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[PMID]: 29522999
[Au] Autor:Pickering J; Teo TH; Thornton RB; Kirkham LA; Zosky GR; Clifford HD
[Ad] Address:Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. Electronic address: Janessa.pickering@uwa.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Bacillus licheniformis in geogenic dust induces inflammation in respiratory epithelium.
[So] Source:Environ Res;164:248-254, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0953
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Exposure to environmental geogenic (or earth-derived) dust can lead to more frequent and severe infections in the human airway. Particulate matter < 10 µm (PM ) is the component of air pollution that is commonly associated with the exacerbation of respiratory diseases. We have previously demonstrated that mice exposed to geogenic dust PM experienced an exacerbation of inflammatory responses to influenza A virus. Whether geogenic dust PM also exacerbates respiratory bacterial infection is not yet known, nor are the components of the dust that drive these responses. We treated airway bronchial epithelial cells (NuLi-1) with UV-irradiated geogenic dust PM from six remote Western Australian towns. High levels of IL-6 and IL-8 production were observed, as well as persistent microbial growth. 16 S rRNA sequencing of the growth identified the microbe as Bacillus licheniformis, a spore-forming, environmentally abundant bacterium. We next investigated the interaction of B. licheniformis with respiratory epithelium in vitro to determine whether this exacerbated infection with a bacterial respiratory pathogen (non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, NTHi). Heat treatment (100 °C) of all PM samples eliminated B. licheniformis contamination and reduced epithelial inflammatory responses, suggesting that heat-labile and/or microbial factors were involved in the host response to geogenic dust PM . We then exposed NuLi-1 epithelium to increasing doses of the isolated Bacillus licheniformis (multiplicity of infection of 10:1, 1:1 or 0.1:1 bacteria: cells) for 1, 3, and 24 h. B. licheniformis and NTHi infection (association and invasion) was assessed using a standard gentamicin survival assay, and epithelial release of IL-6 and IL-8 was measured using a bead based immunoassay. B. licheniformis was cytotoxic to NuLi-1 cells at 24 h. At 3 h post-challenge, B. licheniformis elicited high IL-6 and IL-8 inflammatory responses from NuLi-1 cells compared with cells treated with heat-treated geogenic dust PM (p < 0.0001). Whilst treatment of cells with B. licheniformis increased inflammation, this did not make the cells more susceptible to NTHi infection. This study highlights that geogenic dust PM can harbour viable bacterial spores that induce inflammation in respiratory epithelium. The impact on respiratory health from inhalation of bacterial spores in PM in arid environments may be underestimated. Further investigation into the contribution of B. licheniformis and the wider dust microbiome to respiratory infection is warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29522908
[Au] Autor:Melamed IR; Borte M; Trawnicek L; Kobayashi AL; Kobayashi RH; Knutsen A; Gupta S; Smits W; Pituch-Noworolska A; Strach M; Pulka G; Ochs HD; Moy JN
[Ad] Address:IMMUNOe Research Center, 6801 S. Yosemite street, Centennial, CO 80112, USA. Electronic address: melamedi@immunoe.com.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacokinetics of a novel human intravenous immunoglobulin 10% in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases: Analysis of a phase III, multicentre, prospective, open-label study.
[So] Source:Eur J Pharm Sci;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy is commonly used to treat patients with primary antibody deficiency. This prospective, open-label, non-randomised, multicentre, phase III trial investigated the pharmacokinetics of a new 10% liquid IVIG product (panzyga®; Octapharma) in 51 patients aged 2-75 years with common variable immunodeficiency (n = 43) or X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (n = 8). Patients were treated with IVIG 10% every 3 (n = 21) or 4 weeks (n = 30) at a dose of 200-800 mg/kg for 12 months. Total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and subclass concentrations approximately doubled from pre- to 15 min post-infusion. The maximum concentration of total IgG (mean ±â€¯SD) was 21.82 ±â€¯5.83 g/L in patients treated 3-weekly and 17.42 ±â€¯3.34 g/L in patients treated 4-weekly. Median trough IgG concentrations were nearly constant over the course of the study, remaining between 11.0 and 12.2 g/L for patients on the 3-week schedule and between 8.10 and 8.65 g/L for patients on the 4-week schedule. The median terminal half-life of total IgG was 36.1 (range 18.5-65.9) days, with generally similar values for the IgG subclasses (26.7-38.0 days). Median half-lives for specific antibodies ranged between 21.3 and 51.2 days for anti-cytomegalovirus, anti-Haemophilus influenzae, anti-measles, anti-tetanus toxoid, anti-varicella zoster virus antibodies, and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae subtype antibodies. Overall, IVIG 10% demonstrated pharmacokinetic properties similar to those of other commercial IVIG 10% preparations and 3- or 4-weekly administration achieved sufficient concentrations of IgG, IgG subclasses, and specific antibodies, exceeding the recommended level needed to effectively prevent serious bacterial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29402475
[Au] Autor:Vandroux D; Allou N; Jabot J; Li Pat Yuen G; Brottet E; Roquebert B; Martinet O
[Ad] Address:Service de réanimation polyvalente, hôpital Félix-Guyon, CHU La-Réunion, allée des topazes, CS11021, 97400 Saint-Denis-de-La-Réunion, France; CHU La-Réunion, Inserm, CIC 1410, 97410 Saint-Pierre, France. Electronic address: vandroux.david@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Intensive care admission for Coronavirus OC43 respiratory tract infections.
