Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hamelia [Words]
References found : 28 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 3 go to page          

  1 / 28 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29334246
[Au] Autor:Silva-Mares D; Rivas-Galindo VM; Salazar-Aranda R; Pérez-Lopez LA; Waksman De Torres N; Pérez-Meseguer J; Torres-Lopez E
[Ad] Address:a Facultad de Medicina, Departmento de Química Analítica y , Universidad Autónoma Nuevo León , San Nicolas de los Garza , México.
[Ti] Title:Screening of north-east Mexico medicinal plants with activities against herpes simplex virus and human cancer cell line.
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-4, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The plants examined in this study have previous biological activity reports indicating the possibility of found activity against herpes and cancer cell. The aim of this contribution was to carry out a screening of Juglans mollis (Juglandaceae), Persea americana (Lauraceae), Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae), Salvia texana (Lamiaceae), Salvia ballotaeflora (Lamiaceae), Ceanothus coeruleus (Rhamnaceae), Chrysactinia mexicana (Asteraceae) y Clematis drummondii (Ranunculaceae), against HeLa cells, VHS-1 and VHS-2. The method MTT was used to determine the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC ), in Vero and HeLa cell lines. To determine the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC ) against herpes, the plaque reduction method was used. Results showed that none of the plants exhibited activity against HeLa cells. About antiherpetic activity, J. mollis and S. ballotaeflora extracts present antiherpetic activity in terms of their SI, increasingly interest for further studies on the isolation of compounds with antiherpetic activity and about the mechanisms of action that produce this activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180115
[Lr] Last revision date:180115
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2017.1423300

  2 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29246664
[Au] Autor:Paz JEW; Contreras CR; Munguía AR; Aguilar CN; Inungaray MLC
[Ad] Address:Tecnológico Nacional de México, Instituto Tecnológico de Ciudad Valles, Departamento de Ingeniería, Ciudad Valles, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Phenolic content and antibacterial activity of extracts of Hamelia patens obtained by different extraction methods.
[So] Source:Braz J Microbiol;, 2017 Dec 06.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4405
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hamelia patens, is a plant traditionally used to treat a variety of conditions among the Huastec people of Mexico. The objective of this study is to characterize the phenolic content and critically examine the antimicrobial activity of leaf extracts H. patens, obtained by maceration, Soxhlet and percolation, using ethanol as 70% solvent. Phenolic compounds are characterized by liquid chromatography, coupled to a High Resolution Mass Spectrometry, and the antimicrobial activity was studied from the inhibitory effect of each extract for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and S. paratyphi, and by the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration, the percentage of activity and the Index of Bacterial Susceptibility of each extract. The phenolic compound identified in different concentrations in the three extracts was epicatechin. The extracts obtained by the three methods had antimicrobial activity, however, there was no significant difference (p<0.05) between the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of the extracts obtained by maceration, percolation and Soxhlet. The results of this study contribute to the body of knowledge on the use of extracts in controlling microorganisms with natural antimicrobials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171216
[Lr] Last revision date:171216
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28331486
[Au] Autor:Yue L; Twell D; Kuang Y; Liao J; Zhou X
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhou, China; College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Corrigendum: Transcriptome Analysis of (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development.
[So] Source:Front Plant Sci;8:369, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-462X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:[This corrects the article on p. 1991 in vol. 7, PMID: 28119704.].
[Pt] Publication type:PUBLISHED ERRATUM
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fpls.2017.00369

  4 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28179114
[Au] Autor:Giovannini P; Howes MR
[Ad] Address:Natural Capital and Plant Health Department, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, West Sussex RH17 6TN, UK. Electronic address: P.Giovannini@kew.org.
