Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Gymnosperms [Words]
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[PMID]: 29304388
[Au] Autor:Liesche J; Schulz A
[Ad] Address:College of Life Science, Department of Biology, Northwest A&F University, 3 Taicheng Road, 712100 Yangling, Shaanxi, China.
[Ti] Title:Phloem transport in gymnosperms: a question of pressure and resistance.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Plant Biol;43:36-42, 2018 Jan 04.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0356
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Even in the highest trees, carbon is efficiently distributed from leaves to heterotrophic tissues like fruit, flowers and roots. This long-distance transport happens in the highly specialized sieve elements of the phloem. In gymnosperms, sieve element anatomy appears to be less suited for mass flow of phloem sap than that of angiosperms. This review covers available data on gymnosperm phloem to evaluate if it functions differently from that of angiosperms. Although current evidence suggests that, despite a higher pathway resistance, a single source-to-sink turgor pressure gradient can drive mass flow, several questions remain unanswered. These include how endoplasmic reticulum-complexes in sieve elements influence flow, as well as what the effect of symplasmic coupling along the whole phloem pathway could be.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29373642
[Au] Autor:Roignant J; Badel É; Leblanc-Fournier N; Brunel-Michac N; Ruelle J; Moulia B; Decourteix M
[Ad] Address:Université Clermont Auvergne, INRA, PIAF, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
[Ti] Title:Feeling stretched or compressed? The multiple mechanosensitive responses of wood formation to bending.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;, 2018 Jan 24.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Trees constantly experience wind, perceive resulting mechanical cues, and modify their growth and development accordingly. Previous studies have demonstrated that multiple bending treatments trigger ovalization of the stem and the formation of flexure wood in gymnosperms, but ovalization and flexure wood have rarely been studied in angiosperms, and none of the experiments conducted so far has used multidirectional bending treatments at controlled intensities. Assuming that bending involves tensile and compressive strain, we hypothesized that different local strains may generate specific growth and wood differentiation responses. Methods: Basal parts of young poplar stems were subjected to multiple transient controlled unidirectional bending treatments during 8 weeks, which enabled a distinction to be made between the wood formed under tensile or compressive flexural strains. This set-up enabled a local analysis of poplar stem responses to multiple stem bending treatments at growth, anatomical, biochemical and molecular levels. Key Results: In response to multiple unidirectional bending treatments, poplar stems developed significant cross-sectional ovalization. At the tissue level, some aspects of wood differentiation were similarly modulated in the compressed and stretched zones (vessel frequency and diameter of fibres without a G-layer), whereas other anatomical traits (vessel diameter, G-layer formation, diameter of fibres with a G-layer and microfibril angle) and the expression of fasciclin-encoding genes were differentially modulated in the two zones. Conclusions: This work leads us to propose new terminologies to distinguish the 'flexure wood' produced in response to multiple bidirectional bending treatments from wood produced under transient tensile strain (tensile flexure wood; TFW) or under transient compressive strain (compressive flexure wood; CFW). By highlighting similarities and differences between tension wood and TFW and by demonstrating that plants could have the ability to discriminate positive strains from negative strains, this work provides new insight into the mechanisms of mechanosensitivity in plants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcx211

  3 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29343713
[Au] Autor:Hare VJ; Loftus E; Jeffrey A; Ramsey CB
[Ad] Address:Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3TG, UK. vincent.john.hare@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Atmospheric CO effect on stable carbon isotope composition of terrestrial fossil archives.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):252, 2018 01 17.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The C/ C ratio of C plant matter is thought to be controlled by the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO and stomatal response to environmental conditions, particularly mean annual precipitation (MAP). The effect of CO concentration on C/ C ratios is currently debated, yet crucial to reconstructing ancient environments and quantifying the carbon cycle. Here we compare high-resolution ice core measurements of atmospheric CO with fossil plant and faunal isotope records. We show the effect of pCO during the last deglaciation is stronger for gymnosperms (-1.4 ± 1.2‰) than angiosperms/fauna (-0.5 ± 1.5‰), while the contributions from changing MAP are -0.3 ± 0.6‰ and -0.4 ± 0.4‰, respectively. Previous studies have assumed that plant C/ C ratios are mostly determined by MAP, an assumption which is sometimes incorrect in geological time. Atmospheric effects must be taken into account when interpreting terrestrial stable carbon isotopes, with important implications for past environments and climates, and understanding plant responses to climate change.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Atmosphere/chemistry
Carbon Dioxide/chemistry
Carbon Isotopes/analysis
Climate
Fossils
Plants/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carbon Cycle
Carbon Isotopes/chemistry
Climate Change
Photosynthesis
Rain
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carbon Isotopes); 142M471B3J (Carbon Dioxide)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02691-x

