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[PMID]: 29224949
[Au] Autor:Al-Ashhab ME; Elbegawy HEA; Hasan HAA
[Ad] Address:Associate Professor, Orthopedics and Traumatology Department, Benha Faculty of Medicine, Benha University, Qualubia, Benha, Egypt. Electronic address: alashhab3@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Through Two Medial Portals for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciopathy.
[So] Source:J Foot Ankle Surg;57(2):264-268, 2018 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1542-2224
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plantar fasciopathy is a common cause of heel pain. Endoscopic plantar fasciotomy has the advantage of less surgical trauma and rapid recovery. The aim of the present prospective study was to delineate the results of endoscopic plantar fascia release through 2 medial portals. The present study included 2 groups. The first group included 27 feet in 25 patients that had undergone endoscopic plantar fascia release followed up for 19.7 (range 12 to 33) months. The second group, the control group, included 20 feet in 16 patients treated conservatively and followed up for 16.4 (range 12 to 24) months. The results of endoscopic plantar fascia release were superior to the conservative methods. The surgically treated group experienced significantly less pain, activity limitations, and gait abnormality. The presence of a calcaneal spur had no effect on the final postoperative score. In conclusion, endoscopic plantar fascia release through 2 medial portals is an effective procedure for treatment of resistant plantar fasciopathy that fails to respond to conservative management options.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28467569
[Au] Autor:Kuran B; Aydog T; Erçalik C; Arda P; Yilmaz F; Dogu B; Öncü J; Durlanik G
[Ad] Address:Deparmemt of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University Faculty of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey. banukuran@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Medial calcaneal neuropathy: A rare cause of prolonged heel pain.
[So] Source:Agri;29(1):43-46, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1300-0012
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pain heel constitutes 15% of foot pain. Pain may be caused by plantar fasciitis, calcaneal fractures, calcaneal apophysitis, heel pad atrophy, inflammatory diseases or related with nerve involvement. Tibial, plantar and/or medial nerve entrapment are the neural causes of pain. Most of the heel soft tissue sensation is provided by medial calcaneal nerve. Diagnosis of heel pain due to neural causes depends on history and a careful examination. Surgery should not be undertaken before excluding other causes of heel pain. Diagnosis should be reconsidered following conservative therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fasciitis, Plantar/diagnosis
Heel
Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Calcaneus/innervation
Diagnosis, Differential
Fasciitis, Plantar/complications
Fasciitis, Plantar/diagnostic imaging
Fasciitis, Plantar/rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pain, Intractable/etiology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome/complications
Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome/rehabilitation
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5505/agri.2015.13540

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[PMID]: 29234467
[Au] Autor:Ridge ST; Myrer JW; Olsen MT; Jurgensmeier K; Johnson AW
[Ad] Address:Department of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 USA.
[Ti] Title:Reliability of doming and toe flexion testing to quantify foot muscle strength.
[So] Source:J Foot Ankle Res;10:55, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1757-1146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Quantifying the strength of the intrinsic foot muscles has been a challenge for clinicians and researchers. The reliable measurement of this strength is important in order to assess weakness, which may contribute to a variety of functional issues in the foot and lower leg, including plantar fasciitis and hallux valgus. This study reports 3 novel methods for measuring foot strength - doming (previously unmeasured), hallux flexion, and flexion of the lesser toes. Methods: Twenty-one healthy volunteers performed the strength tests during two testing sessions which occurred one to five days apart. Each participant performed each series of strength tests (doming, hallux flexion, and lesser toe flexion) four times during the first testing session (twice with each of two raters) and two times during the second testing session (once with each rater). Intra-class correlation coefficients were calculated to test for reliability for the following comparisons: between raters during the same testing session on the same day (inter-rater, intra-day, intra-session), between raters on different days (inter-rater, inter-day, inter-session), between days for the same rater (intra-rater, inter-day, inter-session), and between sessions on the same day by the same rater (intra-rater, intra-day, inter-session). Results: ICCs showed good to excellent reliability for all tests between days, raters, and sessions. Average doming strength was 99.96 ± 47.04 N. Average hallux flexion strength was 65.66 ± 24.5 N. Average lateral toe flexion was 50.96 ± 22.54 N. Conclusions: These simple tests using relatively low cost equipment can be used for research or clinical purposes. If repeated testing will be conducted on the same participant, it is suggested that the same researcher or clinician perform the testing each time for optimal reliability.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Muscle Strength/physiology
Muscle, Skeletal/physiology
Range of Motion, Articular/physiology
Toe Joint/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Fasciitis, Plantar/complications
Fasciitis, Plantar/physiopathology
Female
Foot/anatomy & histology
Foot/physiology
Hallux Valgus/complications
Hallux Valgus/physiopathology
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13047-017-0237-y

