Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29098600
[Au] Autor:Lillicrap T; Tahtali M; Neely A; Wang X; Bivard A; Lueck C
[Ad] Address:Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. tplillicrap@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A model based on the Pennes bioheat transfer equation is valid in normal brain tissue but not brain tissue suffering focal ischaemia.
[So] Source:Australas Phys Eng Sci Med;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1879-5447
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ischaemic stroke is a major public health issue in both developed and developing nations. Hypothermia is believed to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischaemia. Conversely, elevated brain temperature is associated with poor outcome after ischaemic stroke. Mechanisms of heat exchange in normally-perfused brain are relatively well understood, but these mechanisms have not been studied as extensively during focal cerebral ischaemia. A finite element model (FEM) of heat exchange during focal ischaemia in the human brain was developed, based on the Pennes bioheat equation. This model incorporated healthy (normally-perfused) brain tissue, tissue that was mildly hypoperfused but not at risk of cell death (referred to as oligaemia), tissue that was hypoperfused and at risk of death but not dead (referred to as penumbra) and tissue that had died as a result of ischaemia (referred to as infarct core). The results of simulations using this model were found to match previous in-vivo temperature data for normally-perfused brain. However, the results did not match what limited data are available for hypoperfused brain tissue, in particular the penumbra, which is the focus of acute neuroprotective treatments such as hypothermia. These results suggest that the assumptions of the Pennes bioheat equation, while valid in the brain under normal circumstances, are not valid during focal ischaemia. Further investigation into the heat exchange profiles that do occur during focal ischaemia may yield results for clinical trials of therapeutic hypothermia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13246-017-0595-6

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[PMID]: 29095276
[Au] Autor:Yang M; Li Z; Zhao Y; Zhou F; Zhang Y; Gao J; Yin T; Hu X; Mao Z; Xiao J; Wang L; Liu C; Ma L; Yuan Z; Lv J; Shen H; Hou PC; Kang H
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing bDepartment of Orthopedics, Wuhan General Hospital of Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou cDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, Kai Luan General Hospital, Tangshan dDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, The Centre Hospital of Baotou, Baotou eDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, The 251th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Zhangjiakou fDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, The 180th Hospital of Chinese PLA, Quanzhou gDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, People's Hospital Chang Ji Hui Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang hDepartment of Critical Care Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Nan Tong University, Nantong, China iDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Outcome and risk factors associated with extent of central nervous system injury due to exertional heat stroke.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(44):e8417, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To explore the relationship between the extent of central nervous system (CNS) injury and patient outcomes meanwhile research the potential risk factors associated with neurologic sequelae. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed data from 117 consecutive patients (86 survivors, 31 nonsurvivors) with exertional heat stroke (EHS) who had been admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) at 48 Chinese hospitals between April 2003 and July 2015. Extent of CNS injury was dichotomized according to Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score (severe 3-8, not severe 9-15). We then assessed differences in hospital mortality based on the extent of CNS injury by comparing 90-day survival time between the patient groups. Exploring the risk factors of neurologic sequelae. The primary outcomewas the 90-day survival ratewhich differed between the 2 groups (P = .023). The incidence of neurologic sequelae was 24.4%. For its risk factors, duration of recurrent hyperthermia (OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.20-2.49, P = .003), duration of CNS injury (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.04-1.85, P = .025), and low GCS in the first 24 hours after admission (OR = 2.39, 95% CI: 1.11-5.15, P = .025) were selected by multivariable logistic regression. Cooling effect was eliminated as a factor (OR = 2641.27, 95% CI 0.40-1.73_107, P = .079). Significant differences in 90-day survival ratewere observed based on the extent of CNS injury in patients with EHS, and incidence was 24.4% for neurologic sequelae. Duration of recurrent hyperthermia, duration of CNS injury, and low GCS score in the first 24 hours following admission may be independent risk factors of neurologic sequelae. Cooling effect should be validated in the further studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008417

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[PMID]: 28933560
[Au] Autor:Zonfrillo MR; Ramsay ML; Fennell JE; Andreasen A
[Ad] Address:a Injury Prevention Center , Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children's Hospital , Providence , Rhode Island.
