD): the general cemetery, two mass graves, and a collective mass burial pit within the general cemetery. The main aim is to assess whether people buried in the mass graves were rural immigrants, or if they were more likely to be the victims of plague (or another epidemic) who lived in Riga and its suburbs. The data produced (from dental disease assessments and isotope analyses) were compared within, as well as between, the contexts. Most differences emerged when comparing the prevalence rates of dental diseases and other oral health indicators in males and females between the contexts, while isotope analysis revealed more individual, rather than context-specific, differences. The data suggested that the populations buried in the mass graves were different from those buried in the general cemetery, and support the theory that rural immigrants were buried in both mass graves. Significant differences were observed in some aspects of the data between the mass graves, however, possibly indicating that the people buried in them do not represent the same community.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cemeteries
Diet
Stomatognathic Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carbon Isotopes/analysis
Humans
Latvia/epidemiology
Nitrogen Isotopes/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carbon Isotopes); 0 (Nitrogen Isotopes)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191757

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[PMID]: 29521049
[Au] Autor:Kapelko-Slowik K; Slowik M; Szalinski M; Dybko J; Wolowiec D; Prajs I; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak A; Biernat M; Urbaniak-Kujda D
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology, Blood Neoplasms and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Elevated serum concentrations of metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) in patients with Graves' orbitopathy.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;27(1):99-103, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Graves' orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, is characterized by dramatic tissue reactivity. Both inflammation and tissue remodeling characterize the clinical course of GO. Some data has been found regarding the association of MMPs and TIMPs in GO. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum concentrations of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were determined by ELISA method. OBJECTIVES: Forty-eight patients (34 females, 14 males, with median age 51.5 years) with GD and hyperthyroidism were enrolled in the study. In 28 patients, active, moderate-to-severe grade orbitopathy was diagnosed. The aim of this study was to assess the serum concentrations of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in patients with Graves' disease (GD), with and without GO, and their relationship with disease severity, as well as to evaluate how these concentrations change after successful treatment. RESULTS: Median serum concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were significantly higher in all patients with GD as well as in the subgroup with GO than in the control group. Median serum concentrations of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly higher in all patients with GD than in controls. The same significant differences were observed in the subgroups with and without GO in comparison with controls. The GO subgroup showed a significant positive correlation between the MMP-9 concentration and the serum level of TSHRAb antibodies, and a clinical activity score ≥4 according to EUGOGO. CONCLUSIONS: In our study we found that only MMP-9 differentiates the patients with and without GO, and may be used as a marker of the disease severity in patients with this manifestation of GD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/68991

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[PMID]: 29325052
[Au] Autor:Martínez-Hernández R; Sampedro-Núñez M; Serrano-Somavilla A; Ramos-Leví AM; de la Fuente H; Triviño JC; Sanz-García A; Sánchez-Madrid F; Marazuela M
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:A MicroRNA Signature for Evaluation of Risk and Severity of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;103(3):1139-1150, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as an interesting research area because of their potential role as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Their involvement in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) has not been fully explored. Objective: To compare the expression profile of miRNAs in thyroid tissue from patients with AITD and controls, using next-generation sequencing, further validated our findings in thyroid and serum samples. Design: Twenty fresh-frozen thyroid tissues (15 from patients with AITD and 5 from controls) were used for miRNA next-generation sequencing. Thirty-six thyroid samples were recruited for the qRT-PCR validation test and 58 serum samples for further validation in peripheral blood. Results: Expression of several miRNAs that had been previously associated with relevant immunological functions was significantly dysregulated. Specifically, eight differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-142-3p, miR-146a-5p, miR-146b-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-338-5p, miR-342-5p, and miR-766-3p) were confirmed using qRT-PCR in thyroid samples, and three had the same behavior in tissue and serum samples (miR-21-5p, miR-142-3p, and miR-146a-5p). Furthermore, when the expression of these miRNAs was assessed together with five additional ones previously related to AITD in peripheral blood, the expression of five (miR-Let7d-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-96-5p, miR-142-3p, and miR-301a-3p) was significantly expressed in AITD and, in patients with Graves disease (GD), was correlated with a higher severity of disease, including active ophthalmopathy, goiter, higher antibody titers, and/or higher recurrence rates. Conclusions: The present findings identify a serum five-signature miRNA that could be an independent risk factor for developing AITD and a predisposition of a worse clinical picture in patients with GD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-02318