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[PMID]: 29381040
[Au] Autor:Carek PJ
[Ad] Address:University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100237, Gainesville, FL 32610-0237.
[Ti] Title:Foot and Ankle Conditions: Plantar Fasciitis.
[So] Source:FP Essent;465:11-17, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2159-3000
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain in adults. It involves painful symptoms occurring along the plantar fascia with or without the presence of a bony heel spur. Heel pain that occurs on standing after a prolonged non-weight-bearing period is a prominent symptom of plantar fasciitis. On physical examination, palpation along the medial plantar calcaneal region reproduces the painful symptoms. Routine imaging studies usually are not necessary but can be used to rule out pathologies or confirm chronic or recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The presence of a heel spur on x-ray is not thought to be an underlying cause of symptoms and indicates the condition has been present for at least 6 to 12 months. Conservative therapies such as rest, ice massage, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, specific plantar fascia stretching exercises, and orthoses are the preferred initial treatments. Injection therapies using a corticosteroid or platelet-rich plasma typically provide short-term relief. If conservative treatment is ineffective, extracorporeal shock wave therapy and surgery may be considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29260310
[Au] Autor:Uysal B
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Gulhane Training and Research Hospital, 06018, Etlik, Kecioren, Ankara, Turkey. drborauysal@windowslive.com.
[Ti] Title:Reply to letter to the editor about radiotherapy in the management of heel spur pain.
[So] Source:Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol;, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1633-8065
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00590-017-2106-6

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[PMID]: 29144771
[Au] Autor:Kim HJ; Kim JY; Kee YM; Rhee YG
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tears: Simple Versus Everted Type.
[So] Source:Am J Sports Med;:363546517739577, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-3365
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: No studies have focused on the everted type of bursal-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs). PURPOSE: To evaluate the radiological characteristics, arthroscopic findings, and clinical and structural outcomes after arthroscopic repair of the everted type of bursal-sided PTRCTs. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: Two groups of patients with bursal-sided PTRCTs (simple type, 25 shoulders; everted type, 25 shoulders) were enrolled. The mean age was 59.6 years (range, 47-73 years) and 60.8 years (range, 48-72 years) among patients with the simple and everted type, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 2.7 years (range, 2.0-5.1 years). RESULTS: The everted type always exhibited an acromial spur (hat-shaped, 52%; heel-shaped, 48%) and bony changes in the greater tuberosity (bony spur, 52%; sclerotic changes, 48%). Hat-shaped spurs of the acromion were not observed in the simple type. The everted type showed significantly thicker tendon on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as the stump was retracted superomedially (mean thickness: 8.1 ± 1.2 mm vs 5.5 ± 1.1 mm for the everted and simple type, respectively). During arthroscopic repair, additional sutures were needed more often for the everted type than for the simple type (64% vs 16%, respectively). After repair, the tendon margin was uneven and ragged in 16% of shoulders with the everted type. Preoperatively, the visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain during motion and range of motion (ROM) were significantly worse in patients with the everted type than in those with the simple type (VAS score, 7.2 vs 5.6, respectively; ROM for forward flexion, 146.8° vs 156.4°, respectively). Postoperatively, no significant differences in the VAS score, ROM, or clinical outcomes were observed between the 2 groups, with no retears on follow-up MRI in either group. CONCLUSION: The everted type of bursal-sided PTRCTs showed a characteristic hat-shaped acromion, often with bony spurs of the greater tuberosity. On MRI, the tendon stump appeared thickened because of the everted flap. The everted type was more likely to require additional sutures because of an uneven or ragged tendon margin. However, satisfactory clinical and structural outcomes were observed for both the simple and everted types.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0363546517739577

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[PMID]: 29095303
[Au] Autor:Yang WY; Han YH; Cao XW; Pan JK; Zeng LF; Lin JT; Liu J
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Orthopaedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine) bSecond School of Clinical Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.
[Ti] Title:Platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for plantar fasciitis: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(44):e8475, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used as an alternative therapy for plantar fasciitis (PF) to reduce heel pain and improve functional restoration. We evaluated the current evidence concerning the efficacy and safety of PRP as a treatment for PF compared with the efficacy and safety of steroid treatments. METHODS: Databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library) were searched from their establishment to January 30, 2017, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PRP with steroid injections as treatments for PF. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the methodological quality. Outcome measurements were the visual analogue scale (VAS), Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI), American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale, and the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS). The statistical analysis was performed with RevMan 5.3.5 software. RESULTS: Nine RCTs (n = 430) were included in this meta-analysis. Significant differences in the VAS were not observed between the 2 groups after 4 [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -1.10 to 2.23, P = .51, I = 89%] or 12 weeks of treatment (WMD = -0.49, 95% CI: -1.42 to 0.44, P = .30, I = 89%). However, PRP exhibited better efficacy than the steroid treatment after 24 weeks (WMD = -0.95, 95% CI: -1.80 to -0.11, P = .03, I = 85%). Moreover, no significant differences in the FADI, AOFAS, and RMS were observed between the 2 therapies (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Limited evidence supports the conclusion that PRP is superior to steroid treatments for long-term pain relief; however, significant differences were not observed between short and intermediate effects. Because of the small sample size and the limited number of high-quality RCTs, additional high-quality RCTs with larger sample sizes are required to validate this result.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fasciitis, Plantar/therapy
Pain Management/methods
Plasma Exchange/methods
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Steroids/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Fasciitis, Plantar/complications
Female
Heel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain/etiology
Pain Measurement
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Steroids)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008475

