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[PMID]: 24739246
[Au] Autor:Heinzen EL; Arzimanoglou A; Brashear A; Clapcote SJ; Gurrieri F; Goldstein DB; Jóhannesson SH; Mikati MA; Neville B; Nicole S; Ozelius LJ; Poulsen H; Schyns T; Sweadner KJ; van den Maagdenberg A; Vilsen B; ATP1A3 Working Group
[Ad] Address:Center for Human Genome Variation, Duke University, School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Medicine, Section of Medical Genetics, Duke University, School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. Electronic address: e.heinzen@duke.edu....
[Ti] Title:Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations.
[So] Source:Lancet Neurol;13(5):503-14, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4465
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in-vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics
Mutation/genetics
Nervous System Diseases/genetics
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Databases, Bibliographic/statistics & numerical data
Hemiplegia/genetics
Humans
Models, Molecular
Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis
Parkinson Disease/genetics
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 3.6.3.9 (ATP1A3 protein, human); EC 3.6.3.9 (Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase)
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Cu] Class update date: 141017
[Lr] Last revision date:141017
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140417
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24392811
[Au] Autor:Mahayana IT; Sari DC; Chen CY; Juan CH; Muggleton NG
[Ad] Address:1Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University , Jhongli , Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:The potential of transcranial magnetic stimulation for population-based application: a region-based illustrated brief overview.
[So] Source:Int J Neurosci;124(10):717-23, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1563-5279
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The awareness of the global trends in neuroscience study, especially in the cognitive neuroscience field, should be increased. One notable approach is the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) not only as a research tool but also as a choice for treatment and rehabilitation in neurological disorders, such as post-stroke hemiplegia, visuospatial neglect syndrome, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and psychiatric conditions such as major depression and schizophrenia. All of these occur in significant numbers in highly populated regions. This paper briefly discusses the basic protocols and potential benefits of using TMS with the aim of providing insight that is useful in the design of future public health strategies in highly populated regions with a large neurocognitive burden of disease where this technique is currently underemployed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3109/00207454.2013.872641

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[PMID]: 22738290
[Au] Autor:Flattau A; Blank AE
[Ad] Address:Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USADepartment of Surgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USADepartment of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Risk factors for 90-day and 180-day mortality in hospitalised patients with pressure ulcers.
[So] Source:Int Wound J;11(1):14-20, 2014 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1742-481X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An understanding of risk factors associated with mortality among pressure ulcer patients can inform prognostic counselling and treatment plans. This retrospective cohort study examined associations of comorbid illness, demographic characteristics and laboratory values with 90-day and 90- to 180-day mortality in adult hospitalised patients with pressure ulcers. Data were extracted from hospital databases at two academic urban hospitals. Covariates included mortality risk factors identified in other populations, including demographic and laboratory variables, DRG weight, 'systemic infection or fever' and comorbidity categories from the Charlson comorbidity index. In adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, diabetes, chronic renal failure, congestive heart failure and metastatic cancer were significantly associated with mortality in both time frames. There was no significant effect on mortality from dementia, hemiplegia/paraplegia, rheumatic disease, chronic pulmonary disease or peripheral vascular disease. Myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular disease, liver disease and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS were associated with mortality in the 90-day time frame only. 'Systemic infection or fever' was associated with mortality in the 90-day time frame but did not show a confounding effect on other variables, and the only significant interaction term was with metastatic cancer. Albumin was the only studied laboratory value that was strongly associated with mortality. Understanding the context of comorbid illness in pressure ulcer patients sets the groundwork for more robust studies of patient- and population-level outcomes, as well as study of heterogeneity within this group.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Inpatients
Pressure Ulcer/mortality
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Complications
Female
Heart Failure/complications
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms/complications
Neoplasms/pathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Serum Albumin/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Serum Albumin)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/j.1742-481X.2012.01032.x