[Ti] Title:Unintentional non-traffic injury and fatal events: Threats to children in and around vehicles.
[So] Source:Traffic Inj Prev;:1-5, 2017 Sep 21.
[Is] ISSN:1538-957X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: There have been substantial reductions in motor vehicle crash-related child fatalities due to advances in legislation, public safety campaigns, and engineering. Less is known about non-traffic injuries and fatalities to children in and around motor vehicles. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of various non-traffic incidents, injuries, and fatalities to children using a unique surveillance system and database. METHODS: Instances of non-traffic injuries and fatalities in the United States to children 0-14years were tracked from January 1990 to December 2014 using a compilation of sources including media reports, individual accounts from families of affected children, medical examiner reports, police reports, child death review teams, coroner reports, medical professionals, legal professionals, and other various modes of publication. RESULTS: Over the 25-year period, there were at least 11,759 events resulting in 3,396 deaths. The median age of the affected child was 3.7years. The incident types included 3,115 children unattended in hot vehicles resulting in 729 deaths, 2,251 backovers resulting in 1,232 deaths, 1,439 frontovers resulting in 692 deaths, 777 vehicles knocked into motion resulting in 227 deaths, 415 underage drivers resulting in 203 deaths, 172 power window incidents resulting in 61 deaths, 134 falls resulting in 54 deaths, 79 fires resulting in 41 deaths, and 3,377 other incidents resulting in 157 deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Non-traffic injuries and fatalities present an important threat to the safety and lives of very young children. Future efforts should consider complementary surveillance mechanisms to systematically and comprehensively capture all non-traffic incidents. Continued education, engineering modifications, advocacy, and legislation can help continue to prevent these incidents and must be incorporated in overall child vehicle safety initiatives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15389588.2017.1369053

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[PMID]: 28233198
[Au] Autor:Rashedul HK; Kalam MA; Masjuki HH; Teoh YH; How HG; Monirul IM; Imdadul HK
[Ad] Address:Centre for Energy Sciences, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. mdrashedhasan82@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Attempts to minimize nitrogen oxide emission from diesel engine by using antioxidant-treated diesel-biodiesel blend.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;24(10):9305-9313, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The study represents a comprehensive analysis of engine exhaust emission variation from a compression ignition (CI) diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel blends. Biodiesel used in this investigation was produced through transesterification procedure from Moringa oleifera oil. A single cylinder, four-stroke, water-cooled, naturally aspirated diesel engine was used for this purpose. The pollutants from the exhaust of the engine that are monitored in this study are nitrogen oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), and smoke opacity. Engine combustion and performance parameters are also measured together with exhaust emission data. Some researchers have reported that the reason for higher NO emission of biodiesel is higher prompt NO formation. The use of antioxidant-treated biodiesel in a diesel engine is a promising approach because antioxidants reduce the formation of free radicals, which are responsible for the formation of prompt NO during combustion. Two different antioxidant additives namely 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) and 2,2'-methylenebis(4-methyl-6-tert-butylphenol) (MBEBP) were individually dissolved at a concentration of 1% by volume in MB30 (30% moringa biodiesel with 70% diesel) fuel blend to investigate and compare NO as well as other emissions. The result shows that both antioxidants reduced NO emission significantly; however, HC, CO, and smoke were found slightly higher compared to pure biodiesel blends, but not more than the baseline fuel diesel. The result also shows that both antioxidants were quite effective in reducing peak heat release rate (HRR) and brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) as well as improving brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and oxidation stability. Based on this study, antioxidant-treated M. oleifera biodiesel blend (MB30) can be used as a very promising alternative source of fuel in diesel engine without any modifications.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biofuels
Nitrogen Oxides
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Gasoline
Nitric Oxide
Vehicle Emissions
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biofuels); 0 (Gasoline); 0 (Nitrogen Oxides); 0 (Vehicle Emissions); 31C4KY9ESH (Nitric Oxide)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-017-8573-9

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[PMID]: 28985560
[Au] Autor:Stockwell BR; Friedmann Angeli JP; Bayir H; Bush AI; Conrad M; Dixon SJ; Fulda S; Gascn S; Hatzios SK; Kagan VE; Noel K; Jiang X; Linkermann A; Murphy ME; Overholtzer M; Oyagi A; Pagnussat GC; Park J; Ran Q; Rosenfeld CS; Salnikow K; Tang D; Torti FM; Torti SV; Toyokuni S; Woerpel KA; Zhang DD
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, 550 West 120(th) Street, MC 4846, New York, NY 10027, USA; Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 550 West 120(th) Street, MC 4846, New York, NY 10027, USA. Electronic address: bstockwell@columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Ferroptosis: A Regulated Cell Death Nexus Linking Metabolism, Redox Biology, and Disease.
