Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hematopoiesis [Words]
References found : 31600 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 3160 go to page                         

  1 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29505034
[Au] Autor:Zhang B; Nguyen LXT; Li L; Zhao D; Kumar B; Wu H; Lin A; Pellicano F; Hopcroft L; Su YL; Copland M; Holyoake TL; Kuo CJ; Bhatia R; Snyder DS; Ali H; Stein AS; Brewer C; Wang H; McDonald T; Swiderski P; Troadec E; Chen CC; Dorrance A; Pullarkat V; Yuan YC; Perrotti D; Carlesso N; Forman SJ; Kortylewski M; Kuo YH; Marcucci G
[Ad] Address:Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research, Hematology Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA.
[Ti] Title:Bone marrow niche trafficking of miR-126 controls the self-renewal of leukemia stem cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia.
[So] Source:Nat Med;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1546-170X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in individuals with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (hereafter referred to as CML LSCs) are responsible for initiating and maintaining clonal hematopoiesis. These cells persist in the bone marrow (BM) despite effective inhibition of BCR-ABL kinase activity by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here we show that although the microRNA (miRNA) miR-126 supported the quiescence, self-renewal and engraftment capacity of CML LSCs, miR-126 levels were lower in CML LSCs than in long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) from healthy individuals. Downregulation of miR-126 levels in CML LSCs was due to phosphorylation of Sprouty-related EVH1-domain-containing 1 (SPRED1) by BCR-ABL, which led to inhibition of the RAN-exportin-5-RCC1 complex that mediates miRNA maturation. Endothelial cells (ECs) in the BM supply miR-126 to CML LSCs to support quiescence and leukemia growth, as shown using mouse models of CML in which Mir126a (encoding miR-126) was conditionally knocked out in ECs and/or LSCs. Inhibition of BCR-ABL by TKI treatment caused an undesired increase in endogenous miR-126 levels, which enhanced LSC quiescence and persistence. Mir126a knockout in LSCs and/or ECs, or treatment with a miR-126 inhibitor that targets miR-126 expression in both LSCs and ECs, enhanced the in vivo anti-leukemic effects of TKI treatment and strongly diminished LSC leukemia-initiating capacity, providing a new strategy for the elimination of LSCs in individuals with CML.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/nm.4499

  2 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29500307
[Au] Autor:Maryanovich M; Takeishi S; Frenette PS
[Ad] Address:Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461.
[Ti] Title:Neural Regulation of Bone and Bone Marrow.
[So] Source:Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:2157-1422
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bones provide both skeletal scaffolding and space for hematopoiesis in its marrow. Previous work has shown that these functions were tightly regulated by the nervous system. The central and peripheral nervous systems tightly regulate compact bone remodeling, its metabolism, and hematopoietic homeostasis in the bone marrow (BM). Accumulating evidence indicates that the nervous system, which fine-tunes inflammatory responses and alterations in neural functions, may regulate autoimmune diseases. Neural signals also influence the progression of hematological malignancies such as acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. Here, we review the interplay of the nervous system with bone, BM, and immunity, and discuss future challenges to target hematological diseases through modulation of activity of the nervous system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29463696
[Au] Autor:Zhang H; Li HS; Hillmer EJ; Zhao Y; Chrisikos TT; Hu H; Wu X; Thompson EJ; Clise-Dwyer K; Millerchip KA; Wei Y; Puebla-Osorio N; Kaushik S; Santos MA; Wang B; Garcia-Manero G; Wang J; Sun SC; Watowich SS
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030.
[Ti] Title:Genetic rescue of lineage-balanced blood cell production reveals a crucial role for STAT3 antiinflammatory activity in hematopoiesis.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;115(10):E2311-E2319, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Blood cell formation must be appropriately maintained throughout life to provide robust immune function, hemostasis, and oxygen delivery to tissues, and to prevent disorders that result from over- or underproduction of critical lineages. Persistent inflammation deregulates hematopoiesis by damaging hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to elevated myeloid cell output and eventual bone marrow failure. Nonetheless, antiinflammatory mechanisms that protect the hematopoietic system are understudied. The transcriptional regulator STAT3 has myriad roles in HSPC-derived populations and nonhematopoietic tissues, including a potent antiinflammatory function in differentiated myeloid cells. STAT3 antiinflammatory activity is facilitated by STAT3-mediated transcriptional repression of , which encodes the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13 involved in proinflammatory signaling. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for STAT3 antiinflammatory activity in preservation of HSPCs and lineage-balanced hematopoiesis. Conditional removal from the hematopoietic system led to depletion of the bone marrow lineage Sca-1 c-Kit CD150 CD48 HSPC subset (LSK CD150 CD48 cells), myeloid-skewed hematopoiesis, and accrual of DNA damage in HSPCs. These responses were accompanied by intrinsic transcriptional alterations in HSPCs, including deregulation of inflammatory, survival and developmental pathways. Concomitant /Ubc13 deletion from -deficient hematopoietic cells enabled lineage-balanced hematopoiesis, mitigated depletion of bone marrow LSK CD150 CD48 cells, alleviated HSPC DNA damage, and corrected a majority of aberrant transcriptional responses. These results indicate an intrinsic protective role for STAT3 in the hematopoietic system, and suggest that this is mediated by STAT3-dependent restraint of excessive proinflammatory signaling via Ubc13 modulation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1713889115

