Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Heat and Stroke [Words]
References found : 3562 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29523649
[Au] Autor:Li G; Guo Q; Liu Y; Li Y; Pan X
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China (G.L., Q.G., Y.L., X.P.); and Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA (Y.L.). liguoxing@bjmu.edu.cn.
[Ti] Title:Projected Temperature-Related Years of Life Lost From Stroke Due To Global Warming in a Temperate Climate City, Asia: Disease Burden Caused by Future Climate Change.
[So] Source:Stroke;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Global warming has attracted worldwide attention. Numerous studies have indicated that stroke is associated with temperature; however, few studies are available on the projections of the burden of stroke attributable to future climate change. We aimed to investigate the future trends of stroke years of life lost (YLL) associated with global warming. METHODS: We collected death records to examine YLL in Tianjin, China, from 2006 to 2011. We fitted a standard time-series Poisson regression model after controlling for trends, day of the week, relative humidity, and air pollution. We estimated temperature-YLL associations with a distributed lag nonlinear model. These models were then applied to the local climate projections to estimate temperature-related YLL in the 2050s and 2070s. We projected temperature-related YLL from stroke in Tianjin under 19 global-scale climate models and 3 different greenhouse gas emission scenarios. RESULTS: The results showed a slight decrease in YLL with percent decreases of 0.85%, 0.97%, and 1.02% in the 2050s and 0.94%, 1.02%, and 0.91% in the 2070s for the 3 scenarios, respectively. The increases in heat-related annual YLL and the decreases in cold-related YLL under the high emission scenario were the strongest. The monthly analysis showed that the most significant increase occurred in the summer months, particularly in August, with percent changes >150% in the 2050s and up to 300% in the 2070s. CONCLUSIONS: Future changes in climate are likely to lead to an increase in heat-related YLL, and this increase will not be offset by adaptation under both medium emission and high emission scenarios. Health protections from hot weather will become increasingly necessary, and measures to reduce cold effects will also remain important.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 3562 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415213
[Au] Autor:Singer DE; Byrne C; Chen L; Shao S; Goldsmith J; Niebuhr DW
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Uniformed Services of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.
[Ti] Title:Risk of Exertional Heat Illnesses Associated with Sickle Cell Trait in U.S. Military.
[So] Source:Mil Med;, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: A number of studies have found an association between sickle cell trait (SCT) and exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) including heat stroke, a potentially fatal condition. The strength of this association varied across studies, limiting the ability to quantify potential benefits of SCT-screening policies for competitive athletics and military service members. We determined the relative rate and attributable risk of developing EHI associated with being SCT positive and the EHI health care utilization. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among U.S. enlisted, active duty service members during 1992-2012 from the Department of Defense Military Healthcare System databases. All 15,081 SCT-positive individuals and a sample of 60,320 from those considered SCT negative were followed through 2013 for EHI outcomes ranging from mild heat illness to heat stroke. Results: The adjusted hazard ratio for EHI in SCT-positive compared with SCT-negative individuals was 1.24 (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.45). Risk factors for EHI included age over 30 yr at enlistment, female gender, Marine Corps, combat occupations, and enlistment between April and June. An estimated 216 Department of Defense enlistees (95% confidence interval: 147, 370) would need to be screened to identify and potentially prevent one case of EHI. The attributable risk of EHI due to SCT was 33% (95% confidence interval 19, 45%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that SCT screening will identify approximately a third of SCT individuals at risk for EHI, but does not provide definitive evidence for universal compared with selective (e.g., occupational based) in military enlistees. A cost-effectiveness analysis is needed for policy makers to assess the overall value of universal SCT screening to prevent morbidity and mortality in both the military and the collegiate athletic populations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx085

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[PMID]: 29365179
[Au] Autor:Oh RC; Malave B; Chaltry JD
[Ad] Address:Department of Family Medicine, Martin Army Community Hospital, Fort Benning, GA 31905.
[Ti] Title:Collapse in the Heat - From Overhydration to the Emergency Room - Three Cases of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Associated with Exertional Heat Illness.