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[PMID]: 29297082
[Au] Autor:Prescott HC; Angus DC
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine and Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
[Ti] Title:Enhancing Recovery From Sepsis: A Review.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(1):62-75, 2018 01 02.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Survival from sepsis has improved in recent years, resulting in an increasing number of patients who have survived sepsis treatment. Current sepsis guidelines do not provide guidance on posthospital care or recovery. Observations: Each year, more than 19 million individuals develop sepsis, defined as a life-threatening acute organ dysfunction secondary to infection. Approximately 14 million survive to hospital discharge and their prognosis varies. Half of patients recover, one-third die during the following year, and one-sixth have severe persistent impairments. Impairments include development of an average of 1 to 2 new functional limitations (eg, inability to bathe or dress independently), a 3-fold increase in prevalence of moderate to severe cognitive impairment (from 6.1% before hospitalization to 16.7% after hospitalization), and a high prevalence of mental health problems, including anxiety (32% of patients who survive), depression (29%), or posttraumatic stress disorder (44%). About 40% of patients are rehospitalized within 90 days of discharge, often for conditions that are potentially treatable in the outpatient setting, such as infection (11.9%) and exacerbation of heart failure (5.5%). Compared with patients hospitalized for other diagnoses, those who survive sepsis (11.9%) are at increased risk of recurrent infection than matched patients (8.0%) matched patients (P < .001), acute renal failure (3.3% vs 1.2%, P < .001), and new cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] range, 1.1-1.4). Reasons for deterioration of health after sepsis are multifactorial and include accelerated progression of preexisting chronic conditions, residual organ damage, and impaired immune function. Characteristics associated with complications after hospital discharge for sepsis treatment are not fully understood but include both poorer presepsis health status, characteristics of the acute septic episode (eg, severity of infection, host response to infection), and quality of hospital treatment (eg, timeliness of initial sepsis care, avoidance of treatment-related harms). Although there is a paucity of clinical trial evidence to support specific postdischarge rehabilitation treatment, experts recommend referral to physical therapy to improve exercise capacity, strength, and independent completion of activities of daily living. This recommendation is supported by an observational study involving 30 000 sepsis survivors that found that referral to rehabilitation within 90 days was associated with lower risk of 10-year mortality compared with propensity-matched controls (adjusted HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97, P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In the months after hospital discharge for sepsis, management should focus on (1) identifying new physical, mental, and cognitive problems and referring for appropriate treatment, (2) reviewing and adjusting long-term medications, and (3) evaluating for treatable conditions that commonly result in hospitalization, such as infection, heart failure, renal failure, and aspiration. For patients with poor or declining health prior to sepsis who experience further deterioration after sepsis, it may be appropriate to focus on palliation of symptoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Sepsis/complications
Sepsis/rehabilitation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Cognition Disorders/etiology
Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mental Disorders/etiology
Sepsis/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180104
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.17687

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[PMID]: 29409002
[Au] Autor:Houcken J; Degenhart C; Bender K; König J; Frommer L; Kahaly GJ
[Ad] Address:Molecular Thyroid Research Laboratory (JH, CD, LF, GJK), Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany.
[Ti] Title:PTPN22 and CTLA-4 Polymorphisms are Associated with Polyglandular Autoimmunity.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of various genes increase susceptibility to monoglandular autoimmunity. Scarce data are available in autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS). Objective: Evaluate potential associations of eight SNP with APS. Setting: Academic referral endocrine clinic. Patients: A total of 543 patients with APS, monoglandular autoimmunity and controls. Intervention: The SNP protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) rs2476601 (+1858), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) rs3087243 (CT60) and rs231775 (AG49), Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) rs1544410 (Bsm I), rs7975232 (Apa I), rs731236 (Taq I), tumor necrosis factor alpha rs1800630 (-863) and Interleukin-2 receptor alpha rs10795791 were tested by single base extension in all subjects. Results: The PTPN22 +1858 allele and genotype distribution were markedly different between APS, type 1 diabetes (T1D) OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.52-4.68, p=0.001, Graves' disease (GD), OR 1.94, 1.16-3.25, p=0.011, and controls OR 3.31, 1.82-6.02, p<0.001. T-allele carriers risk for APS was increased (OR 3.76, 1.97-7.14, p<0.001). T-allele frequency was higher among APS compared to controls (OR 3.25, 1.82-5.82, p<0.001), T1D (OR 2.54, 1.48-4.36, p=0.001) or GD (OR 1.89, 1.15-3.11, p=0.012). The SNP CTLA-4 CT60 G-allele carriers were more frequent in APS (85%) than controls (78%) OR 1.55, 0.81-2.99. Combined analysis of CTLA-4 AG49 and CT60 revealed an OR 4.89, 1.86-13.59, p=0.00018 of the genotype combination AG/GG for APS versus controls. VDR polymorphisms Bsm I, Apa I and Taq I did not, but the haplotypes differed between APS and controls (p=0.0011). Conclusions: PTPN22 and CTLA-4 polymorphisms are associated with APS and differentiate between polyglandular and monoglandular autoimmunity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-02577