  4 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29343445
[Au] Autor:Li Z; Hardij J; Bagchi DP; Scheller EL; MacDougald OA
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
[Ti] Title:Development, regulation, metabolism and function of bone marrow adipose tissues.
[So] Source:Bone;110:134-140, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most adipocytes exist in discrete depots throughout the body, notably in well-defined white and brown adipose tissues. However, adipocytes also reside within specialized niches, of which the most abundant is within bone marrow. Whereas bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) shares many properties in common with white adipose tissue, the distinct functions of BMAT are reflected by its development, regulation, protein secretion, and lipid composition. In addition to its potential role as a local energy reservoir, BMAT also secretes proteins, including adiponectin, RANK ligand, dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and stem cell factor, which contribute to local marrow niche functions and which may also influence global metabolism. The characteristics of BMAT are also distinct depending on whether marrow adipocytes are contained within yellow or red marrow, as these can be thought of as 'constitutive' and 'regulated', respectively. The rBMAT for instance can be expanded or depleted by myriad factors, including age, nutrition, endocrine status and pharmaceuticals. Herein we review the site specificity, age-related development, regulation and metabolic characteristics of BMAT under various metabolic conditions, including the functional interactions with bone and hematopoietic cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29288703
[Au] Autor:Serrano-Lopez J; Nattamai K; Pease NA; Shephard MS; Wellendorf AM; Sertorio M; Smith EA; Geiger H; Wells SI; Cancelas JA; Privette Vinnedge LM
[Ad] Address:Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.
[Ti] Title:Loss of DEK induces radioresistance of murine restricted hematopoietic progenitors.
[So] Source:Exp Hematol;59:40-50.e3, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2399
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent progenitor cells are responsible for maintaining hematopoiesis throughout an individual's lifetime. For overall health and survival, it is critical that the genome stability of these cells is maintained and that the cell population is not exhausted. Previous reports have indicated that the DEK protein, a chromatin structural protein that functions in numerous nuclear processes, is required for DNA damage repair in vitro and long-term engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the role of DEK in normal hematopoiesis and response to DNA damaging agents in vivo. Here, we report that hematopoiesis is largely unperturbed in DEK knockout mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. However, DEK knockout mice have fewer radioprotective units, but increased capacity to survive repeated sublethal doses of radiation exposure compared with WT mice. Furthermore, this increased survival correlated with a sustained quiescent state in which DEK knockout restricted hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC-1) were nearly three times more likely to be quiescent following irradiation compared with WT cells and were significantly more radioresistant during the early phases of myeloid reconstitution. Together, our studies indicate that DEK functions in the normal hematopoietic stress response to recurrent radiation exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523959
[Au] Autor:Steinberg M; Gaut JP; Hmiel SP; Kakajiwala A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, USA.
[Ti] Title:The light at the end of the tunnel: an unusual case of acute kidney injury in a pediatric patient: Answers.
[So] Source:Pediatr Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-198X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monoclonal gammopathies are a rare diagnosis in pediatric patients. A 19-year-old female patient with past medical history of hypogammaglobulinemia and natural killer cell deficiency and stage III follicular lymphoma, in remission, presented with a right-sided pneumonia, noted to have acute kidney injury and proteinuria. Complement C3 and C4 levels were normal. Anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were negative. A renal biopsy showed numerous fractured tubular casts that were periodic acid-Schiff and silver-stain negative and fuchsinophilic on trichrome stain, with associated giant cells, tubulitis, acute tubular injury, and tubular rupture. The tubular casts had 3+ staining for lambda light chains and 0-1+ staining for kappa light chains. These findings were consistent with light chain cast nephropathy (LCCN). Serum free light chains, serum immunofixation, urine protein electrophoresis, and urine immunofixation studies supported the renal biopsy diagnosis of LCCN. A bone marrow biopsy showed normal trilineage hematopoiesis and also revealed an atypical B cell population detected by flow cytometry. Pathology specimens from lesions in the distal small bowel were characteristic of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Chemoreduction therapy followed by chemotherapy was initiated for the DLBCL. Three months after initiation of chemotherapy, the patient's creatinine has improved by > 50%. The likely cause of her LCCN was the new diagnosis of a DLBCL. Other risk factors include her history of hypogammaglobulinemia, natural killer (NK) cell deficiency, community-acquired pneumonia, and prior follicular lymphoma. Our patient may be the youngest reported case of LCCN. Treatment of LCCN is based on treating the underlying clonal plasma cell or B cell proliferation, typically with chemotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00467-018-3930-6

