Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Heart and Neoplasms [Words]
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[PMID]: 29505531
[Au] Autor:Li Y; Ye T; Gu Q; Dong L; Chen G; Lu S
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University.
[Ti] Title:Primary, cardiac, fibroblastic osteosarcoma: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9543, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Primary cardiac osteosarcoma is a rare tumor. To our knowledge, only 15 cases have been reported in the literature in the past 10 years. We describe a case of primary, cardiac, fibroblastic osteosarcoma in a 42-year-old woman. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 42-year-old woman with a 10-day history of chest pain. Intraoperatively, a mass was found originating from the ostium of the left inferior pulmonary vein in the left atrium, extending to the mitral orifice. Histologically, the tumor contained variable amounts of spindle cells and osseous differentiation in different areas. Primary, cardiac fibroblastic osteosarcoma had the typical appearance of interlacing hyperchromatic spindle-shaped stromal cells associated with osseous matrix. DIAGNOSES: According to the clinicopathological features, diagnosis of primary, cardiac fibroblastic osteosarcoma was made. INTERVENTIONS: Wide surgical excision of the mass was performed. OUTCOMES: Three months after the operation, transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a 3.2 cm × 2 cm recurrent mass in the wall of the left atrium (LA). She died shortly afterwards as a result of the local disease recurrence. LESSONS: In this report, we describe a rare case of primary, cardiac fibroblastic osteosarcoma, and findings are helpful for the pathologists would like to further identify the clinicopathological features of this rare tumor.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Heart Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Myocardium/pathology
Osteosarcoma/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Fatal Outcome
Female
Heart Neoplasms/pathology
Humans
Osteosarcoma/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009543

  2 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28749044
[Au] Autor:Li X; Fu Y; Miao J; Li H; Hu B
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy after percutaneous coronary intervention in lung cancer patients with concomitant coronary heart disease.
[So] Source:Thorac Cancer;8(5):477-481, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1759-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In recent years, based on clinical observations, the number of lung cancer patients with concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) has gradually increased. However, because of the requirement of long-term anticoagulant therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), some of these patients lose the opportunity for surgical treatment, resulting in tumor progression. The objective of this study was to determine the appropriate timing of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy after PCI without increasing perioperative cardiovascular risk. METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzed clinical data of patients with a combination of NSCLC and CHD who underwent selective pulmonary lobectomy by VATS in the early postoperative PCI period between 2010 and 2015 at Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, China. RESULTS: Fourteen patients received VATS lobectomy after PCI. The disease had progressed to T stage in two patients after PCI. No perioperative death occurred. Two patients suffered postoperative atrial fibrillation: one had a pulmonary infection, and the other had acute coronary syndrome. All patients recovered and were discharged. CONCLUSION: For NSCLC patients with severe CHD, the use of VATS lobectomy in the early postoperative PCI period could not only advance the timing of surgery, but may also control perioperative hemorrhage and CHD event risks within acceptable ranges, which could provide more patients with an opportunity to undergo surgical treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery
Coronary Disease/surgery
Lung Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Pneumonectomy/methods
Retrospective Studies
Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1759-7714.12471

  3 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29228125
[Au] Autor:Wu B; Ingersoll K; Jug R; Yang LH; Luedke C; Lo A; Su P; Liu X; Rehder C; Gong J; Lu CM; Wang E
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Shengjing Hospital affiliated to China Medical University, Shenyang, China.
[Ti] Title:Myeloid Neoplasms Following Solid Organ Transplantation: Clinicopathologic Studies of 23 Cases.
[So] Source:Am J Clin Pathol;149(1):55-66, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1943-7722
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives: Myeloid neoplasms (MNs) after solid organ transplant are rare, and their clinicopathologic features have not been well characterized. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 23 such cases. Results: The ages ranged from 2 to 76 years, with a median of 59 years at the diagnosis. The median interval between the transplant and diagnosis was 56 months (range, 8-384 months). The transplanted organs included liver in five, kidney in six, lung in five, heart in six, and heart/lung in one case(s). The types of MN included acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 12, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in five, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in four, and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in two cases. Cytogenetics demonstrated clonal abnormalities in 18 (78.3%) cases, including unbalanced changes in 10 (55.6%), Philadelphia chromosome in four (22.2%), and other balanced aberrations in four (22.2%) cases. Thirteen (56.5%) patients died, with an estimated median survival of 9 months. With disease stratification, AML and MDS have short median survivals (3.5 and 7 months, respectively), with an initial precipitous decline of the survival curve. Conclusions: Posttransplant MNs have a latency period between that seen in AML/MDS related to alkylators and that associated with topoisomerase II inhibitors. The cytogenetic profile suggests a mutagenic effect on leukemogenesis. The clinical outcome for AML/MDS is dismal, with death occurring at an early phase of treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ajcp/aqx133