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[PMID]: 29028222
[Au] Autor:Choi HJ; Joo HS; Won HY; Min KW; Kim HY; Son T; Oh YH; Lee JY; Kong G
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Institute for Bioengineering and Biopharmaceutical Research (IBBR), Hanyang University,
[Ti] Title:Role of RBP2-Induced ER and IGF1R-ErbB Signaling in Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.
[So] Source:J Natl Cancer Inst;110(4), 2018 Apr 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2105
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Despite the benefit of endocrine therapy, acquired resistance during or after treatment still remains a major challenge in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. We investigated the potential role of histone demethylase retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2) in endocrine therapy resistance of breast cancer. Methods: Survival of breast cancer patients according to RBP2 expression was analyzed in three different breast cancer cohorts including METABRIC (n = 1980) and KM plotter (n = 1764). RBP2-mediated tamoxifen resistance was confirmed by invitro sulforhodamine B (SRB) colorimetric, colony-forming assays, and invivo xenograft models (n = 8 per group). RNA-seq analysis and receptor tyrosine kinase assay were performed to identify the tamoxifen resistance mechanism by RBP2. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: RBP2 was associated with poor prognosis to tamoxifen therapy in ER-positive breast cancer (P = .04 in HYU cohort, P = .02 in KM plotter, P = .007 in METABRIC, log-rank test). Furthermore, RBP2 expression was elevated in patients with tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer (P = .04, chi-square test). Knockdown of RBP2 conferred tamoxifen sensitivity, whereas overexpression of RBP2 induced tamoxifen resistance invitro and invivo (MCF7 xenograft: tamoxifen-treated control, mean [SD] tumor volume = 70.8 [27.9] mm3, vs tamoxifen-treated RBP2, mean [SD] tumor volume = 387.9 [85.1] mm3, P < .001). Mechanistically, RBP2 cooperated with ER co-activators and corepressors and regulated several tamoxifen resistance-associated genes, including NRIP1, CCND1, and IGFBP4 and IGFBP5. Furthermore, epigenetic silencing of IGFBP4/5 by RBP2-ER-NRIP1-HDAC1 complex led to insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) activation. RBP2 also increased IGF1R-ErbB crosstalk and subsequent PI3K-AKT activation via demethylase activity-independent ErbB protein stabilization. Combinational treatment with tamoxifen and PI3K inhibitor could overcome RBP2-mediated tamoxifen resistance (RBP2-overexpressing cells: % cell viability [SD], tamoxifen = 89.0 [3.8]%, vs tamoxifen with BKM120 = 41.3 [5.6]%, P < .001). Conclusions: RBP2 activates ER-IGF1R-ErbB signaling cascade in multiple ways to induce tamoxifen resistance, suggesting that RBP2 is a potential therapeutic target for ER-driven cancer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Breast Neoplasms/metabolism
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/metabolism
Drug Resistance, Neoplasm
Neoplasm Proteins/physiology
Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism
Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 2/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms/chemistry
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy
Breast Neoplasms/pathology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/chemistry
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology
Carrier Proteins/metabolism
Cohort Studies
Colorimetry
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/genetics
Female
Heterografts
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
MCF-7 Cells
Mice
Mice, Inbred NOD
Mice, SCID
Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism
Neoplastic Stem Cells
Nuclear Proteins/metabolism
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism
Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism
Receptor, IGF Type 1/metabolism
Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 2/metabolism
Tamoxifen/therapeutic use
Tumor Burden
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal); 0 (Carrier Proteins); 0 (IGFBP5-interacting protein, human); 0 (Neoplasm Proteins); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Receptors, Estrogen); 0 (nuclear receptor interacting protein 1); 094ZI81Y45 (Tamoxifen); EC 1.14.11.27 (Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 2); EC 2.7.1.- (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases); EC 2.7.10.1 (Receptor, ErbB-2); EC 2.7.10.1 (Receptor, IGF Type 1)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171014
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jnci/djx207