[So] Source:Med Mal Infect;48(2):141-144, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1769-6690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Coronavirus OC43 infection causes severe pneumonia in patients presenting with comorbidities, but clinical signs alone do not allow for viral identification. OBJECTIVES: To analyze acute manifestations of Coronavirus OC43 infections and outcomes of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective and monocentric study performed during a Coronavirus OC43 outbreak. We used multiplex PCR to detect an OC43 outbreak in Reunion Island during the 2016 Southern Hemisphere's winter: seven admissions to the ICU. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was 71 [67;76] years, SAPS II was 42 [28;53], pneumonia severity index 159 [139;182] vs 73 [40.5;107] for patients in medical wards, and 43% required mechanical ventilation. Comorbidities were diabetes mellitus (87%), chronic respiratory failure (57%), and chronic renal failure (29%). One patient died from Haemophilus influenzae co-infection. CONCLUSION: As for MERS Co-V infections, underlying comorbidities impacted the clinical outcomes of OC43 infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29315536
[Au] Autor:Anderson S; Harper LM; Dionne-Odom J; Halle-Ekane G; Tita ATN
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Women's Reproductive Health, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
[Ti] Title:A decision analytic model for prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in Sub-Saharan Africa using birth-dose vaccination.
[So] Source:Int J Gynaecol Obstet;141(1):126-132, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3479
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To compare prenatal maternal hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening and infant vaccination strategies to inform policy on HBV prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: A decision analytic model was created using previously published data to assess the ability of three intervention strategies to prevent HBV infection by age 10 years. Strategy 1 comprised of universal vaccination with a pentavalent vaccine (HBV, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae) at age 6 weeks. Strategy 2 comprised of universal HBV vaccine at birth plus pentavalent vaccine. Strategy 3 comprised of maternal prenatal HBV screening and targeted HBV vaccine at birth for all exposed infants plus pentavalent vaccine. The reference strategy provided neither maternal screening nor infant vaccination. Rates of HBV infection and costs were compared. RESULTS: The reference strategy had an HBV infection rate of 2360 per 10 000 children. The HBV infection rate for strategy 1 was 813 per 10 000 children vaccinated (1547 cases prevented). Strategies 2 and 3 prevented an additional 384 cases and 362 cases, respectively. Inclusion of HBV vaccination at birth was the preferred approach at a willingness-to-pay threshold of US$150. CONCLUSION: Including a birth-dose HBV vaccine in the standard schedule was both cost-effective and prevented additional infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/ijgo.12434

  5 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28449972
[Au] Autor:Sil A; Ravi MD; Patnaik BN; Dhingra MS; Dupuy M; Gandhi DJ; Dhaded SM; Dubey AP; Kundu R; Lalwani SK; Chhatwal J; Mathew LG; Gupta M; Sharma SD; Bavdekar SB; Rout SP; Jayanth MV; D'Cor NA; Mangarule SA; Ravinuthala S; Reddy E J
[Ad] Address:Shantha Biotechnics Private Limited - A Sanofi Company, Hyderabad, India. Electronic address: arijit.sil@sanofi.com.
[Ti] Title:Effect of prophylactic or therapeutic administration of paracetamol on immune response to DTwP-HepB-Hib combination vaccine in Indian infants.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(22):2999-3006, 2017 05 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vaccination is considered as the most cost effective method for preventing infectious diseases. Low grade fever is a known adverse effect of vaccination. In India, it is a common clinical practice to prescribe paracetamol either prophylactically or therapeutically to manage fever. Some studies have shown that paracetamol interferes with antibody responses following immunization. This manuscript reports the outcome of a post hoc analysis of data from a clinical trial of a pentavalent vaccine in Indian infants where paracetamol was not used or was used either as prophylaxis or for treatment of fever. METHODS: Pre and post vaccine antibody levels against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type B were assessed in no paracetamol and paracetamol groups. The paracetamol group was further divided into prophylactic and treatment groups. RESULTS: Similar rates of seroprotection/seroresponse for anti-D, anti-T, anti-wP, anti-PT, anti-HBs and anti-PRP were observed in all the groups. There was no clear tendency for difference in percentage seroprotection/seroresponse and geometric mean (GM) titers in any of the groups. CONCLUSION: The study found no evidence that paracetamol usage either as prophylactic or for treatment impact immunological responses to DTwP-HepB-Hib combination vaccine. [Clinical trial registry of India (study registration number CTRI/2012/08/002872)].
