Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hemangiosarcoma [Words]
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[PMID]: 29311493
[Au] Autor:Maharani A; Aoshima K; Onishi S; Gulay KCM; Kobayashi A; Kimura T
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido 060-0818, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Cellular atypia is negatively correlated with immunohistochemical reactivity of CD31 and vWF expression levels in canine hemangiosarcoma.
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;80(2):213-218, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is one of the most common mesenchymal tumors in dogs. Its high metastatic and growth rates are usually associated with poor prognosis. Neoplastic cells of HSA can show various levels of cellular atypia in the same mass and may consist of various populations at different differentiated stages. Up to present, however, there is no report analyzing their differentiation states by comparing cellular atypia with differentiation-related protein expressions. To evaluate whether cellular atypia can be used as a differentiation marker in HSA, we analyzed correlation between cellular atypia and intensities of CD31 and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) staining in HSA cases. We also compared cellular atypia and expression levels of CD31 and vWF in each growth patterns. Our results show that cellular atypia was negatively correlated to CD31 and vWF expression levels but no significant correlation was found between growth patterns and cellular atypia or CD31 and vWF expression levels. Our study suggests that cellular atypia is useful for identifying differentiation levels in HSA cases. This study also provides useful information to determine differentiation levels of cell populations within HSA based only on morphological analysis, which will aid further HSA research such as identifying undifferentiation markers of endothelial cells or finding undifferentiated cell population in tissue sections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.17-0561

  2 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29157619
[Au] Autor:Szalat R; Munshi NC
[Ad] Address:Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, M230 Boston, MA 02215, USA.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of Castleman Disease.
[So] Source:Hematol Oncol Clin North Am;32(1):53-64, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1977
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogenous group of disorders sharing in common an abnormal lymph node pathology. CD comprises distinct subtypes with different prognoses. Unicentric CD and multicentric CD are featured by specific systemic manifestations and may be associated with Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma, and POEMS syndrome. Multicentric CD is classically associated with systemic symptoms and poorer prognosis. In this article, the authors review how to diagnose the disease, keeping in context the clinical findings, biochemical changes and complications associated with CD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Castleman Disease/diagnosis
Castleman Disease/pathology
Lymph Nodes/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Hodgkin Disease/diagnosis
Hodgkin Disease/pathology
Humans
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/diagnosis
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/pathology
POEMS Syndrome/diagnosis
POEMS Syndrome/pathology
Sarcoma, Kaposi/diagnosis
Sarcoma, Kaposi/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171122
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29408871
[Au] Autor:Kent MS; Burton JH; Dank G; Bannasch DL; Rebhun RB
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Association of cancer-related mortality, age and gonadectomy in golden retriever dogs at a veterinary academic center (1989-2016).
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192578, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Golden retriever dogs have been reported to have an increased prevalence of cancer compared to other breeds. There is also controversy over the effect spay or neuter status might have on longevity and the risk for developing cancer. The electronic medical records system at an academic center was searched for all dogs who had a necropsy exam from 1989-2016. 9,677 canine necropsy examinations were completed of which 655 were golden retrievers. Age was known for 652 with a median age of death 9.15 years. 424 of the 652 (65.0%) were determined to have died because of cancer. The median age for dying of a cause other than cancer was 6.93 years while those dying of cancer had a median age of 9.83 years (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in the proportion of intact males and castrated males dying of cancer (p = 0.43) but a greater proportion of spayed females died of cancer compared to intact females (p = 0.001). Intact female dogs had shorter life spans than spayed female dogs (p<0.0001), but there were no differences between intact and castrated males. Intriguingly, being spayed or neutered did not affect the risk of a cancer related death but increasing age did. The most common histologic diagnosis found in golden retrievers dying of cancer was hemangiosarcoma (22.64%) followed by lymphoid neoplasia (18.40%). Overall golden retriever dogs have a substantial risk of cancer related mortality in a referral population and age appears to have a larger effect on cancer related mortality than reproductive status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192578

