Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hemiplegia [Words]
References found : 11772 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1178 go to page                         

  1 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25372646
[Au] Autor:Zhang R; Chen W; Hu Q; Shrestha S
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Shaoxing Peoples Hospital, Shaoxing 312000, China;College of Optometry, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325027, China....
[Ti] Title:[Adult Sturge-Weber syndrome without facial hemangioma:report of one case].
[So] Source:Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban;43(5):588-90, 2014 Sep 25.
[Is] ISSN:1008-9292
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is characterized by angiomas affecting the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, epilepsy, intellectual impairment, hemiplegia and glaucoma. We report a patient who developed SWS without facial hemangioma (SWS type Ⅲ) in his adulthood. The patient presented with repeated episodes of headache since age 37 year. He manifested first attack of seizure at the age 47 year followed by aphasia and right upper limb palsy. Brain CT scan revealed right parietal-occipital calcification, brain CT angiography showed right temporal lobe and occipital lobe vascular malformation, and MRI showed leptomeningeal enhancement in the riht cerebral piamater. The seizure was controlled with antiepileptic drugs and reviewed in routine follow up.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24087981
[Au] Autor:Camerota F; Galli M; Cimolin V; Celletti C; Ancillao A; Blow D; Albertini G
[Ad] Address:Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Division, Orthopaedic Department, Umberto I Hospital, Sapienza University , Rome , Italy .
[Ti] Title:Neuromuscular taping for the upper limb in Cerebral Palsy: A case study in a patient with hemiplegia.
[So] Source:Dev Neurorehabil;17(6):384-7, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1751-8431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Abstract Objective: To assess quantitatively the effects of Neuromuscular Taping (NMT) on the upper limb in a female child with left hemiplegia, due to Cerebral Palsy (CP). METHODS: The patient underwent NMT on cervical level, shoulder and hand only of the plegic upper limb, followed by physical therapy. Kinematic data of upper limbs during reaching task were collected before (PRE) and after 2 weeks of treatment (POST). RESULTS: After the intervention, the affected limb improved in terms of movement duration, Average Jerk and Number of Unit Movements indices, indicating a faster, smoother and less segmented movement. Improvements appeared at the ranges of motion of the upper limb joints, both at shoulder and elbow joints. No significant changes were globally displayed for the unaffected arm. CONCLUSION: NMT seems to be a promising intervention for improving upper limb movement in patients with CP. Further investigations are certainly needed to assess effectively the effects of the intervention in this pathological state.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/17518423.2013.830152

  3 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 25327107
[Au] Autor:Ola V; Mathur G; Sihag B; Meel JK; Sirohi P; Agrawal RP
[Ti] Title:Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome.
[So] Source:J Assoc Physicians India;62(1):83-4, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0004-5772
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebrum/pathology
Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic/complications
Hemiplegia/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Atrophy
Cerebral Ventricles/pathology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Syndrome
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141020
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 24651209
[Au] Autor:Casale R; Damiani C; Maestri R; Fundar C; Chimento P; Foti C
[Ad] Address:Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Pavia, Italy - roberto.casale@fsm.it.
[Ti] Title:Localized 100 Hz vibration improves function and reduces upper limb spasticity: a double-blind controlled study.
[So] Source:Eur J Phys Rehabil Med;50(5):495-504, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1973-9095
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Physical modalities such as vibration has been suggested as possible non-pharmacological way to control spasticity. AIMS: The hypotheses tested were: 1) can a selective vibration of the upper limb flexor antagonist, triceps brachii, reduce the spasticity of the flexor biceps brachii muscle; 2) is its association with physiotherapy better than physiotherapy alone in reducing spasticity and improving function, 3) can this possible effect last for longer than the stimulation period. DESIGN: Randomized double-blind study. SETTING: Rehabilitation Institute, inward patients. POPULATION: Thirty hemiplegic patients affected by upper limb spasticity. METHOD: (VIB + PT) group received physiotherapy plus vibration by means of a pneumatic vibrator applied over the belly of the triceps brachii of the spastic side (contact surface 2 cm2; frequency 100 Hz; amplitude 2 mm; mean pressure 250 mBar). (SHAM + PT) group received physiotherapy and sham vibration. Both groups had 60 minutes of physiotherapy (Kabat techniques) for 5 days a week (from Monday to Friday) for 2 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ashworth modified scale for spasticity and robot-aided motor tasks changes for functional modifications were evaluated before starting treatment (T0), 48 hours after the fifth session (T1) and 48 hours after the last session (T2). RESULTS: Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant greater improvements in the (VIB + PT) group (P=0.0001) compared to in the (SHAM + PT) group after 1 week, as well as after 2 weeks of treatment (P=0.0078) at the Ashworth scale. CONCLUSION: 1) 100 Hz vibration applied to the triceps brachii of a spastic upper limb in association with physiotherapy is able to reduce the spasticity of the flexor agonist, biceps brachii; 2) this association is better than physiotherapy alone in controlling spasticity and improving function; 3) this clinically perceivable reduction of spasticity and function improvement extends (for at least 48 hours) beyond the period of application of the vibration, supporting its possible role in the rehabilitation of spastic hemiplegia. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: 100 Hz antagonist muscle vibration, a non-pharmacological treatment, can help physiotherapy to reduce flexors spasticity and improve functions in the rehabilitation of upper limb spasticity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text