  7 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523881
[Au] Autor:Wang YY; Ma S; Chen Q; Jiao D; Yang Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, China. wangyy@hdu.edu.cn.
[Ti] Title:In vivo selection with lentiviral expression of Bcl2 mutant in hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted mice.
[So] Source:Gene Ther;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5462
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Current in vivo selections for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-based gene therapy are drug dependent and not without risk of cytotoxicity or tumorigenesis. We developed a new in vivo selection system with the non-phosphorylatable Bcl2 mutant Bcl2 (Bcl2 ), which makes in vivo selection drug independent and without risk of cytotoxicity or tumorigenesis. We demonstrated in HSC-transplanted mice that Bcl2 facilitated efficient in vivo selection in the absence of any exogenously applied drugs under both myeloablative and non-myeloablative conditioning. In mice transplanted with retrovirally transduced sca-1-positive bone marrow cells, the marked cell level increased from 26.38% of input transduced cells to 92.61 ± 0.95% of peripheral blood cells for myeloablative transplantation or to 37.82 ± 6.35% for non-myeloablative transplantation 6 months after transplantation. Bcl2 did not induce tumorigenesis and does not influence hematopoiesis and the function of the reconstituted blood system. However, the high-level constitutive expression of Bcl2 mediated by retroviral vector induced exhaustion of the marked cells after tertiary transplantation. Fortunately, low-level constitutive expression of Bcl2 driven by an internal promoter in lentiviral vector could both maintain the marked cell level (24.13 ± 5.27%, 27.17 ± 5.51%, 24.33 ± 5.08%, and 22.07 ± 4.44% for primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary recipients) and avoid the exhaustion of the marked cells even in quaternary recipients. Importantly, the low-level constitutive expression of Bcl2 did not induce tumorigenesis. Thus, the in vivo selection employing the low-level constitutive expression of Bcl2 provides a general platform which is relevant for widespread applications of gene therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41434-018-0008-9

  8 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523528
[Au] Autor:Øvlisen AK; Oest A; Bendtsen MD; Bæch J; Johansen P; Lynggaard LS; Mølle I; Mortensen TB; Weber D; Ertner G; Schöllkopf C; Thomassen JQ; Nielsen OJ; Østgård LSG; Bøgsted M; Dybkær K; Johnsen HE; Severinsen MT
[Ad] Address:Department of Haematology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Stringent or nonstringent complete remission and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia: a Danish population-based study.
[So] Source:Blood Adv;2(5):559-564, 2018 Mar 13.
[Is] ISSN:2473-9537
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stringent complete remission (sCR) of acute myeloid leukemia is defined as normal hematopoiesis after therapy. Less sCR, including non-sCR, was introduced as insufficient blood platelet, neutrophil, or erythrocyte recovery. These latter characteristics were defined retrospectively as postremission transfusion dependency and were suggested to be of prognostic value. In the present report, we evaluated the prognostic impact of achieving sCR and non-sCR in the Danish National Acute Leukaemia Registry, including 769 patients registered with classical CR (ie, <5% blasts in the postinduction bone marrow analysis). Individual patients were classified as having sCR (n = 360; 46.8%) or non-sCR (n = 409; 53.2%) based on data from our national laboratory and transfusion databases. Survival analysis revealed that patients achieving sCR had superior overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.64) as well as relapse-free survival (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03-1.51) compared with those with non-sCR after adjusting for covariates. Cox regression analysis regarding the impact of the stringent criteria for blood cell recovery identified these as significant and independent variables. In conclusion, this real-life register study supports the international criteria for response evaluation on prognosis and, most importantly, documents each of the 3 lineage recovery criteria as contributing independently.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1182/bloodadvances.2017007393