[Ti] Title:Medicinal plants used to treat snakebite in Central America: Review and assessment of scientific evidence.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;199:240-256, 2017 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Every year between 1.2 and 5.5 million people worldwide are victims of snakebites, with about 400,000 left permanently injured. In Central America an estimated 5500 snakebite cases are reported by health centres, but this is likely to be an underestimate due to unreported cases in rural regions. The aim of this study is to review the medicinal plants used traditionally to treat snakebites in seven Central American countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A literature search was performed on published primary data on medicinal plants of Central America and those specifically pertaining to use against snakebites. Plant use reports for traditional snakebite remedies identified in primary sources were extracted and entered in a database, with data analysed in terms of the most frequent numbers of use reports. The scientific evidence that might support the local uses of the most frequently reported species was also examined. RESULTS: A total of 260 independent plant use reports were recorded in the 34 sources included in this review, encompassing 208 species used to treat snakebite in Central America. Only nine species were reported in at least three studies: Cissampelos pareira L., Piper amalago L., Aristolochia trilobata L., Sansevieria hyacinthoides (L.) Druce, Strychnos panamensis Seem., Dorstenia contrajerva L., Scoparia dulcis L., Hamelia patens Jacq., and Simaba cedron Planch. Genera with the highest number of species used to treat snakebite were Piper, Aristolochia, Hamelia, Ipomoea, Passiflora and Peperomia. The extent of the scientific evidence available to understand any pharmacological basis for their use against snakebites varied between different plant species. CONCLUSION: At least 208 plant species are traditionally used to treat snakebite in Central America but there is a lack of clinical research to evaluate their efficacy and safety. Available pharmacological data suggest different plant species may target different symptoms of snakebites, such as pain or anxiety, although more studies are needed to further evaluate the scientific basis for their use.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Medicine, Traditional/methods
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Snake Bites/drug therapy
Snake Bites/ethnology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Central America/ethnology
Humans
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plant Preparations/isolation & purification
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Snake Bites/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170210
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28119704
[Au] Autor:Yue L; Twell D; Kuang Y; Liao J; Zhou X
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of SciencesGuangzhou, China; College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptome Analysis of (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development.
[So] Source:Front Plant Sci;7:1991, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1664-462X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fpls.2016.01991

  6 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27526337
[Au] Autor:Liu W; Luo Y; Wang L; Luo T; Peng Y; Wu L
[Ad] Address:School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510641, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: mewyliu@scut.edu.cn.
[Ti] Title:Water transport in leaf vein systems and the flow velocity measurement with a new method.
[So] Source:J Plant Physiol;204:74-84, 2016 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:1618-1328
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As an exploration to the nature, research about plants' physiological properties have never been suspended. Water transport in leaf vein systems is an essential part of plant growth and development. In this paper, a simple but efficient method combined the fluorescence labeling technology frequently used in bioresearch and the image-processing technology in the computer realm was developed to measure the flow velocity, which was used as a quantitative description to reveal the regulation of water transport in leaf vein systems. Three ordinary species of plants were selected for the experiments and the influence of the experimental conditions, such as the concentration of fluorescein and illumination intensity of LEDs, was investigated. Differences among the flow velocities of different leaf veins of the same leaf as well as the flow velocities of different species were shown in bar charts. The mean measured flow velocities of the midrib and secondary vein of Ficus virens Ait. var. sublanceolata (Miq.) Corner were 4.549m/h and 3.174m/h. As for Plumeria rubra L. cv. Acutifolia and Hamelia patens, that were 0.339m/h and 0.463m/h, 2.609m/h and 2.586m/h, respectively. With the algorithm developed in this paper, the variation of the flow velocity in leaf veins was investigated by setting a constant time interval. Then a verification of the flow velocity measured by the algorithm was performed. Finally, according to the natural conditions of a plant leaf, a simulation about the water transport in leaf vein systems was carried out, which is especially different from the previous research.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Plant Leaves/physiology
Plant Vascular Bundle/metabolism
Rheology/methods
Water/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biological Transport
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Plant Leaves/anatomy & histology
Plants/anatomy & histology
Reproducibility of Results
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170410
[Lr] Last revision date:170410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160816
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 27005511
[Au] Autor:Perez-Meseguer J; Delgado-Montemayor C; Ortíz-Torres T; Salazar-Aranda R; Cordero-Perez P; de Torres NW
[Ad] Address:Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Medicina. Av. Fancisco I. Madero y Dr Aguirre Pequeño S/N. Col Mitras Centro. CP 64460. Monterrey, NL. México.