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[PMID]: 28891313
[Au] Autor:Rizk AS; Kandel WA; Tabl EAE; Kandil MI
[Ad] Address:1 Benha Faculty of Medicine, Benha University, Benha, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Mid-Sole Release of the Plantar Fascia Combined With Percutaneous Drilling of the Calcaneus for Treatment of Resistant Heel Pain.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Int;38(11):1271-1277, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1944-7876
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heel pain with or without calcaneal spur is a challenging problem. Once conservative measures have failed, surgery may be indicated; there has been debate about the best surgical procedure. Two standard operative procedures have been either releasing the plantar fascia or removing the spur with drilling of the calcaneus. In this study, we evaluated the results of percutaneous drilling of the calcaneus combined with mid-sole release of the plantar fascia for treatment of resistant heel pain. METHODS: This study included 20 cases with resistant heel pain after failure of conservative measures for 6 months. Clinical, radiological evaluation and scoring patients' conditions according to the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot scale was done preoperatively and postoperatively. Percutaneous drilling of the calcaneus combined with mid-sole release of the plantar fascia was done in all cases, and the functional results were evaluated through the follow-up period that extended from 9 to 16 months with a mean duration of 12 ± 2.3 months. RESULTS: There was statistically significant improvement in the mean AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale score from 50.8 ± 7.5 preoperatively to 91.6 ± 7 postoperatively at the last follow-up. There were no surgery-related complications, and the mean time for full recovery was 8 ± 3.7 weeks with no recurrence of pain by the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results were very satisfactory with using this minimally invasive and simple technique for treatment for resistant heel pain. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, retrospective case series.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/1071100717723131

  9 / 885 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28826948
[Au] Autor:Leucht AK; Wiewiorski M
[Ad] Address:Surgeon, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Kantonsspital Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Digit-Like Bony Anomaly of the Hindfoot: A Case Report.
[So] Source:J Foot Ankle Surg;, 2017 Aug 18.
[Is] ISSN:1542-2224
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of an asymptomatic digit-like bony anomaly located on the plantar aspect of the calcaneus, which was incidentally found on radiographs of a 50-year-old male with a tibial shaft fracture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of such an anomaly in the foot. The differential diagnosis includes accessory ossicles, polydactyly, heel spur, heterotopic ossification, osteochondroma, and pelvic digits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170822
[Lr] Last revision date:170822
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 885 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28708705
[Au] Autor:Njawaya MM; Moses B; Martens D; Orchard JJ; Driscoll T; Negrine J; Orchard JW
[Ad] Address:From the *Sydney East Sports Medicine and Orthopaedics, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; †The Sports Clinic, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; ‡Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; §Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; and ¶Orthosports, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Ultrasound Guidance Does Not Improve the Results of Shock Wave for Plantar Fasciitis or Calcific Achilles Tendinopathy: A Randomized Control Trial.
[So] Source:Clin J Sport Med;, 2017 Jul 11.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3724
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To establish whether the use of ultrasound to direct shock waves to the area of greater calcification in calcaneal enthesopathies was more effective than the common procedure of directing shock waves to the point where the patient has the most tenderness. DESIGN: Two-armed nonblinded randomized control trial with allocation concealment. SETTING: The Sports Clinic at Sydney University. PATIENTS: Participants 18 years or older with symptomatic plantar fasciitis (PF) (with heel spur) or calcific Achilles tendinopathy (CAT). Seventy-four of 82 cases completed treatment protocol and 6-month follow-up. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to receive either ultrasound-guided (UG) or patient-guided (PG) shock wave at weekly intervals over 3 to 5 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reduced pain on visual analog scale (VAS) and improved functional score on Maryland Foot Score (MFS) (for PF) or Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) (for CAT). Follow-up was at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Comparative 6-month improvements in MFS for the 47 PF cases were PG +20/100 and UG +14/100 (P = 0.20). Comparative 6-month improvement in VISA-A score for the 27 CAT cases were PG +35/100 and UG +27/100 (P = 0.37). Comparative (combined PF and CAT) 6-month improvement in VAS pain scores for all 38 PG cases were +38/100 with +37/100 for all 36 UG shock wave cases. CONCLUSIONS: Although both treatment groups had good clinical outcomes in this study, results for the 2 study groups were almost identical. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study shows that there is no major advantage in the addition of ultrasound for guiding shock waves when treating calcaneal enthesopathies (PF and CAT).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/JSM.0000000000000430


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