[PMID]: 25306125
[Au] Autor:Calabr RS; Reitano S; Leo A; De Luca R; Melegari C; Bramanti P
[Ti] Title:Can robot-assisted movement training (Lokomat) improve functional recovery and psychological well-being in chronic stroke? Promising findings from a case study.
[So] Source:Funct Neurol;29(2):139-41, 2014 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1971-3274
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Lokomat is a robotic device that has been widely used for gait rehabilitation in several neurological disorders, with a positive effect also in the chronic phase. We describe the case of a 54-yearold female with post-stroke moderate-to-severe chronic hemiplegia, whose force, gait and balance significantly improved after intensive training with Lokomat Pro. We also noted a positive impact of Lokomat on mood and coping styles. This may be partly related to the task-oriented exercises with computerized visual feedback, which in turn can be considered an important tool for increasing patients' motor output, involvement and motivation during gait training. Augmented feedback during robot-assisted gait appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function, but also of improving psychological and cognitive status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 24528276
[Au] Autor:Basu AP
[Ad] Address:Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
[Ti] Title:Early intervention after perinatal stroke: opportunities and challenges.
[So] Source:Dev Med Child Neurol;56(6):516-21, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8749
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Perinatal stroke is the most common cause of hemiplegic cerebral palsy. No standardized early intervention exists despite evidence for a critical time window for activity-dependent plasticity to mould corticospinal tract development in the first few years of life. Intervention during this unique period of plasticity could mitigate the consequences of perinatal stroke to an extent not possible with later intervention, by preserving the normal pattern of development of descending motor pathways. This article outlines the broad range of approaches currently under investigation. Despite significant progress in this area, improved early detection and outcome prediction remain important goals.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebral Palsy/congenital
Cerebral Palsy/rehabilitation
Early Medical Intervention
Hemiplegia/congenital
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Stroke/congenital
Stroke/rehabilitation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cerebral Palsy/diagnosis
Cerebral Palsy/physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Models, Animal
Early Diagnosis
Exercise Movement Techniques
Hemiplegia/diagnosis
Hemiplegia/physiopathology
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Neuronal Plasticity/physiology
Prognosis
Pyramidal Tracts/physiopathology
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stroke/diagnosis
Stroke/physiopathology
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Translational Medical Research
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Cu] Class update date: 141104
[Lr] Last revision date:141104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140509
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/dmcn.12407

  7 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24590225
[Au] Autor:Mukaino M; Ono T; Shindo K; Fujiwara T; Ota T; Kimura A; Liu M; Ushiba J
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, 078-8510 Asahikawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of brain-computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation for chronic paresis after stroke.
[So] Source:J Rehabil Med;46(4):378-82, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1651-2081
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Brain computer interface technology is of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic measure for people with severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of brain computer interface, by comparing conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and brain computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation, using an A-B-A-B withdrawal single-subject design. METHODS: A 38-year-old male with severe hemiplegia due to a putaminal haemorrhage participated in this study. The design involved 2 epochs. In epoch A, the patient attempted to open his fingers during the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, irrespective of his actual brain activity. In epoch B, neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied only when a significant motor-related cortical potential was observed in the electroencephalogram. RESULTS: The subject initially showed diffuse functional magnetic resonance imaging activation and small electro-encephalogram responses while attempting finger movement. Epoch A was associated with few neurological or clinical signs of improvement. Epoch B, with a brain computer interface, was associated with marked lateralization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and blood oxygenation level dependent responses. Voluntary electromyogram (EMG) activity, with significant EEG-EMG coherence, was also prompted. Clinical improvement in upper-extremity function and muscle tone was observed. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that self-directed training with a brain computer interface may induce activity- dependent cortical plasticity and promote functional recovery. This preliminary clinical investigation encourages further research using a controlled design.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain-Computer Interfaces
Electric Stimulation
Hemiplegia/etiology
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Putaminal Hemorrhage/complications
Stroke/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Chronic Disease
Electromyography
Fingers/physiopathology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Movement/physiology
Putaminal Hemorrhage/diagnosis
Recovery of Function/physiology
Stroke/diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
Upper Extremity/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140331
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2340/16501977-1785