  4 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456575
[Au] Autor:Grzesik P; MacMath D; Henson B; Prasad S; Joshi P; Desai PJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
[Ti] Title:Incorporation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus capsid vertex-specific component (CVSC) into self-assembled capsids.
[So] Source:Virus Res;236:9-13, 2017 05 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7492
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Self-assembly of herpesvirus capsids can be accomplished in heterologous expression systems provided all six capsid proteins are present. We have demonstrated the assembly of icosahedral Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. Using this self-assembly system we investigated whether we could add additional capsid associated proteins and determine their incorporation into the assembled capsid. We chose the capsid vertex-specific component (CVSC) proteins encoded by open reading frames (ORFs) 19 and 32 to test this. This complex sits on the capsid vertex and is important for capsid maturation in herpesvirus-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to initially confirm a bi-molecular interaction between ORF19 and ORF32. Both proteins also precipitated the triplex proteins of the capsid shell (ORF26 and ORF62) as well as the major capsid protein (ORF25). Capsid immunoprecipitation assays revealed the incorporation of ORF19 as well as ORF32 into assembled capsids. Similar experiments also showed that the incorporation of each protein occurred independent of the other. These studies reveal biochemically how the KSHV CVSC interacts with the capsid shell.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Capsid/metabolism
Herpesvirus 8, Human/physiology
Sarcoma, Kaposi/virology
Viral Proteins/metabolism
Virus Assembly
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Capsid Proteins/genetics
Capsid Proteins/metabolism
Herpesvirus 8, Human/genetics
Humans
Open Reading Frames
Viral Proteins/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Capsid Proteins); 0 (Viral Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29479033
[Au] Autor:Matsumoto M; Kano H; Suzuki M; Noguchi T; Umeda Y; Fukushima S
[Ti] Title:Carcinogenicity of quinoline by drinking-water administration in rats and mice.
[So] Source:J Toxicol Sci;43(2):113-127, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1880-3989
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The carcinogenicity of quinoline was examined by administrating quinoline in the drinking water to groups of 50 F344/DuCrj rats and 50 Crj: BDF1 mice of each sex. In rats, the doses of quinoline were 0, 200, 400, and 800 ppm for males and 0, 150, 300, and 600 ppm for females. In male rats, administration of quinoline was terminated at week 96 due to high mortality caused by tumors. There were significant increases of hepatocellular adenomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas (combined), and liver hemangiomas, hemangiosarcomas, hemangiomas and/or hemangiosarcomas (combined) in both male and female rats, and nasal esthesioneuroepitheliomas and sarcoma NOS (not otherwise specified) in males. In mice, doses of quinoline were 0, 150, 300 and 600 ppm for both males and females. Administration of quinoline was terminated at week 65 in males and at week 50 in females due to high mortality caused by tumors. There were marked increases of hemangiomas, hemangiosarcomas, and hemangiomas and/or hemangiosarcomas (combined) in the retroperitoneum, mesenterium, and liver in males, and in the retroperitoneum, mesenterium, peritoneum, and subcutis in females. Additionally, histiocytic sarcomas were statistically increased in the livers of female mice. Thus the present studies provided clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of quinoline administered in the drinking water in both rats and mice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2131/jts.43.113