  4 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28453703
[Au] Autor:Guberina M; Eberhardt W; Stuschke M; Gauler T; Heinzelmann F; Cheufou D; Kimmich M; Friedel G; Schmidberger H; Darwiche K; Jendrossek V; Schuler M; Stamatis G; Pöttgen C
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiotherapy, University of Duisburg-Essen, University Hospital Essen, Essen.
[Ti] Title:Heart dose exposure as prognostic marker after radiotherapy for resectable stage IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer: secondary analysis of a randomized trial.
[So] Source:Ann Oncol;28(5):1084-1089, 2017 05 01.
[Is] ISSN:1569-8041
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Heart exposure to ionizing irradiation can cause ischaemic heart disease. The partial heart volume receiving ≥5 Gy (heartV5) was supposed to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after radiochemotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). But validation of the latter hypothesis is needed under the concurrent risks of lung cancer patients. Patients and methods: The ESPATUE phase III trial recruited patients with potentially operable IIIA(N2)/selected IIIB NSCLC between 01/2004 and 01/2013. Cisplatin/paclitaxel induction chemotherapy was given followed by neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RT/CT) to 45 Gy (1.5 Gy bid/concurrent cisplatin/vinorelbine). Operable patients were randomized to definitive RT/CT(arm A) or surgery (arm B) and therefore were treated at two different total dose levels of radiotherapy. HeartV5 and mean heart dose (MHD) were obtained from the 3D radiotherapy plans, the prognostic value was analysed using multivariable proportional hazard analysis. Results: A total of 161 patients were randomized in ESPATUE, heartV5 and MHD were obtained from the 3D radiotherapy plans for 155 of these [male/female:105/50, median age 58 (33-74) years, stage IIIA/IIIB: 54/101]. Power analysis revealed a power of 80% of this dataset to detect a prognostic value of heartV5 of the size found in RTOG 0617. Multivariable analysis did not identify heartV5 as an independent prognostic factor for survival adjusting for tumour and clinical characteristics with [hazard ratio 1.005 (0.995-1.015), P = 0.30] or without lower lobe tumour location [hazard ratio 0.999 (0.986-1.012), P = 0.83]. There was no influence of heartV5 on death without tumour progression. Tumour progression, and pneumonia were the leading causes of death representing 65% and 14% of the observed deaths. Conclusions: HeartV5 could not be validated as an independent prognostic factor for survival after neoadjuvant or definitive conformal radiochemotherapy. Tumour progression was the predominant cause of death. Register No: Z5 - 22461/2 - 2002-017 (German Federal Office for Radiation Protection).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy
Lung Neoplasms/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology
Chemoradiotherapy/adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Heart/radiation effects
Humans
Lung Neoplasms/mortality
Lung Neoplasms/pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardium/pathology
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiation Injuries/diagnosis
Radiation Injuries/etiology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/annonc/mdx069