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acetaminophen/therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/administration & dosage
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/immunology
Haemophilus Vaccines/administration & dosage
Haemophilus Vaccines/immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines/administration & dosage
Hepatitis B Vaccines/immunology
Immunity, Humoral/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetaminophen/administration & dosage
Acetaminophen/adverse effects
Diphtheria/immunology
Diphtheria/prevention & control
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/adverse effects
Female
Fever/drug therapy
Fever/etiology
Fever/prevention & control
Haemophilus Infections/ethnology
Haemophilus Infections/immunology
Haemophilus Infections/prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines/adverse effects
Hepatitis B/immunology
Hepatitis B/prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies/blood
Hepatitis B Vaccines/adverse effects
Humans
India
Infant
Male
Tetanus/immunology
Tetanus/prevention & control
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate/immunology
Whooping Cough/immunology
Whooping Cough/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine); 0 (DtwP-HepB-Hib vaccine); 0 (Haemophilus Vaccines); 0 (Hepatitis B Antibodies); 0 (Hepatitis B Vaccines); 0 (Vaccines, Conjugate); 362O9ITL9D (Acetaminophen)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390149
[Au] Autor:Malhotra I; LaBeaud AD; Morris N; McKibben M; Mungai P; Muchiri E; King CL; King CH
[Ad] Address:Case Western Reserve University, Center for Global Health and Diseases, Cleveland, OH, United States.
[Ti] Title:Cord Blood Anti-Parasite IL-10 as Risk Marker for Compromised Vaccine Immunogenicity in Early Childhood.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Antenatal exposure to parasites can affect infants' subsequent responses to vaccination. The present study investigated how maternal prenatal infections and newborns' anti-parasite cytokine profiles relate to IgG responses to standard vaccination during infancy. Methods: 450 Kenyan women were tested for parasitic infections during pregnancy. Their newborns' responses to malaria, schistosome, and filaria antigens were assessed in cord blood (CB) lymphocytes. Following standard neonatal vaccination, this infant cohort was followed biannually to age 30 months for circulating IgG levels against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), diphtheria toxoid (DT), hepatitis B, and tetanus. Results: Trajectories of post-vaccination IgG levels were classified by functional principal component (PC) analysis to assess each child's response profile. Two main components, PC1, reflecting height of response over time, and PC2, reflecting crossover from high to low or low to high, were identified. CB cytokine responses to schistosome and filarial antigens showed a significant association between augmented anti-helminth IL-10 and reduced antibody levels, particularly to DT and hepatitis B, and a more rapid post-vaccination decline in circulating IgG against Hib. Conclusion: Antenatal sensitization to schistosomiasis or filariasis, and related production of anti-parasite IL-10 at birth, are associated with reduced anti-vaccine IgG levels in infancy, with possibly impaired protection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jiy047

  7 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29349940
[Au] Autor:Rhie K; Choi EH; Cho EY; Lee J; Kang JH; Kim DS; Kim YJ; Ahn Y; Eun BW; Oh SH; Cha SH; Hong YJ; Kim KN; Kim NH; Kim YK; Kim JH; Lee T; Kim HM; Lee KS; Kim CS; Park SE; Kim YM; Oh CE; Ma SH; Jo DS; Choi YY; Lee HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Children's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Etiology of Invasive Bacterial Infections in Immunocompetent Children in Korea (2006-2010): a Retrospective Multicenter Study.