  6 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468596
[Au] Autor:Gloghini A; Volpi CC; Gualeni AV; Dolcetti R; Bongarzone I; De Paoli P; Carbone A
[Ad] Address:a Molecular Pathology, Department of Diagnostic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine , Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori , Milano , Italy.
[Ti] Title:Multiple viral infections in primary effusion lymphoma: a model of viral cooperation in lymphomagenesis.
[So] Source:Expert Rev Hematol;10(6):505-514, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1747-4094
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare B-cell lymphoid neoplasm mainly associated with HIV infection, presenting as pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial effusions. A defining property of PEL is its consistent association with Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, and, in most cases, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) co-infection. On these grounds, a review of the literature related to viral cooperation and lymphomagenesis can help to understand the complex interplay between KSHV and EBV in PEL pathogenesis. Areas covered: In this review, the authors highlight clinical, pathologic, genetic and proteomic features of PEL, in the context of viral cooperation in PEL lymphomagenesis. Expert commentary: Tumour cells are characterized by the overexpression of genes that are involved in inflammation and invasion. Coherently, PEL secretomes are enriched in proteins probably responsible for the particular tropism (cell adhesion and migration) of PEL cells. The development of PEL in HIV+ patients is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay among co-infection with oncogenic viruses (EBV and KSHV), inflammatory factors, and environmental conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Transformation, Viral
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Herpesvirus 4, Human
Herpesvirus 8, Human
Lymphoma, Primary Effusion
Sarcoma, Kaposi
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/genetics
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/metabolism
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/pathology
Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics
Herpesvirus 4, Human/metabolism
Herpesvirus 8, Human/genetics
Herpesvirus 8, Human/metabolism
Humans
Lymphoma, Primary Effusion/metabolism
Lymphoma, Primary Effusion/pathology
Lymphoma, Primary Effusion/virology
Sarcoma, Kaposi/genetics
Sarcoma, Kaposi/metabolism
Sarcoma, Kaposi/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17474086.2017.1326815

  7 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27772621
[Au] Autor:Le J
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. Electronic address: jade.le@utsouthwestern.edu.
[Ti] Title:Oncogenic γ Herpesviruses EBV and HHV8 in Kidney Transplantation.
[So] Source:Semin Nephrol;36(5):362-371, 2016 09.
[Is] ISSN:1558-4488
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) are γ herpesviruses associated with post-transplant malignancies in kidney transplant recipients. EBV is associated with post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), with increased risk in EBV-seronegative patients on intensified immunosuppression. Human herpesvirus-8 is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), with an increased risk in certain patient populations. Diagnosis of PTLD and KS relies on tissue biopsy. The mainstay of therapy for both PTLD and Kaposi's sarcoma is a reduction of immunosuppression, and in the case of PTLD, consideration of rituximab. Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery is provided for disseminated or recalcitrant disease. The prognoses vary depending on the type of malignancy identified and stage of disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/chemically induced
Graft Rejection/prevention & control
Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects
Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Lymphoproliferative Disorders/chemically induced
Sarcoma, Kaposi/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/diagnosis
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/drug therapy
Herpesviridae Infections/chemically induced
Herpesviridae Infections/diagnosis
Herpesviridae Infections/therapy
Herpesviridae Infections/virology
Herpesvirus 4, Human
Herpesvirus 8, Human
Humans
Lymphoproliferative Disorders/diagnosis
Lymphoproliferative Disorders/therapy
Lymphoproliferative Disorders/virology
Radiotherapy
Rituximab/therapeutic use
Sarcoma, Kaposi/diagnosis
Sarcoma, Kaposi/therapy
Sarcoma, Kaposi/virology
Surgical Procedures, Operative
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological); 0 (Immunosuppressive Agents); 4F4X42SYQ6 (Rituximab)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390446
[Au] Autor:Corrias G; Escalon JG; Tang L; Monti S; Saba L; Mannelli L
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, York Avenue, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Hepatic angiosarcomatous transformation of a mediastinal germinal cell tumor: A care case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(51):e9152, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Mediastinal nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) is an uncommon entity. Metastatic hepatic sarcomatous transformation is rare. PATIENT CONCERNS: We report a 24-year-old man with no previous related medical history presented with chest pain and left arm numbness. DIAGNOSES: The x-ray showed an anterior mediastinal mass. The chest computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a mildly enhancing mass in the same location, without invasion of any vascular structure. A CT-guided biopsy was performed, revealing a primary mediastinal nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT), yolk sac histology, with areas of somatic transformation to malignant nerve sheath tumor. After surgery patient was followed-up with imaging. Two years later a CT scan showed a new hepatic hyper vascular lesion, confirmed by a subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scan. A CT-guided biopsy revealed a hepatic metastatic transformation to angiosarcoma of the primitive NSGCT. INTERVENTIONS: The patient went on to received palliative chemotherapy. OUTCOMES: The patient is being followed-up regularly at the outpatient department. LESSONS: Because of the potential of metastatic sarcoma arising from germ cell tumors, these patients should undergo periodical follow-up, with periodical scans. PET\CT scan might have a role in the follow-up of these patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Hemangiosarcoma/pathology
Liver Neoplasms/pathology
Mediastinal Neoplasms/pathology
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnostic Imaging
Hemangiosarcoma/diagnostic imaging
Humans
Liver Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/diagnostic imaging
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009152