  9 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29505518
[Au] Autor:Zhang S; Huang Q; Xu B; Ma J; Cao G; Pei F
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness and safety of an optimized blood management program in total hip and knee arthroplasty: A large, single-center, retrospective study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9429, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Little has been published on blood management in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA, respectively) patients focusing on both hematopoiesis and hemostasis. Our aim was to explore the effectiveness and safety of an optimized blood management program in THA and TKA patients in a large, single-center, retrospective study.We retrospectively reviewed consecutive primary unilateral THA and TKA patients' data at our institution through the National Health Database. They were divided into 3 groups according to an optimized blood management program: group A-combined use of intravenous and topical tranexamic acid (TXA); group B-use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and iron supplements in addition to treatments in group A; group C-use of additional multiple boluses of TXA in addition to treatments in group B. The primary outcomes were hemoglobin (Hb) drop and calculated total blood loss (TBL). Other outcome measurements such as transfusion rate, postoperative length of stay (PLOS), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and mortality were also compared.From 2014 to 2016, a total of 1907 unilateral THA (986 in group A, 745 in group B, and 176 in group C) and 1505 unilateral TKA (795 in group A, 556 in group B, and 154 in group C) procedures were conducted at our institution. The Hb drop, calculated TBL, and PLOS in group C were significantly lower than those in groups A and B for THA and TKA patients. The transfusion rate in group C was also significantly less than in groups A and B for THA patients, while it was similar in groups A and B for TKA patients. No patients in group C received a transfusion. A significant difference was not detected in the incidence of deep vein thrombosis. No episode of symptomatic pulmonary embolism or all-cause mortality occurred within 30 days postoperatively.The current retrospective study suggests that for patients receiving primary unilateral THA or TKA, multiple boluses of intravenous TXA combined with topical TXA, rHuEPO, and iron supplements can reduce the calculated TBL, Hb drop, transfusion rate, and PLOS without increasing the incidence of VTE or mortality.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia/drug therapy
Antifibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage
Blood Loss, Surgical/prevention & control
Erythropoietin/therapeutic use
Iron/therapeutic use
Trace Elements/therapeutic use
Tranexamic Acid/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Administration, Intravenous
Administration, Topical
Adult
Aged
Anemia/etiology
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifibrinolytic Agents); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 0 (Trace Elements); 11096-26-7 (Erythropoietin); 6T84R30KC1 (Tranexamic Acid); E1UOL152H7 (Iron)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009429

  10 / 31600 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29453226
[Au] Autor:Abarrategi A; Mian SA; Passaro D; Rouault-Pierre K; Grey W; Bonnet D
[Ad] Address:Haematopoietic Stem Cell Laboratory, The Francis Crick Institute, London, England, UK.
[Ti] Title:Modeling the human bone marrow niche in mice: From host bone marrow engraftment to bioengineering approaches.
[So] Source:J Exp Med;215(3):729-743, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1540-9538
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Xenotransplantation of patient-derived samples in mouse models has been instrumental in depicting the role of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in the establishment as well as progression of hematological malignancies. The foundations for this field of research have been based on the development of immunodeficient mouse models, which provide normal and malignant human hematopoietic cells with a supportive microenvironment. Immunosuppressed and genetically modified mice expressing human growth factors were key milestones in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, highlighting the importance of developing humanized microenvironments. The latest major improvement has been the use of human bone marrow (BM) niche-forming cells to generate human-mouse chimeric BM tissues in PDXs, which can shed light on the interactions between human stroma and hematopoietic cells. Here, we summarize the methods used for human hematopoietic cell xenotransplantation and their milestones and review the latest approaches in generating humanized BM tissues in mice to study human normal and malignant hematopoiesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1084/jem.20172139


page 1 of 3160 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information