[Ti] Title:Antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of Hamelia patens extracts.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;29(1 Suppl):343-8, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hamelia patens is widely used in the traditional medicine of Mexico and Central America for the treatment of illnesses associated with inflammatory processes. In this study, antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity were assayed on the methanolic crude (ME), hexane (HE), ethyl acetate (AE), and butanol (BE) extracts of H. patens. The total phenolic content (TPC) as mg of gallic acid equivalents per g of dry extract was determined by Folin-Ciocalteu's method (ME=141.58±11.99, HE=33.96±1.13, AE=375.18±13.09, BE=132.08±3.62), and antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging method (EC(50) ME=77.87±5.67, HE=236.64±26.32, AE=45.87±2.24, BE=50.97±0.85µg/mL). Hepatoprotective activity was evaluated through AST activity on HepG2 cells subjected to damage with CCl(4) (ME=62.5±3.41, HE=72.25±2.87, AE=63.50±4.20, BE=43.74±4.03). BE showed the greater hepatoprotective activity and a good antioxidant capacity, while HE did not show hepatoprotective or antioxidant activity. Cytotoxicity was evaluated on Vero cells cultures; none showed significant toxicity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antioxidants/pharmacology
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/prevention & control
Hamelia/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Aspartate Aminotransferases/analysis
Biphenyl Compounds
Carbon Tetrachloride Poisoning/pathology
Carbon Tetrachloride Poisoning/prevention & control
Cell Line
Cercopithecus aethiops
Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology
Humans
Phenols/analysis
Picrates
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Polyphenols/chemistry
Polyphenols/pharmacology
Vero Cells
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Biphenyl Compounds); 0 (Free Radical Scavengers); 0 (Phenols); 0 (Picrates); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Polyphenols); DFD3H4VGDH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl); EC 2.6.1.1 (Aspartate Aminotransferases)
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 161126
[Lr] Last revision date:161126
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160324
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26924564
[Au] Autor:Giovannini P; Howes MJ; Edwards SE
[Ad] Address:Natural Capital and Plant Health Department, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, West Sussex RH17 6TN, United Kingdom; Centre for Biocultural Diversity, School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR, United Kingdom. Electronic address: peter.giovannini@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: A review.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;184:58-71, 2016 May 26.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Globally 387 million people currently have diabetes and it is projected that this condition will be the 7th leading cause of death worldwide by 2030. As of 2012, its total prevalence in Central America (8.5%) was greater than the prevalence in most Latin American countries and the population of this region widely use herbal medicine. The aim of this study is to review the medicinal plants used to treat diabetes and its sequelae in seven Central American countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a literature review and extracted from primary sources the plant use reports in traditional remedies that matched one of the following disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunctions, visual loss, and nerve damage. Use reports were entered in a database and data were analysed in terms of the highest number of use reports for diabetes management and for the different sequelae. We also examined the scientific evidence that might support the local uses of the most reported species. RESULTS: Out of 535 identified species used to manage diabetes and its sequelae, 104 species are used to manage diabetes and we found in vitro and in vivo preclinical experimental evidence of hypoglycaemic effect for 16 of the 20 species reported by at least two sources. However, only seven of these species are reported in more than 3 studies: Momordica charantia L., Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br. ex Cass., Tecoma stans (L.) Juss. ex Kunth, Persea americana Mill., Psidium guajava L., Anacardium occidentale L. and Hamelia patens Jacq. Several of the species that are used to manage diabetes in Central America are also used to treat conditions that may arise as its consequence such as kidney disease, urinary problems and skin conditions. CONCLUSION: This review provides an overview of the medicinal plants used to manage diabetes and its sequelae in Central America and of the current scientific knowledge that might explain their traditional use. In Central America a large number of medicinal plants are used to treat this condition and its sequelae, although relatively few species are widely used across the region. For the species used to manage diabetes, there is variation in the availability and quality of pharmacological, chemical and clinical studies to explain traditional use.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy
Plants, Medicinal
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Central America
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use
Medicine, Traditional
Phytotherapy
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Hypoglycemic Agents); 0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170106
[Lr] Last revision date:170106
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160301
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26731099
[Au] Autor:Jiménez-Suárez V; Nieto-Camacho A; Jiménez-Estrada M; Alvarado Sánchez B
[Ad] Address:a Unidad Académica Multidisciplinaria Zona Huasteca, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí , S.L.P , México ;