[So] Source:Mil Med;183(3-4):e225-e228, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Exertional heat illness and exercise-associated hyponatremia continue to be a problem in military and recreational events. Symptoms of hyponatremia can be mistaken for heat exhaustion or heat stroke. We describe three cases of symptomatic hyponatremia initially contributed to heat illnesses. The first soldier was a 31-yr-old female who "took a knee" at mile 6 of a 12-mile foot march. She had a core temperature of 100.9°F, a serum sodium level of 129 mmol/L, and drank approximately 4.5 quarts of water in 2 h. The second case was a 27-yr-old female soldier who collapsed at mile 11 of a 12-mile march. Her core temperature was 102.9°F and sodium level was 131 mmol/L. She drank 5 quarts in 2.5 h. The third soldier was a 27-yr-old male who developed nausea and vomiting while conducting an outdoor training event. His core temperature was 98.7°F and sodium level was 125 mmol/L. He drank 6 quarts in 2 h to combat symptoms of heat. All the three cases developed symptomatic hyponatremia by overconsumption of fluids during events lasting less than 3 h. Obtaining point-of-care serum sodium may improve recognition of hyponatremia and guide management for the patient with suspected heat illness and hyponatremia. Depending on severity of symptoms, exercise-associated hyponatremia can be managed by fluid restriction, oral hypertonic broth, or with intravenous 3% saline. Utilizing an ad libitum approach or limiting fluid availability during field or recreational events of up to 3 h may prevent symptomatic hyponatremia while limiting significant dehydration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx105

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[PMID]: 29510140
[Au] Autor:Yamamoto Y; Hosoda K; Imahori T; Tanaka J; Matsuo K; Nakai T; Irino Y; Shinohara M; Sato N; Sasayama T; Tanaka K; Nagashima H; Kohta M; Kohmura E
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Pentose phosphate pathway activation via HSP27 phosphorylation by ATM kinase: A putative endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.
[So] Source:Brain Res;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6240
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Molecular mechanism underlying ischemic stroke remains poorly understood. We previously reported glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is activated via heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) phosphorylation at serine 85 (S85) by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase during cerebral ischemia. This mechanism seems to be endogenous antioxidative system. To determine whether this system also works during reperfusion, we performed comparative metabolic analysis of reperfusion effect on metabolism in rat cortex using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Metabolic profiling using gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analysis showed changes in metabolic state that depended on reperfusion time. Enrichment analysis showed PPP was significantly upregulated during ischemia-reperfusion. Significant increases in fructose 6-phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate after reperfusion also suggested enhancement of PPP. In relation to PPP, ischemia-reperfusion induced an increase of up to 69-fold in HSP27 transcripts after 24-h reperfusion. Immunoblotting showed gradual increase in HSP27 protein and marked increase in HSP27 phosphorylation (S85) that were time-dependent (4.5-fold after 24-h reperfusion). G6PD activity was significantly elevated after 1-h MCAO (20%), reduced after 1-h reperfusion, increased gradually thereafter and significantly elevated after 24-h reperfusion. The NADPH/NAD ratio displayed similar increasing pattern. Intracerebroventricular injection of ATM kinase inhibitor (KU-55933) significantly reduced HSP27 phosphorylation and G6PD activity, significantly increased protein carbonyl, and resulted in increase in infarct size (100%) 24-h after reperfusion following 90-min MCAO. Consequentlly, G6PD activation via HSP27 phosphorylation by ATM kinase may be part of endogenous antioxidant defense neuroprotection mechanism that is activated during ischemia-reperfusion. These findings have important implications for treatment of stroke.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 3562 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500287
[Au] Autor:Fields ME; Guilliams KP; Ragan DK; Binkley MM; Eldeniz C; Chen Y; Hulbert ML; McKinstry RC; Shimony JS; Vo KD; Doctor A; An H; Ford AL; Lee JM
[Ad] Address:From the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (M.E.F., M.L.H.), Division of Pediatric Neurology (K.P.G.), Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (K.P.G., A.D.), Department of Neurology (D.K.R., Y.C., A.L.F., J.-M.L.), and Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (C.E., R.C.M., J.S.S., K.D.V.,
[Ti] Title:Regional oxygen extraction predicts border zone vulnerability to stroke in sickle cell disease.