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[PMID]: 28749089
[Au] Autor:Vijverberg EGB; Schouws S; Meesters PD; Verwijk E; Comijs H; Koene T; Schreuder C; Beekman A; Scheltens P; Stek M; Pijnenburg Y; Dols A
[Ad] Address:Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Center, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.vijverberg@vumc.nl.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive Deficits in Patients With Neuropsychiatric Symptoms: A Comparative Study Between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Primary Psychiatric Disorders.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychiatry;78(8):e940-e946, 2017 Sep/Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1555-2101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To compare neuropsychological profiles in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) with its most common primary psychiatric differential diagnoses, major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BD), and schizophrenia, in older patients with active symptoms. METHODS: We included patients from different cohorts with MDD (DSM-IV-TR: 296.20-296.23, 296.30-296.33; n = 42; mean ± SD age, 72.0 ± 8.0 years; female = 57.1%) included from 2002 to 2007, noneuthymic BD (DSM-IV-TR: 296.00-296.06, 296.40-296.46, 296.50-296.56, 296.60-296.66, 296.7; DSM-IV-TR: 296.89; DSM-IV-TR: 296.80; n = 41; age, 71.7 ± 8.8 years; female = 53.7%) included from 2011 to 2015, nonremitted schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR: 295.10, 295.20, 295.30, 295.60, 295.90; n = 47; age, 67.5 ± 7.1 years; female = 66%) included from 2006 to 2008, or probable/definite bvFTD (n = 173; age, 62.6 ± 8.0 years; female = 39.9%) (Frontotemporal Dementia Consensus criteria) included from 2000 to 2015 and healthy controls (n = 78; age, 71.9 ± 8.0 years; female = 71.8%) included from 2005 to 2007. Neuropsychological tests concerned the domains of attention and working memory, verbal memory, verbal fluency, and executive functioning. Analyses of variance were performed with age, gender, and education level as covariates. Post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to detail group differences. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, both the bvFTD and primary psychiatric disorder groups showed significant impairment on all cognitive domains. Executive function was more disturbed in all primary psychiatric disorders compared to bvFTD (P < .001). Attention and working memory were significantly better in the bvFTD and schizophrenia groups compared to the MDD and BD groups (P < .001). For verbal memory, the bvFTD group scored significantly higher compared to patients with schizophrenia, BD, or MDD (P < .001). Patients with bvFTD had significantly lower scores on verbal fluency, especially due to Animal Naming, in comparison with the BD group (P < .001); however, these scores were not significantly different from those of MDD or schizophrenia patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive deficits in bvFTD are less severe than in primary psychiatric disorders with active symptoms. This indicates that in the differential diagnosis of bvFTD, disturbances on tests for cognitive performance do not rule out primary psychiatric diagnoses.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cognitive Dysfunction
Frontotemporal Dementia
Mental Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis
Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology
Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Executive Function
Female
Frontotemporal Dementia/complications
Frontotemporal Dementia/diagnosis
Frontotemporal Dementia/psychology
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Memory
Mental Disorders/classification
Mental Disorders/complications
Mental Disorders/diagnosis
Mental Disorders/psychology
Netherlands/epidemiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 70042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28471339
[Au] Autor:López S; Faro C; Lopetegui L; Pujol-Ribera E; Monteagudo M; Avecilla-Palau À; Martínez C; Cobo J; Fernández MI
[Ad] Address:a Programmes for Sexual and Reproductive Care of Catalonia , Catalan Health Institute , Barcelona , Spain.
[Ti] Title:Child and Adolescent Sexual Abuse in Women Seeking Help for Sexual and Reproductive Mental Health Problems: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Disclosure.
[So] Source:J Child Sex Abus;26(3):246-269, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1547-0679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This is a multicentric, descriptive, cross-sectional study of child and adolescent sexual abuse in women over 18 years in 24 primary care sexual and reproductive health centers in Catalonia. A total of 1,013 women were recruited; 345 (37.6%, 95% CI: 34.6-40.9) reported exposure to child sexual abuse: 32.4% disclosed being touched in a sexual way, and 9.6% reported completed sexual intercourse. Abuse occured before the age of 13 in 63.4% of respondents. The perpetrator was a relative or an acquaintance in almost 80% of cases. The risk was higher among women of Central or South American origin (OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 1.33-6.12). Only 31.9% of women disclosed the abuse and 17.3% were blamed. Abuse that involved attempted or completed sexual intercourse was significantly associated with recurrence, physical violence, and revictimization in adulthood.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adult Survivors of Child Abuse/psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual/psychology
Mental Disorders/epidemiology
Reproductive Health Services/utilization
Self Disclosure
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual/statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Help-Seeking Behavior
Humans
Mental Disorders/etiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology
Spain/epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/10538712.2017.1288186