  4 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501924
[Au] Autor:Chaiprasongsuk M; Zhang C; Qian P; Chen X; Li G; Trigiano RN; Guo H; Chen F
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Biochemical characterization in Norway spruce (Picea abies) of SABATH methyltransferases that methylate phytohormones.
[So] Source:Phytochemistry;149:146-154, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellins (GAs), salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) exist in methyl ester forms in plants in addition to their free acid forms. The enzymes that catalyze methylation of these carboxylic acid phytohormones belong to a same protein family, the SABATH methyltransferases. While the genes encoding these enzymes have been isolated from a small number of flowering plants, little is known about their occurrence and evolution in non-flowering plants. Here, we report the systematic characterization of the SABATH family from Norway spruce (Picea abies), a gymnosperm. The Norway spruce genome contains ten SABATH genes (PaSABATH1-10). Full-length cDNA for each of the ten PaSABATH genes was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PaSABATHs were tested for activity with IAA, GA, SA, and JA. Among the ten PaSABATHs, five had activity with one or more of the four substrates. PaSABATH1 and PaSABATH2 had the highest activities with IAA and SA, respectively. PaSABATH4, PaSABATH5 and PaSABATH10 all had JA as a preferred substrate but with notable differences in biochemical properties. The structural basis of PaSABATHs in discriminating various phytohormone substrates was inferred based on structural models of the enzyme-substrate complexes. The phylogeny of PaSABATHs with selected SABATHs from other plants implies that the enzymes methylating IAA are conserved in seed plants whereas the enzymes methylating JA and SA have independent evolution in gymnosperms and angiosperms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29499063
[Au] Autor:Reza SH; Delhomme N; Street NR; Ramachandran P; Dalman K; Nilsson O; Minina EA; Bozhkov PV
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Linnean Center for Plant Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, SE, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptome analysis of embryonic domains in Norway spruce reveals potential regulators of suspensor cell death.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0192945, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The terminal differentiation and elimination of the embryo-suspensor is the earliest manifestation of programmed cell death (PCD) during plant ontogenesis. Molecular regulation of suspensor PCD remains poorly understood. Norway spruce (Picea abies) embryos provide a powerful model for studying embryo development because of their large size, sequenced genome, and the possibility to obtain a large number of embryos at a specific developmental stage through somatic embryogenesis. Here, we have carried out global gene expression analysis of the Norway spruce embryo-suspensor versus embryonal mass (a gymnosperm analogue of embryo proper) using RNA sequencing. We have identified that suspensors have enhanced expression of the NAC domain-containing transcription factors, XND1 and ANAC075, previously shown to be involved in the initiation of developmental PCD in Arabidiopsis. The analysis has also revealed enhanced expression of Norway spruce homologues of the known executioners of both developmental and stress-induced cell deaths, such as metacaspase 9 (MC9), cysteine endopeptidase-1 (CEP1) and ribonuclease 3 (RNS3). Interestingly, a spruce homologue of bax inhibitor-1 (PaBI-1, for Picea abies BI-1), an evolutionarily conserved cell death suppressor, was likewise up-regulated in the embryo-suspensor. Since Arabidopsis BI-1 so far has been implicated only in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress induced cell death, we investigated its role in embryogenesis and suspensor PCD using RNA interference (RNAi). We have found that PaBI-1-deficient lines formed a large number of abnormal embryos with suppressed suspensor elongation and disturbed polarity. Cytochemical staining of suspensor cells has revealed that PaBI-1 deficiency suppresses vacuolar cell death and induces necrotic type of cell death previously shown to compromise embryo development. This study demonstrates that a large number of cell-death components are conserved between angiosperms and gymnosperms and establishes a new role for BI-1 in the progression of vacuolar cell death.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192945