[So] Source:Neurology;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1526-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine mechanisms underlying regional vulnerability to infarction in sickle cell disease (SCD) by measuring voxel-wise cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO ) in children with SCD. METHODS: Participants underwent brain MRIs to measure voxel-based CBF, OEF, and CMRO . An infarct heat map was created from an independent pediatric SCD cohort with silent infarcts and compared to prospectively obtained OEF maps. RESULTS: Fifty-six participants, 36 children with SCD and 20 controls, completed the study evaluation. Whole-brain CBF (99.2 vs 66.3 mL/100 g/min, < 0.001), OEF (42.7% vs 28.8%, < 0.001), and CMRO (3.7 vs 2.5 mL/100 g/min, < 0.001) were higher in the SCD cohort compared to controls. A region of peak OEF was identified in the deep white matter in the SCD cohort, delineated by a ratio map of average SCD to control OEF voxels. CMRO in this region, which encompassed the CBF nadir, was low relative to all white matter ( < 0.001). Furthermore, this peak OEF region colocalized with regions of greatest infarct density derived from an independent SCD cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated OEF in the deep white matter identifies a signature of metabolically stressed brain tissue at increased stroke risk in pediatric patients with SCD. We propose that border zone physiology, exacerbated by chronic anemic hypoxia, explains the high risk in this region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3562 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29472229
[Au] Autor:Walter E; Steel K
[Ad] Address:Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford.
[Ti] Title:Management of exertional heat stroke: a practical update for primary care physicians.
[So] Source:Br J Gen Pract;68(668):153-154, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1478-5242
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3399/bjgp18X695273

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[PMID]: 29253838
[Au] Autor:Hifumi T; Kondo Y; Shimazaki J; Oda Y; Shiraishi S; Wakasugi M; Kanda J; Moriya T; Yagi M; Ono M; Kawahara T; Tonouchi M; Yokota H; Miyake Y; Shimizu K
[Ad] Address:Emergency Medical Center, Kagawa University Hospital, 1750-1 Ikenobe, Miki, Kita, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan. Electronic address: hifumitoru@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Prognostic significance of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with heat stroke in a nationwide registry.
[So] Source:J Crit Care;44:306-311, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8615
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Heat stroke (HS) induces disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC); however, the prognostic significance of DIC in patients with HS has not yet been fully assessed in large populations. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of DIC in patients with HS using a nationwide registry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data regarding HS were obtained and analyzed from three prospective, observational, multicenter HS registries (HSRs): 2010, 2012, and 2014. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of hospital death. DIC was diagnosed according to the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) diagnostic criteria, with a total score≥4 implying a DIC diagnosis. RESULTS: In total, 705 (median age, 68years; 501 men) were included in this study. Hospital mortality was 7.1% (50 patients). Multiple regression analysis revealed that hospital mortality was significantly associated with presence of DIC (odds ratio [OR], 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-4.27; p=0.028). Mortality worsened as the DIC score increased, and increased remarkably to approximately 10% when the DIC score was 2. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of DIC was an independent prognostic factor of hospital mortality in patients with HS. Hematological dysfunction represents potential target for specific therapies in HS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29484657
[Au] Autor:Lin X; Zhao T; Lin CH; Zuo D; Ye Z; Lin S; Wen S; Liu L; Lin MT; Chang CP; Chao CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Spinal Cord Injury and Repair, Trauma and Orthopedics, Institute of Chinese PLA, General Hospital of Jinan Military Region, Shandong, China.
[Ti] Title:Melatonin provides protection against heat stroke-induced myocardial injury in male rats.