  9 / 70042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28453238
[Au] Autor:Osman OT; Souid AK; Al-Mugaddam F; Eapen BR; Jafferany M
[Ad] Address:College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, PO Box 17666, Alain, Abu Dhabi 00000, United Arab Emirates. ossamao@uaeu.ac.ae.
[Ti] Title:Attentiveness of Dermatologists in the Middle East to Psychocutaneous Medicine.
[So] Source:Prim Care Companion CNS Disord;19(2), 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:2155-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Patients with skin diseases often have psychological problems and complications that require assessment and treatment. The main objective of this study was to explore attentiveness of dermatologists to psychiatric symptoms in their patients. Methods: A previously validated online questionnaire was used to explore the attitude and experience of dermatologists practicing in the Middle East toward the assessment of the psychiatric needs of their patients. The survey also inquired about awareness of available resources in dealing with psychodermatology. This online survey was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Results: Of 70 invited dermatologists, 57 (81%) completed the survey. Fifteen respondents (31%) received no training and had attended no educational events on psychodermatology. Only 19 respondents (33%) were able to identify psychodermatology as psychiatric components of skin diseases and dermatologic symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Twenty respondents (41%) reported frequent experience with psychodermatology, and 14 (28%) were "very comfortable" in diagnosing and treating psychodermatology patients. Twenty-two respondents (47%) recognized psychocutaneous involvement in 10% to 25% of their patients, while 18 (36%) recognized it in < 10% of their patients. Recognized diagnoses that required referral for psychiatric assessment included trichotillomania (34%), delusion of parasitosis (22%), depression (18%), dysmorphophobias (16%), dermatitis (10%), and venereophobia (10%). Forty-five respondents (90%) were unaware of psychodermatology resources. The majority of respondents expressed interest in education on depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder. Conclusions: Psychocutaneous involvements are common among dermatologic patients. A large number of the surveyed dermatologists had no training or education in psychodermatology. A lack of familiarity with patient and family resources on psychocutaneous conditions was also evident. These findings support the need for improvement in training and education in psychodermatology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Attention
Dermatologists/psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Mental Disorders/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders/complications
Middle Aged
Middle East
Skin Diseases/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4088/PCC.16m02080

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[PMID]: 29510406
[Au] Autor:Li L; Ding X; Wang X; Yao Q; Shao X; An X; Yan N; Jiang Y; Wang W; Shi L; Qin Q; Song R; Zhang JA; Sun P
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Polymorphisms of IKZF3 Gene and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases: Associated with Graves' Disease but Not with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.
[So] Source:Cell Physiol Biochem;45(5):1787-1796, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1421-9778
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: The IKZF3 gene encodes a zinc-finger protein that plays an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of B lymphocytes. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), mainly include Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), are probably caused by the aberrant proliferation of B cells. The objective of this study was to explore the association between IKZF3 polymorphisms and AITDs. METHODS: We examined 915 AITD patients (604 GD and 311 HT) and 814 healthy controls. IKZF3 variants (rs2941522, rs907091, rs1453559, rs12150079 and rs2872507) were tested by PCR-ligase detection reaction. RESULTS: It was manifested that that the minor alleles of the five loci increased susceptibility to GD (p<0.05 for rs2941522, and p<0.01 for rs907091, rs1453559, rs12150079 and rs2872507) but in HT patients, these loci showed no significant difference compared with controls. Similarly, the genotype distributions of GD patients manifested obvious differences in all these loci compared with the control group, whereas no statistical differences were observed between HT patients and controls. Furthermore, bioinformatics tools were used to analyze rs1453559, rs12150079 and rs907091. These variants were believed to be the transcription regulator. CONCLUSION: It is the first time we reported the association between the IKZF3 polymorphisms and GD, indicating that IKZF3 gene tends to bean important risk factor for the development of GD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000487870


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