[So] Source:Cell;171(2):273-285, 2017 Oct 05.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4172
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ferroptosis is a form of regulated cell death characterized by the iron-dependent accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides to lethal levels. Emerging evidence suggests that ferroptosis represents an ancient vulnerability caused by the incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids into cellular membranes, and cells have developed complex systems that exploit and defend against this vulnerability in different contexts. The sensitivity to ferroptosis is tightly linked to numerous biological processes, including amino acid, iron, and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and the biosynthesis of glutathione, phospholipids, NADPH, and coenzyme Q . Ferroptosis has been implicated in the pathological cell death associated with degenerative diseases (i.e., Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases), carcinogenesis, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and kidney degeneration in mammals and is also implicated in heat stress in plants. Ferroptosis may also have a tumor-suppressor function that could be harnessed for cancer therapy. This Primer reviews the mechanisms underlying ferroptosis, highlights connections to other areas of biology and medicine, and recommends tools and guidelines for studying this emerging form of regulated cell death.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Death
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis
Humans
Iron/metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); E1UOL152H7 (Iron)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171006
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28285429
[Au] Autor:Lee BS; Jung E; Lee Y; Chung SH
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-Ro 43-Gil, Songpa-Gu, Seoul, 138-736, South Korea. mdleebs@amc.seoul.kr.
[Ti] Title:Hypothermia decreased the expression of heat shock proteins in neonatal rat model of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.
[So] Source:Cell Stress Chaperones;22(3):409-415, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1466-1268
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypothermia (HT) is a well-established neuroprotective strategy against neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSP) has been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of stroke. We aimed to investigate the effect of HT on HSP70 and HSP27 expression in a neonatal rat model of HIE. Seven-day-old rat pups were exposed to hypoxia for 90min to establish the Rice-Vannucci model and were assigned to the following four groups: hypoxic injury (HI)-normothermia (NT, 36C), HI-HT (30C), sham-NT, and sham-HT. After temperature intervention for 24h, the mRNA and protein expression of HSP70 and HSP27 were measured. The association between HSP expression and brain injury severity was also evaluated. The brain infarct size was significantly smaller in the HI-HT group than in the HI-NT group. The mRNA and protein expression of both HSPs were significantly greater in the two HI groups, compared to those in the two sham groups. Moreover, among the rat pups subjected to HI, HT significantly reduced the mRNA and protein expression of both HSPs. The mRNA expression level of the HSPs was proportional to the brain injury severity. Post-ischemic HT, i.e., a cold shock attenuated the expression of HSP70 and HSP27 in a neonatal rat model of HIE. Our study suggests that neither HSP70 nor HSP27 expression is involved in the neuroprotective mechanism through which prolonged HT protects against neonatal HIE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12192-017-0782-0

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[PMID]: 29020735
[Au] Autor:Ollove M
[Ti] Title:Protecting Student Athletes. Are states doing enough to keep student athletes safe from heat and head injuries?