[Ti] Title:Anti-inflammatory, free radical scavenging and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities of Hamelia patens and its chemical constituents.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;54(9):1822-30, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae) is traditionally used to treat wounds, inflammation and diabetes. However, there is still a lack of scientific evidence to support these applications. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of Hamelia patens, and identify its bioactive compounds. Materials and methods Four extracts were obtained by maceration and liquid-liquid extraction: HEX, DCM-EtOAc, MeOH-EtOAc and MeOH-Aq. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated orally on rat paw carrageenan-induced oedema over 6 h (50, 200 and 500 mg/kg), and topically in mouse ear oedema induced by 12-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) after 4 h (0.5 and 1 mg/ear). We also evaluated myeloperoxidase levels in ear tissue, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging ability, and in vitro α-glucosidase inhibition. The chemical compounds were separated by column chromatography and identified by spectroscopic analysis. Results We found that the oral administration of the HEX extract at 500 and 200 mg/kg significantly decreased the carrageenan-induced inflammation after 1 and 3 h, respectively. The MeOH-EtOAc extract significantly inhibited myeloperoxidase activity (83.5%), followed by the DCM-EtOAc extract (76%), ß-sitosterol/stigmasterol (72.7%) and the HEX extract (55%), which significantly decreased oedema induced by TPA at both doses, giving a similar effect to indomethacin. We also found that the MeOH-EtOAc, MeOH-Aq and DCM-EtOAc extracts showed good DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 values of 18.6, 93.9 and 158.2 µg/mL, respectively). The HEX extract showed the lowest α-glucosidase inhibition (an IC50 value of 26.07 µg/mL), followed by the MeOH-EtOAc extract (an IC50 value of 30.18 µg/mL), ß-sitosterol/stigmasterol (IC50 34.6 µg/mL) and compound A ((6E,10E,14E,18E)-2,6,10,14,18,23-hexamethyl-2,6,10,14,18,22-tetracosahexaene, an IC50 value of 114.6 µg/mL), which were isolated for the first time from Hamelia patens. Discussion and conclusion Hamelia patens possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, which support its traditional use. These effects can be attributed to the identified compounds.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology
Edema/prevention & control
Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology
Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/pharmacology
Hamelia
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification
Biphenyl Compounds/chemistry
Carrageenan
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Edema/chemically induced
Edema/metabolism
Female
Free Radical Scavengers/isolation & purification
Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors/isolation & purification
Hamelia/chemistry
Peroxidase/metabolism
Phytotherapy
Picrates/chemistry
Plant Leaves
Plants, Medicinal
Rats, Wistar
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism
Solvents/chemistry
Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Time Factors
alpha-Glucosidases/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Biphenyl Compounds); 0 (Free Radical Scavengers); 0 (Glycoside Hydrolase Inhibitors); 0 (Picrates); 0 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins); 0 (Solvents); 9000-07-1 (Carrageenan); DFD3H4VGDH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl); EC 1.11.1.7 (Peroxidase); EC 3.2.1.20 (alpha-Glucosidases); NI40JAQ945 (Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170213
[Lr] Last revision date:170213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3109/13880209.2015.1129544

  10 / 28 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25460591
[Au] Autor:Cruz EC; Andrade-Cetto A
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Etnofarmacología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México DF, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Ethnopharmacological field study of the plants used to treat type 2 diabetes among the Cakchiquels in Guatemala.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;159:238-44, 2015 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Type 2 diabetes is characterized by tissue resistance to the action of insulin, combined with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. In Guatemala, type 2 diabetes results in significant mortality rates. The low incomes of the indigenous population results in the use of alternative therapies such as medicinal plants to treat the illness. We could not find any previous study related to the use of medicinal plants to treat diabetes in Guatemala. The aim of this work is to determine the most effective plant species used in traditional medicine to treat type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed an ethnopharmacological field study among the Cakchiquels of Chimaltenango to select the most prominent plants used to treat the disease. Type 2 diabetic patients from their community health centers were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Two mathematical tools were used to identify potential plant species: the Disease Consensus Index and the Use Value. International databases, including SCOPUS, PubMed, and Google Scholar, were used to identify whether the plants with the highest scores were known to elicit hypoglycemic effects. RESULTS: After analyzing the data, we can propose the following plants as the most prominent among the Cakchiquels of Chimaltenango to treat type 2 diabetes: Hamelia patens Jacq., Neurolaena lobata (L.) R.Br.ex Cass., Solanum americanum Mill., Croton guatemalensis Lotsy, and Quercus peduncularis Née. CONCLUSIONS: The Cakchiquel patients interviewed did not understand type 2 diabetes; however, they associated the onset of their disease with a negative emotion, such as shock, sadness or anger. Despite changes in lifestyle, influences of advertising, the availability of innovative treatments and the use of oral hypoglycemic treatments provided by health facilities serving indigenous communities, the Cakchiquel continue to use medicinal plants as adjunctive treatment. While they are unaware whether the plants can cause additional harm, they consider their consumption beneficial because they feel better. There were 11 plants identified with UVs greater than 0.5 and high DCIs; from these 64% of the plants have been identified as having hypoglycemic effects; this finding supports the traditional selection by the Cakchiquels of medicinal plants to treat T2D.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy
Phytotherapy
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Ethnopharmacology
Female
Guatemala
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1509
[Cu] Class update date: 151119
[Lr] Last revision date:151119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141203
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 3 go to page          
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information