[So] Source:J Pharm Pharmacol;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7158
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the cardioprotective effects of melatonin on heat stroke (HS) induced acute myocardial infarction in rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Myocardial injury was induced by subjecting the anaesthetized rats to a high ambient temperature of 43°C for 70 min. Such a high ambient temperature caused hyperthermia, hypotension and myocardial injury in rats. Rats were treated with melatonin (3 mg/kg) intravenously one hour before and followed by an additional dose immediately after heat stress. KEY FINDINGS: At the onset of HS, animals displayed myocardial injury evidenced by increased levels of cardiac damage indicators (e.g. total lactate dehydrogenase, cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB), increased cardiac damage scores and suppressed left ventricular performance. Animals with HS also had increased cardiac oxidative stress evidenced by increased levels of lipid peroxidation (e.g. increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and activated inflammation (e.g. increased levels of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α). Pretreatment with melatonin significantly reversed the HS-induced myocardial injury, cardiac oxidative stress and cardiac inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Melatonin may protect against HS-induced myocardial injury in male rats by mitigating oxidative stress and inflammation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jphp.12895

  9 / 3562 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29421932
[Au] Autor:Kim JY; Han Y; Lee JE; Yenari MA
[Ad] Address:a Department of Anatomy , Yonsei University College of Medicine , Seoul , Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) as a therapeutic target for stroke.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Ther Targets;22(3):191-199, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7631
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is a cytosolic chaperone which facilitates protein folding, degradation, complex assembly, and translocation. Following stroke, these functions have the potential to lead to cytoprotection, and this has been demonstrated using genetic mutant models, direct gene transfer or the induction of Hsp70 via heat stress, approaches which limit its translational utility. Recently, the investigation of Hsp70-inducing pharmacological compounds, which, through their ability to inhibit Hsp90, has obvious clinical implications in terms of potential therapies to mitigate cell death and inflammation, and lead to neuroprotection from brain injury. Areas covered: In this review, we will focus on the role of Hsp70 in cell death and inflammation, and the current literature surrounding the pharmacological induction in acute ischemic stroke models with comments on potential applications at the clinical level. Expert opinion: Such neuroprotectants could be used to synergistically improve neurological outcome or to extend the time window of existing interventions, thus increasing the numbers of stroke victims eligible for treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/14728222.2018.1439477

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[PMID]: 29428173
[Au] Autor:Hopp S; Dominici F; Bobb JF
[Ad] Address:Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine, 445 Health Sciences Blvd, Dothan, AL 36303, United States. Electronic address: hopps@acom.edu.
[Ti] Title:Medical diagnoses of heat wave-related hospital admissions in older adults.
[So] Source:Prev Med;110:81-85, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Heat waves have been associated with adverse human health effects, including higher rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and these health effects may be exacerbated under continued climate change. However, specific causes of hospitalizations associated with heat waves have not been characterized on a national scale. We systematically estimated the risks of cause-specific hospitalizations during heat waves in a national cohort of 23.7 million Medicare enrollees residing in 1943 U.S. counties during 1999-2010. Heat waves were defined as ≥2 consecutive days exceeding the county's 99th percentile of daily temperatures, and were matched to non-heat wave periods by county and week. We considered 50 outcomes from broad disease groups previously associated with heat wave-related hospitalizations, and estimated cause-specific relative risks (RRs) of hospital admissions on heat wave days. We identified 11 diagnoses with a higher admission risk on heat wave days, with heat stroke and sunstroke having the highest risk (RR = 22.5, [95% CI 14.9-34.2]). Other diseases with elevated risks included fluid and electrolyte disorders [(Hyperosmolality RR = 1.4, [95% CI 1.1-1.3]; Hypoosmolaltiy RR = 1.2, [95% CI 1.1-1.3])] and acute kidney failure (RR = 1.1, [95% CI 1.1-1.2]). These risks tended to be higher under more severe heat wave events. In addition, risks were higher among adults in the oldest (≥85) category (reference: 65-74) for volume depletion and heat exhaustion. Several causes of hospitalization identified are preventable, and public health interventions, including early warning systems and plans targeting risk factors for these illnesses, could reduce adverse effects of heat in the present and under climate change.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher


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