[So] Source:State Legis;43(9):24-5, 2017 Oct-Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0147-6041
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Athletes/legislation & jurisprudence
Athletic Injuries/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Brain Concussion/prevention & control
Child
Heart Arrest/prevention & control
Heat Stroke/prevention & control
Humans
State Government
United States
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:T
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171011
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28280039
[Au] Autor:Ghasemzedah N; Hayek SS; Ko YA; Eapen DJ; Patel RS; Manocha P; Al Kassem H; Khayata M; Veledar E; Kremastinos D; Thorball CW; Pielak T; Sikora S; Zafari AM; Lerakis S; Sperling L; Vaccarino V; Epstein SE; Quyyumi AA
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (N.G., S.S.H., D.J.E., R.S.P., P.M., H.A.K., M.K., E.V., A.M.Z., S.L., L.S., V.V., A.A.Q.); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (Y.-A.K.); Institute of
[Ti] Title:Pathway-Specific Aggregate Biomarker Risk Score Is Associated With Burden of Coronary Artery Disease and Predicts Near-Term Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Death.
[So] Source:Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes;10(3), 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1941-7705
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Inflammation, coagulation, and cell stress contribute to atherosclerosis and its adverse events. A biomarker risk score (BRS) based on the circulating levels of biomarkers C-reactive protein, fibrin degradation products, and heat shock protein-70 representing these 3 pathways was a strong predictor of future outcomes. We investigated whether soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a marker of immune activation, is predictive of outcomes independent of the aforementioned markers and whether its addition to a 3-BRS improves risk reclassification. METHODS AND RESULTS: C-reactive protein, fibrin degradation product, heat shock protein-70, and suPAR were measured in 3278 patients undergoing coronary angiography. The BRS was calculated by counting the number of biomarkers above a cutoff determined using the Youden's index. Survival analyses were performed using models adjusted for traditional risk factors. A high suPAR level ≥3.5 ng/mL was associated with all-cause death and myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.35) after adjustment for risk factors, C-reactive protein, fibrin degradation product, and heat shock protein-70. Addition of suPAR to the 3-BRS significantly improved the C statistic, integrated discrimination improvement, and net reclassification index for the primary outcome. A BRS of 1, 2, 3, or 4 was associated with a 1.81-, 2.59-, 6.17-, and 8.80-fold increase, respectively, in the risk of death and myocardial infarction. The 4-BRS was also associated with severity of coronary artery disease and composite end points. CONCLUSIONS: SuPAR is independently predictive of adverse outcomes, and its addition to a 3-BRS comprising C-reactive protein, fibrin degradation product, and heat shock protein-70 improved risk reclassification. The clinical utility of using a 4-BRS for risk prediction and management of patients with coronary artery disease warrants further study.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging
Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/blood
Myocardial Infarction/etiology
Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Biomarkers/blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease/blood
Coronary Artery Disease/complications
Coronary Artery Disease/mortality
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis
Myocardial Infarction/mortality
Predictive Value of Tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Severity of Illness Index
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products); 0 (HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins); 0 (Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170310
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28073852
[Au] Autor:Loop MS; Howard G; de Los Campos G; Al-Hamdan MZ; Safford MM; Levitan EB; McClure LA
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Epidemiology (M.S.L., E.B.L.) and Department of Biostatistics (G.H.), School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Department of Statistics & Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing (G.d.l.C.)
[Ti] Title:Heat Maps of Hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, and Smoking in the Continental United States.