  6 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476087
[Au] Autor:Nel P; Bertrand S; Nel A
[Ad] Address:Institut de Systématique, Évolution, Biodiversité, ISYEB-UMR 7205-CNRS, MNHN, UPMC, EPHE, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Sorbonne Universités, 57 rue Cuvier, CP 50, Entomologie, F-75005, Paris, France. patricia.nel@mnhn.fr.
[Ti] Title:Diversification of insects since the Devonian: a new approach based on morphological disparity of mouthparts.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3516, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The majority of the analyses of the evolutionary history of the megadiverse class Insecta are based on the documented taxonomic palaeobiodiversity. A different approach, poorly investigated, is to focus on morphological disparity, linked to changes in the organisms' functioning. Here we establish a hierarchy of the great geological epochs based on a new method using Wagner parsimony and a 'presence/absence of a morphological type of mouthpart of Hexapoda' dataset. We showed the absence of major rupture in the evolution of the mouthparts, but six epochs during which numerous innovations and few extinctions happened, i.e., Late Carboniferous, Middle and Late Triassic, 'Callovian-Oxfordian', 'Early' Cretaceous, and 'Albian-Cenomanian'. The three crises Permian-Triassic, Triassic-Jurassic, and Cretaceous-Cenozoic had no strong, visible impact on mouthparts types. We particularly emphasize the origination of mouthparts linked to nectarivory during the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution. We also underline the origination of mouthparts linked to phytophagy during the Middle and the Late Triassic, correlated to the diversification of the gymnosperms, especially in relation to the complex 'flowers' producing nectar of the Bennettitales and Gnetales.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-21938-1

  7 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491164
[Au] Autor:Gong Z; Han GZ
[Ad] Address:Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Microbes and Functional Genomics, Jiangsu Engineering and Technology Research Center for Microbiology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210046, China.
[Ti] Title:Euphyllophyte paleoviruses illuminate hidden diversity and macroevolutionary mode of .
[So] Source:J Virol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endogenous viral elements (paleoviruses) provide 'molecular fossils' for studying the deep history and macroevolution of viruses. Endogenous plant pararetroviruses (EPRVs) are widespread in angiosperms, but little is known about EPRVs in earlier branching plants. Here we use a large-scale phylogenomic approach to investigate the diversity and macroevolution of plant pararetroviruses (formally known as ). We uncover an unprecedented and unappreciated diversity of EPRVs within the genomes of gymnosperms and ferns. The known angiosperm viruses only constitute a minor part of the diversity. By characterizing the distribution of EPRVs, we show that no major euphyllophyte lineages escape the activity of , raising the possibility that many exogenous remain to be discovered in euphyllophytes. We find that the copy numbers of EPRVs are generally high, suggesting that EPRVs might define a unique group of repetitive elements and represent important components of euphyllophyte genomes. Evolutionary analyses suggest an ancient origin of and at least three independent origins of in angiosperms. Our findings reveal the remarkable diversity of and have important implications in understanding the origin and macroevolution of plant pararetroviruses. Few viruses have been documented in plants outside angiosperms. Viruses can occasionally integrate into host genomes, forming endogenous viral elements (EVEs). Endogenous plant pararetroviruses (EPRVs) are widespread in angiosperms. In this study, we performed comprehensive comparative and phylogenetic analyses of EPRVs and found EPRVs are present in the genomes of gymnosperms and ferns. We identified numerous EPRVs in gymnosperm and fern genomes, revealing an unprecedented depth in the diversity of plant pararetroviruses. Plant pararetroviruses mainly underwent cross-species transmission and angiosperm pararetroviruses arose at least three times. Our study provides novel insights into the diversity and macroevolution of plant pararetroviruses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29488293
[Au] Autor:Gazol A; Camarero JJ; Vicente-Serrano SM; Sánchez-Salguero R; Gutiérrez E; de Luis M; Sangüesa-Barreda G; Novak K; Rozas V; Tíscar PA; Linares JC; Martín-Hernández N; Martínez Del Castillo E; Ribas M; García-González I; Silla F; Camisón A; Génova M; Olano JM; Longares LA; Hevia A; Tomás-Burguera M; Galván JD
[Ad] Address:Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (IPE-CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Forest resilience to drought varies across biomes.
[So] Source:Glob Chang Biol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2486
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Forecasted increase drought frequency and severity may drive worldwide declines in forest productivity. Species-level responses to a drier world are likely to be influenced by their functional traits. Here, we analyse forest resilience to drought using an extensive network of tree-ring width data and satellite imagery. We compiled proxies of forest growth and productivity (TRWi, absolutely dated ring-width indices; NDVI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) for 11 tree species and 502 forests in Spain corresponding to Mediterranean, temperate, and continental biomes. Four different components of forest resilience to drought were calculated based on TRWi and NDVI data before, during, and after four major droughts (1986, 1994-1995, 1999, and 2005), and pointed out that TRWi data were more sensitive metrics of forest resilience to drought than NDVI data. Resilience was related to both drought severity and forest composition. Evergreen gymnosperms dominating semi-arid Mediterranean forests showed the lowest resistance to drought, but higher recovery than deciduous angiosperms dominating humid temperate forests. Moreover, semi-arid gymnosperm forests presented a negative temporal trend in the resistance to drought, but this pattern was absent in continental and temperate forests. Although gymnosperms in dry Mediterranean forests showed a faster recovery after drought, their recovery potential could be constrained if droughts become more frequent. Conversely, angiosperms and gymnosperms inhabiting temperate and continental sites might have problems to recover after more intense droughts since they resist drought but are less able to recover afterwards.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/gcb.14082