[So] Source:J Korean Med Sci;33(6):e45, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1598-6357
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Invasive bacterial infections in apparently immunocompetent children were retrospectively analyzed to figure causative bacterial organisms in Korea. METHODS: A total of 947 cases from 25 university hospitals were identified from 2006 to 2010 as a continuance of a previous 10-year period study from 1996 to 2005. RESULTS: Escherichia coli (41.3%), Streptococcus agalactiae (27.7%), and Staphylococcus aureus (27.1%) were the most common pathogens in infants < 3 months of age. S. agalactiae was the most prevalent cause of meningitis and pneumonia and E. coli was the major cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. In children 3 to 59 months of age, Streptococcus pneumoniae (54.2%), S. aureus (20.5%), and Salmonella spp. (14.4%) were the most common pathogens. S. pneumoniae was the leading cause of pneumonia (86.0%), meningitis (65.0%), and bacteremia without localizing signs (49.0%) in this group. In children ≥ 5 years of age, S. aureus (62.8%) was the predominant pathogen, followed by Salmonella species (12.4%) and S. pneumoniae (11.5%). Salmonella species (43.0%) was the most common cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. The relative proportion of S. aureus increased significantly over the 15-year period (1996-2010) in children ≥ 3 months of age (P < 0.001), while that of Haemophilus influenzae decreased significantly in both < 3 months of age group (P = 0.036) and ≥ 3 months of age groups (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: S. agalactiae, E. coli, S. pneumoniae, and S. aureus are common etiologic agents of invasive bacterial infections in Korean children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e45

  8 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29293990
[Au] Autor:Stewart CJ; Hasegawa K; Wong MC; Ajami NJ; Petrosino JF; Piedra PA; Espinola JA; Tierney CN; Camargo CA; Mansbach JM
[Ad] Address:Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
[Ti] Title:Respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis are associated with distinct metabolic pathways.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;, 2017 Dec 25.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Bronchiolitis, the leading cause of US infant hospitalizations, is most commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) followed by rhinovirus (RV). Conventional perception is that bronchiolitis is a single entity, albeit with different viral etiologies and degrees of severity. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of nasopharyngeal aspirates from 106 infants hospitalized with either RSV-only (n=80) or RV-only (n=26) bronchiolitis. We performed metabolomics analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on all samples, and metagenomic sequencing on 58 of the 106 samples. Results: Infants with RSV-only and RV-only infections had significantly different nasopharyngeal metabolome profiles (P<0.001) and bacterial metagenome profiles (P<0.05). RSV-only was associated with metabolites from a range of pathways and a microbiome dominated by Streptococcus pneumoniae. By contrast, RV-only was associated with increased essential and non-essential N-acetyl amino acids and high relative abundance of Haemophilus influenzae. These co-occurring species were associated with driving the bacterially-derived metabolic pathways. Multi-omic analysis showed that both the virus and the microbiome were significantly associated with the metabolic function in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis. Conclusion: Although study replication is necessary, these results highlight that bronchiolitis is not a uniform disease between RSV and RV infections, a result with future implications for prevention and treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix680

  9 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27774610
[Au] Autor:Lee S; Kim HW; Kim KH
[Ad] Address:Center for Vaccine Evaluation and Study, Medical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Functional antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae type B, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae contained in intravenous immunoglobulin products.
[So] Source:Transfusion;57(1):157-165, 2017 01.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) replacement therapy is used to prevent invasive infections in patients with primary antibody deficiency (PAD). However, few studies have functionally evaluated specific antibodies against encapsulated bacteria that cause invasive infection in patients with PAD. In this study, functional antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci), and Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) in IVIG therapy were evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen lots of IVIG products prepared by two Korean manufacturers (Products A and B) were evaluated. The functional antibodies were measured by serum bactericidal assay for Hib and four meningococcal serogroups and by multiplexed opsonophagocytic assay for 26 pneumococcal serotypes. The estimated trough levels of antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus were calculated to determine whether the usual IVIG dose is appropriate for protecting patients with PAD. RESULTS: The functional antibody levels for Hib were similar in all of the IVIG products. In contrast, serum bacterial indices of meningococcal serogroups A and Y showed significant differences between products A and B. Opsonic indices to pneumococci varied depending on the serotype in each IVIG product. The estimated trough levels of antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus exceeded the protective levels in most of the IVIG products except for the antibodies against two pneumococcal serotypes. CONCLUSION: Most of the tested commercial IVIG products had sufficient functional antibodies against Hib, pneumococcus, and meningococcus to protect patients with PAD receiving IVIG treatment. Regular and continuous evaluation of IVIG products is necessary to maintain an optimal therapeutic effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology
Haemophilus influenzae type b/immunology
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/immunology
Neisseria meningitidis/immunology
Streptococcus pneumoniae/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Republic of Korea
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.13869

  10 / 15417 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29460728
[Au] Autor:Månsson V; Gilsdorf JR; Kahlmeter G; Kilian M; Kroll JS; Riesbeck K; Resman F
[Ti] Title:Capsule Typing of Haemophilus influenzae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry .
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(3):443-452, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains belong to type-specific genetic lineages. Reliable capsule typing requires PCR, but a more efficient method would be useful. We evaluated capsule typing by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Isolates of all capsule types (a-f and nontypeable; n = 258) and isogenic capsule transformants (types a-d) were investigated. Principal component and biomarker analyses of mass spectra showed clustering, and mass peaks correlated with capsule type-specific genetic lineages. We used 31 selected isolates to construct a capsule typing database. Validation with the remaining isolates (n = 227) showed 100% sensitivity and 92.2% specificity for encapsulated strains (a-f; n = 61). Blinded validation of a supplemented database (n = 50) using clinical isolates (n = 126) showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for encapsulated strains (b, e, and f; n = 28). MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is an accurate method for capsule typing of H. influenzae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2403.170459


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