[So] Source:Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes;10(1), 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1941-7705
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Geographic variations in cardiovascular mortality are substantial, but descriptions of geographic variations in major cardiovascular risk factors have relied on data aggregated to counties. Herein, we provide the first description of geographic variation in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking within and across US counties. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline risk factor measurements and latitude/longitude of participant residence collected from 2003 to 2007 in the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke). Of the 30 239 participants, all risk factor measurements and location data were available for 28 887 (96%). The mean (SD) age of these participants was 64.8(9.4) years; 41% were black; 55% were female; 59% were hypertensive; 22% were diabetic; and 15% were current smokers. In logistic regression models stratified by race, the median(range) predicted prevalence of the risk factors were as follows: for hypertension, 49% (45%-58%) among whites and 72% (68%-78%) among blacks; for diabetes mellitus, 14% (10%-20%) among whites and 31% (28%-41%) among blacks; and for current smoking, 12% (7%-16%) among whites and 18% (11%-22%) among blacks. Hypertension was most prevalent in the central Southeast among whites, but in the west Southeast among blacks. Diabetes mellitus was most prevalent in the west and central Southeast among whites but in south Florida among blacks. Current smoking was most prevalent in the west Southeast and Midwest among whites and in the north among blacks. CONCLUSIONS: Geographic disparities in prevalent hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking exist within states and within counties in the continental United States, and the patterns differ by race.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
Hypertension/epidemiology
Smoking/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: African Americans
Age Distribution
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis
Cardiovascular Diseases/ethnology
Cluster Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis
Diabetes Mellitus/ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Hypertension/diagnosis
Hypertension/ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking/adverse effects
Smoking/ethnology
Time Factors
United States/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170111
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29071978
[Au] Autor:Xu L; Yan XZ; Li ZY; Cao XF; Wang M
[Ad] Address:The First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College, Bengbu 233004, Anhui Province, China.
[Ti] Title:[Effect of "Xingnao Kaiqiao Zhenfa" (Acupuncture Technique for Restoring Consciousness) Combined with Rehabilitation Training on Nerve Repair and Expression of Growth-associated Protein-43 of Peri-ischemic Cortex in Ischemic Stroke Rats].
[So] Source:Zhen Ci Yan Jiu;42(3):223-8, 2017 Jun 25.
[Is] ISSN:1000-0607
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of "Xingnao Kaiqiao Zhenfa" (acupuncture technique for restoring consciousness) combined with enriched rehabilitation training on motor function and expression of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) of peri-ischemic cortex in ischemic stroke rats, so as to investigate its mechanism underlying improvement of ischemic stroke. METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into sham operation, model, rehabilitation and comprehensive rehabilitation groups, which were further divided into 3 time-points:7, 14 and 21 d ( =6 in each). Cerebral ischemia(CI) model was established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery with heat-coagulation. The rehabilitation group was treated by enriched rehabilitation training, once a day. The comprehensive rehabilitation group was treated by acupuncture combined with enriched rehabilitation training. Acupuncture was applied to bilateral "Neiguan"(PC 6) and "Shuigou"(GV 26) for 30 min, once a day. The neurological function score, balance-beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were evaluated at the end of the corresponding treatment time. The expression of GAP-43 in peri-ischemic cortex was detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In comparison with the sham operation group, the scores of neurological function, beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly higher in the model group ( <0.01). There were no significant changes in the scores of balance-beam walking and rotating-rod walking tests in the rehabilitation group compared with the model group on day 7 ( >0.05). Compared with the model group at the other time points, the scores of neurological function, balance-beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly lower in the rehabilitation and comprehensive rehabilitation groups ( <0.05). Compared with the rehabilitation group, the scores of neurological function, balance-beam walking test and rotating-rod walking test were significantly lower in the comprehensive rehabilitation group ( <0.05). In comparison with the sham operation group, the number of GAP-43 positive cells of peri-ischemic cortex was significantly higher in the model group ( <0.01). Compared with the model group, the numbers of GAP-43 positive cells of peri-ischemic cortex were significantly increased in the rehabilitation and comprehensive rehabilitation groups ( <0.01). The number of GAP-43 positive cells of peri-ischemic cortex in the comprehensive rehabilitation group was significantly higher than that in the rehabilitation group ( <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: "Xingnao Kaiqiao Zhenfa" combined with enriched rehabilitation training can promote the recovery of nerve function in ischemic stroke rats, which may be associated with its effect in up-regulating the expression of GAP-43 in the peri-ischemic cortex.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:In-Process


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