  9 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29242378
[Au] Autor:Wada S; Yamamoto H; Suzuki Y; Yamori W; Shikanai T; Makino A
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Flavodiiron Protein Substitutes for Cyclic Electron Flow without Competing CO Assimilation in Rice.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol;176(2):1509-1518, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Flavodiiron protein (FLV) mediates photoreduction of O to H O. It is conserved from cyanobacteria to gymnosperms but not in angiosperms. The introduction of a moss ( ) ( ) gene into Arabidopsis ( ) made photosystem I (PSI) resistant to fluctuating light. Here, we used the same strategy with three rice ( ) genotypes. PpFLV in the wild-type rice background functioned as an efficient PSI electron sink and increased resistance to PSI photodamage under fluctuating light. The introduction of PpFLV into the -RNAi mutant [defective in PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5)-dependent cyclic electron transport around PSI, CET-PSI], the mutant [defective in chloroplast NAD(P)H-dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH)-dependent CET-PSI], and the -RNAi double mutant (double defective in CET-PSI activity) alleviated PSI photodamage under fluctuating light. Furthermore, PpFLV substituted for the function of PGR5- and NDH-dependent CET-PSI without competing for CO assimilation under constant light, as there was no difference in CO assimilation per Rubisco content and biomass production was recovered to the wild-type level. Thus, the exogenous FLV system could act not only as a safety valve under fluctuating light, but also generate a proton motive force for balancing the ATP/NADPH production ratio during steady-state photosynthesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1104/pp.17.01335

  10 / 1344 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462244
[Au] Autor:Vuosku J; Karppinen K; Muilu-Mäkelä R; Kusano T; Sagor GHM; Avia K; Alakärppä E; Kestilä J; Suokas M; Nickolov K; Hamberg L; Savolainen O; Häggman H; Sarjala T
[Ad] Address:University of Oulu, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Oulu, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Scots pine aminopropyltransferases shed new light on evolution of the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in seed plants.
[So] Source:Ann Bot;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8290
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background and Aims: Polyamines are small metabolites present in all living cells and play fundamental roles in numerous physiological events in plants. The aminopropyltransferases (APTs), spermidine synthase (SPDS), spermine synthase (SPMS) and thermospermine synthase (ACL5), are essential enzymes in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. In angiosperms, SPMS has evolved from SPDS via gene duplication, whereas in gymnosperms APTs are mostly unexplored and no SPMS gene has been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the functional properties of the SPDS and ACL5 proteins of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in order to elucidate the role and evolution of APTs in higher plants. Methods: Germinating Scots pine seeds and seedlings were analysed for polyamines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the expression of PsSPDS and PsACL5 genes by in situ hybridization. Recombinant proteins of PsSPDS and PsACL5 were produced and investigated for functional properties. Also gene structures, promoter regions and phylogenetic relationships of PsSPDS and PsACL5 genes were analysed. Key Results: Scots pine tissues were found to contain spermidine, spermine and thermospermine. PsSPDS enzyme catalysed synthesis of both spermidine and spermine. PsACL5 was found to produce thermospermine, and PsACL5 gene expression was localized in the developing procambium in embryos and tracheary elements in seedlings. Conclusions: Contrary to previous views, our results demonstrate that SPMS activity is not a novel feature developed solely in the angiosperm lineage of seed plants but also exists as a secondary property in the Scots pine SPDS enzyme. The discovery of bifunctional SPDS from an evolutionarily old conifer reveals the missing link in the evolution of the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. The finding emphasizes the importance of pre-existing secondary functions in the evolution of new enzyme activities via gene duplication. Our results also associate PsACL5 with the development of vascular structures in Scots pine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/aob/mcy012


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