  5 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512799
[Au] Autor:Ayedi I; Chaabouni H; Akrout M; Boudawara T; Toumi N; Khanfir A; Frikha M
[Ti] Title:Cardiac metastases: 4 cases report.
[So] Source:Tunis Med;95(6):429-433, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0041-4131
[Cp] Country of publication:Tunisia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cardiac metastases are rare. They are found in one to 10% of autopsies of patients withmalignant neoplasm. Adenocarcinoma represents the most common histologicaltype. The most common neoplasms that metastasize to the heart are lung andbreast cancers, melanoma, mesothelioma and lymphoma. However, Cardiacinvolvement is unusual in Hepatic, cutaneous and gastric cancer. We reportedthese three primary localizations in our cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503824
[Au] Autor:Cannavale G; Francone M; Galea N; Vullo F; Molisso A; Carbone I; Catalano C
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-Pathological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Fatty Images of the Heart: Spectrum of Normal and Pathological Findings by Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2018:5610347, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ectopic cardiac fatty images are not rarely detected incidentally by computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance, or by exams focused on the heart as in general thoracic imaging evaluations. A correct interpretation of these findings is essential in order to recognize their normal or pathological meaning, focusing on the eventually associated clinical implications. The development of techniques such as computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance allowed a detailed detection and evaluation of adipose tissue within the heart. This pictorial review illustrates the most common characteristics of cardiac fatty images by computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance, in a spectrum of normal and pathological conditions ranging from physiological adipose images to diseases presenting with cardiac fatty foci. Physiologic intramyocardial adipose tissue may normally be present in healthy adults, being not related to cardiac affections and without any clinical consequence. However cardiac fatty images may also be the expression of various diseases, comprehending arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, postmyocardial infarction lipomatous metaplasia, dilated cardiomyopathy, and lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum. Fatty neoplasms of the heart as lipoma and liposarcoma are also described.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2018/5610347

  7 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500442
[Au] Autor:Hsu CY; Doubrovin M; Hua CH; Mohammed O; Shulkin BL; Kaste S; Federico S; Metzger M; Krasin M; Tinkle C; Merchant TE; Lucas JT
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. chih-yang.hsu@stjude.org.
[Ti] Title:Radiomics Features Differentiate Between Normal and Tumoral High-Fdg Uptake.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3913, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Identification of FDGavid- neoplasms may be obscured by high-uptake normal tissues, thus limiting inferences about the natural history of disease. We introduce a FDG-PET radiomics tissue classifier for differentiating FDGavid- normal tissues from tumor. Thirty-three scans from 15 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and 68 scans from 23 patients with Ewing sarcoma treated on two prospective clinical trials were retrospectively analyzed. Disease volumes were manually segmented on FDG-PET and CT scans. Brain, heart, kidneys and bladder and tumor volumes were automatically segmented on PET images. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) derived shape and first order radiomics features were computed to build a random forest classifier. Manually segmented volumes were compared to automatically segmented tumor volumes. Classifier accuracy for normal tissues was 90%. Classifier performance was varied across normal tissue types (brain, left kidney and bladder, hear and right kidney were 100%, 96%, 97%, 83% and 87% respectively). Automatically segmented tumor volumes showed high concordance with the manually segmented tumor volumes (R = 0.97). Inclusion of texture-based radiomics features minimally contributed to classifier performance. Accurate normal tissue segmentation and classification facilitates accurate identification of FDGavid tissues and classification of those tissues as either tumor or normal tissue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-22319-4