  9 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29384936
[Au] Autor:Marino D; Calabrese F; Ottaviano G; La Torre FB; Vicario M; Alaibac M; Calabrò ML
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV IRCCS.
[Ti] Title:Recurrent Kaposi sarcoma associated with Koebner phenomenon in two HIV-seronegative patients: Two case reports and a review of the literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(52):e9467, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Koebner phenomenon is occasionally reported in patients affected by classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS). PATIENT CONCERNS: Here, we report 2 cases of KS associated with Koebner phenomenon and the correlation of human herpesvirus 8 molecular analysis with the clinical outcome. INTERVENTIONS: In the first case, a patient with a history of sporadic cutaneous KS developed a recurrent lesion at the laryngeal tract, the site of a previous nodulectomy. In our second case, immunodeficiency induced by chemotherapy triggered the development of KS and Koebner phenomenon was limited to the skin at the site of safenectomy. LESSONS: Our observations suggest that careful planning of surgical treatment is required in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients with a medical history of KS. Moreover, mucosal sites (both respiratory and in the gastrointestinal tract) should be considered as potential sites for KS development.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Herpesvirus 8, Human
Sarcoma, Kaposi/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms/complications
HIV Seronegativity
Hepatitis B/complications
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Sarcoma, Kaposi/complications
Sarcoma, Kaposi/virology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009467

  10 / 15691 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29384853
[Au] Autor:Chen X; Li H; Wang F; Liu H
[Ad] Address:Department of General Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Early detection and integral resection are keys to extend survival in patients suffered from primary angiosarcoma of the spleen: A care-compliant case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(5):e9718, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Primary angiosarcoma of the spleen (PAS) is a very rare malignant neoplasm that originates from endothelial cells of the splenic blood vessels. Without typical clinical presentations and specific radiological features, PAS is very difficult to be early identified and 1-year mortality is extremely high. Late detection and spleen rupture are considered as the most important risk factors for early metastasis. PATIENT CONCERNS: Without any obvious symptom, a 35-year-old woman was admitted with splenic neoplasm that was accidentally discovered through a routine physical examination. DIAGNOSES: The patient was first diagnosed as lymphoma by laboratory tests and imaging studies, but changed to PAS by histological examinations after the surgery. INTERVENTIONS: After careful preoperational assessment, a laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy was scrutinously performed and the entire spleen was removed without any rupture. OUTCOMES: The postoperative followed-up was uneventful until 3 years later, when she sought medical attention due to persisting back pain. Bone metastasis was consequently identified and the symptom was quickly alleviated after radiation therapy. However, intra-abdominal metastases leading to intestinal obstruction occurred 4.5 years after surgery. Following short palliative treatment, the patient passed away 4 years and 9 months after the operation due to multiple organ failure. LESSONS: PAS is an uncommon and aggressive splenic disease. Once suspected, PAS require prompt and precise surgical procedures to remove the tumor origin. Laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy was technically feasible and therapeutically harmless for PAS treatment compared with open surgery as long as the spleen was removed intact. However, more evaluation of this option will be needed due to limited experience by now. Early discovery, precautious plan, meticulous operation, close follow-up, and comprehensive treatment may significantly prolong the living period of this fatal disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hemangiosarcoma/diagnosis
Hemangiosarcoma/surgery
Splenic Neoplasms/diagnosis
Splenic Neoplasms/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Early Diagnosis
Fatal Outcome
Female
Hemangiosarcoma/pathology
Hemangiosarcoma/radiotherapy
Humans
Incidental Findings
Lymphoma/diagnosis
Splenic Neoplasms/pathology
Splenic Neoplasms/radiotherapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009718


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