  8 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25333602
[Au] Autor:Brugger P; Lenggenhager B
[Ad] Address:aNeuropsychology Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich bZIHP, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:The bodily self and its disorders: neurological, psychological and social aspects.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Neurol;27(6):644-52, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6551
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The experience of ourselves as an embodied agent with a first-person perspective is referred to as 'bodily self'. We present a selective overview of relevant clinical and experimental studies. RECENT FINDINGS: Sharing multisensory body space with others can be observed in patients with structurally altered bodies (amputations, congenital absence of limbs), with altered functionality after hemiplegia, such as denial of limb ownership (somatoparaphrenia) and with alterations in bodily self-consciousness on the level of the entire body (e.g. in autoscopic phenomena). In healthy participants, the mechanisms underpinning body ownership and observer perspective are empirically investigated by multisensory stimulation paradigms to alter the bodily self. The resulting illusions have promoted the understanding of complex disturbances of the bodily self, such as out-of-body experiences. We discuss the role of interoception in differentiating between self and others and review current advances in the study of body integrity identity disorder, a condition shaped as much by neurological as by social-psychological factors. SUMMARY: We advocate a social neuroscience approach to the bodily self that takes into account the interactions between body, mind and society and might help close the divide between neurology and psychiatry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/WCO.0000000000000151

  9 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25319400
[Au] Autor:Ogundunmade BG; Jasper US
[Ti] Title:Homozygous hemoglobin S (HbSS) presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy: a case report.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;7:729, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a relatively rare presentation and often points to a serious underlying medical condition. Several studies have reported presentation of bilateral facial nerve palsy in association with Lyme disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, human immunodeficiency virus, sarcoidosis, diabetes and Hanson disease. While unilateral facial nerve palsy is sometimes associated with hemiplegia in sickle cell patients, no case of bilateral facial nerve palsy have been reported in the literature. CASE PRESENTATION: A 29-year-old black African woman who is a known homozygous haemoglobin S (HbSS) presented with bilateral facial nerve palsy. She had the said condition 2months post delivery of her first child and reported for physiotherapy 3months post incidence. The pre-treatment House Brackmann Facial Grading Scale (HBFGS) Scores were 3 for right side and 4 for left side. This patient was not on any medication for the facial palsy. After 4 sessions of combination therapy consisting of faradism, facial exercises and massage there was remarkable improvement in the neurological status of the facial muscles. The post treatment House Brackmann Facial Grading Scale score was 2 bilaterally. CONCLUSION: Bilateral facial nerve palsy may be an initial presentation of sickle cell anemia patients in the absence of other overt clinical presentations. Therefore sickle cell anemia should be considered among others, in the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial nerve palsy. Furthermore, this case report has highlighted the important role of physiotherapy in the management of bilateral facial nerve palsy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1756-0500-7-729

  10 / 11772 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25360335
[Au] Autor:Miller CP; Buerba RA; Leslie MP
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
[Ti] Title:Preoperative factors and early complications associated with hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.
[So] Source:Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil;5(2):73-81, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2151-4585
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Displaced femoral neck fractures are common injuries in the elderly individuals. There is controversy about the best treatment with regard to total hip arthroplasty (THA) versus hemiarthroplasty. This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) database to evaluate the preoperative risk factors associated with the decision to perform THA over hemiarthroplasty. We also evaluate the risk factors associated with postoperative complications after each procedure. Patients older than 50 years undergoing hemiarthroplasty or THA after fracture in the NSQIP database from 2007 to 2010 were compared to each other in terms of preoperative medical conditions, postoperative complications, and length of stay. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for preoperative risk factors for undergoing a THA versus a hemiarthroplasty and for complications after each procedure. In all, 783 patients underwent hemiarthroplasty and 419 underwent THA for fracture. Hemiarthroplasty patients had longer hospital stays. On multivariate logistic regression, the only significant predictor for having a THA after fracture over hemiarthroplasty was being aged 50 to 64 years. The patient characteristics/comorbidities that favored having a hemiarthroplasty were age >80 years, hemiplegia, being underweight, having a dependent functional status, being on dialysis, and having an early surgery. High body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, gender, and other comorbidities were not predictors of having one procedure over another. Disseminated cancer and diabetes were predictive of complications after THA while being overweight, obese I, or a smoker were protective. High ASA class and do-not-resuscitate status were significant predictors of complications after a hemiarthroplasty. This study identified clinical factors influencing surgeons toward performing either THA or hemiarthroplasty for elderly patients after femoral neck fractures. Younger, healthier patients were more likely to receive THA. Patients particularly at higher risks of complications after hemiarthroplasty should be monitored closely.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141103
[Lr] Last revision date:141103
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141031
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/2151458514528951


page 1 of 1178 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information