  8 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386192
[Au] Autor:Tu H; Wen CP; Tsai SP; Chow WH; Wen C; Ye Y; Zhao H; Tsai MK; Huang M; Dinney CP; Tsao CK; Wu X
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
[Ti] Title:Cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and disease markers: prospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMJ;360:k134, 2018 01 31.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To assess the independent and joint associations of major chronic diseases and disease markers with cancer risk and to explore the benefit of physical activity in reducing the cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and disease markers. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Standard medical screening program in Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 405 878 participants, for whom cardiovascular disease markers (blood pressure, total cholesterol, and heart rate), diabetes, chronic kidney disease markers (proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate), pulmonary disease, and gouty arthritis marker (uric acid) were measured or diagnosed according to standard methods, were followed for an average of 8.7 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cancer incidence and cancer mortality. RESULTS: A statistically significantly increased risk of incident cancer was observed for the eight diseases and markers individually (except blood pressure and pulmonary disease), with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.07 to 1.44. All eight diseases and markers were statistically significantly associated with risk of cancer death, with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.12 to 1.70. Chronic disease risk scores summarizing the eight diseases and markers were positively associated with cancer risk in a dose-response manner, with the highest scores associated with a 2.21-fold (95% confidence interval 1.77-fold to 2.75-fold) and 4.00-fold (2.84-fold to 5.63-fold) higher cancer incidence and cancer mortality, respectively. High chronic disease risk scores were associated with substantial years of life lost, and the highest scores were associated with 13.3 years of life lost in men and 15.9 years of life lost in women. The population attributable fractions of cancer incidence or cancer mortality from the eight chronic diseases and markers together were comparable to those from five major lifestyle factors combined (cancer incidence: 20.5% 24.8%; cancer mortality: 38.9% 39.7%). Among physically active (versus inactive) participants, the increased cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and markers was attenuated by 48% for cancer incidence and 27% for cancer mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic disease is an overlooked risk factor for cancer, as important as five major lifestyle factors combined. In this study, chronic diseases contributed to more than one fifth of the risk for incident cancer and more than one third of the risk for cancer death. Physical activity is associated with a nearly 40% reduction in the cancer risk associated with chronic diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/blood
Chronic Disease/epidemiology
Neoplasms/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Arthritis, Gouty/epidemiology
Arthritis, Gouty/metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases/complications
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Chronic Disease/mortality
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer/methods
Exercise/physiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Lung Diseases/epidemiology
Lung Diseases/metabolism
Lung Diseases/physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms/epidemiology
Neoplasms/mortality
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology
Risk Factors
Taiwan/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.k134

  9 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29361616
[Au] Autor:Shioyama W
[Ad] Address:Dept. of Cardiovascular Medicine, Onco-Cardiology Unit, Osaka International Cancer Institute, Osaka Prefectural Hospital Organization.
[Ti] Title:[Onco-Cardiology - From the Standpoint of Cardiology].
[So] Source:Gan To Kagaku Ryoho;44(13):2052-2057, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0385-0684
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:In Japan, cardiovascular diseases are frequent complications in cancer patients owing to the rapidly aging population and changes in the overall lifestyle. In addition, new anticancer therapies have substantially improved the prognosis of cancer patients. Cardiotoxicity, also referred to as cancer treatment-related cardiac dysfunction, has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Cardiotoxicity may consist of hypertension, arrhythmia, thromboembolism, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, and left ventricular dysfunction which may progress to heart failure. Close interactions between cardiologists and oncologists are required for the optimal care of many cancer patients. Although cardiologists are expected to assist and advise the oncologist by providing diagnostic and prognostic information regarding developing cardiotoxicity, little is known about the cardiovascular pathogenic mechanisms associated with cancer treatment. Onco-cardiology is a medical subspecialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiotoxicity in cancer patients. This review describes the concept of onco-cardiology, and focuses on the management of cardiotoxicity that may arise during or after cancer therapy from the standpoint of cardiology. We also discuss noninvasive diagnostic options to identify and characterize cardiotoxicity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects
Cardiotoxins/adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases/chemically induced
Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Biomarkers/blood
Cardiotoxins/therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases/complications
Humans
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Cardiotoxins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 44530 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458957
[Au] Autor:Glockner JF
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: glockner.james@mayo.edu.
[Ti] Title:Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography of Cardiac Masses and Pseudomasses in the Atrioventricular Groove.
[So] Source:Can Assoc Radiol J;69(1):78-91, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1488-2361
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The atrioventricular (AV) groove constitutes the anatomic space separating the atria and ventricles. The AV groove is often difficult to visualize at echocardiography, and suspected lesions can be further assessed with cardiac computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. AV groove lesions may originate from within the AV groove or extend into this space from adjacent structures. The differential diagnosis for AV groove lesions is often wide, but a precise diagnosis can sometimes be made. This pictorial essay illustrates the magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography appearance of common and uncommon AV groove lesions, and attempts to provide a logical framework for differential diagnosis when confronted with a known or suspected lesion at cross-sectional imaging.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Heart Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Heart Atria/diagnostic imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180221
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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