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[PMID]: 24284453
[Au] Autor:Suh JH; Han SJ; Jeon SY; Kim HJ; Lee JE; Yoon TS; Chong HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea....
[Ti] Title:Effect of rhythmic auditory stimulation on gait and balance in hemiplegic stroke patients.
[So] Source:NeuroRehabilitation;34(1):193-9, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1878-6448
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) improves gait velocity, cadence, and stride length in hemiplegic stroke patients, yet little is known about the effectiveness of RAS on standing balance. OBJECTIVES: To examine and compare the effectiveness on standing balance and gait parameter of two different types of gait trainings, gait training with RAS versus gait training without RAS, was compared in two groups of hemiplegic stroke patients over a three-week period (RAS group, n = 8; control group = 8). METHODS: Sixteen hemiplegic stroke patients were included in the study. Standing balance was measured by using Biosway®. Stride length, gait velocity, and cadence were calculated from the number of steps and required time for a 10 m-walk. RESULTS: Pre- to post-test measures showed a significant improvement in RAS group for overall stability index (p = 0.043), mediolateral index (p = 0.006), anteroposterior index (p = 0.016), gait velocity (p = 0.012), stride length (p = 0.03) and cadence (p = 0.012) over the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed that RAS was an effective therapeutic method to improve gait velocity, stride length, cadence, and standing balance in hemiplegic stroke patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acoustic Stimulation
Gait
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Postural Balance
Stroke/rehabilitation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Female
Hemiplegia/etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3233/NRE-131008

  5 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 24142317
[Au] Autor:Lopes PA; Amancio OM; Araújo RF; Vitalle MS; Braga JA
[Ad] Address:Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Pediatria, São PauloSP, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Food pattern and nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy.
[So] Source:Rev Paul Pediatr;31(3):344-9, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1984-0462
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng; por
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES To assess the food intake pattern and the nutritional status of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 90 children from two to 12.8 years with cerebral palsy in the following forms: hemiplegia, diplegia, and tetraplegia. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, height, and age data. Food intake was verified by the 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. The ability to chew and/or swallowing, intestinal habits, and physical activity were also evaluated. RESULTS For 2-3 year-old age group, the mean energy intake followed the recommended range; in 4-6 year-old age group with hemiplegia and tetraplegia, energy intake was below the recommended limits. All children presented low intake of carbohydrates, adequate intake of proteins and high intake of lipids. The tetraplegia group had a higher prevalence of chewing (41%) and swallowing (12.8%) difficulties compared to 14.5 and 6.6% of children with hemiplegia, respectively. Most children of all groups had a daily intestinal habit. All children presented mild physical activity, while moderate activity was not practiced by any child of the tetraplegia group, which had a significantly lower height/age Z score than those with hemiplegia (-2.14 versus -1.05; p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS The children with cerebral palsy presented inadequate dietary pattern and impaired nutritional status, with special compromise of height. Tetraplegia imposes difficulties regarding chewing/swallowing and moderate physical activity practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebral Palsy
Feeding Behavior
Nutritional Status
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cerebral Palsy/metabolism
Cerebral Palsy/physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 141015
[Lr] Last revision date:141015
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131021
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25306125
[Au] Autor:Calabrò RS; Reitano S; Leo A; De Luca R; Melegari C; Bramanti P
[Ti] Title:Can robot-assisted movement training (Lokomat) improve functional recovery and psychological well-being in chronic stroke? Promising findings from a case study.
[So] Source:Funct Neurol;29(2):139-41, 2014 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1971-3274
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Lokomat is a robotic device that has been widely used for gait rehabilitation in several neurological disorders, with a positive effect also in the chronic phase. We describe the case of a 54-yearold female with post-stroke moderate-to-severe chronic hemiplegia, whose force, gait and balance significantly improved after intensive training with Lokomat Pro. We also noted a positive impact of Lokomat on mood and coping styles. This may be partly related to the task-oriented exercises with computerized visual feedback, which in turn can be considered an important tool for increasing patients' motor output, involvement and motivation during gait training. Augmented feedback during robot-assisted gait appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function, but also of improving psychological and cognitive status.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24508938
[Au] Autor:Knutson JS; Harley MY; Hisel TZ; Makowski NS; Chae J
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (JSK, JC); Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center, Cleveland, Ohio (JSK, NSM, JC); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, MetroHealth Rehabilitation Institute of Ohio, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (JSK, MYH, TZH, JC); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (NSM).
[Ti] Title:Contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation for recovery of elbow extension and hand opening after stroke: a pilot case series study.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Med Rehabil;93(6):528-39, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1537-7385
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to determine whether patients with moderate-to-severe upper limb hemiplegia could use contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation at the arm and hand (Arm+Hand CCFES) at home and to evaluate the feasibility of Arm+Hand CCFES to reduce arm and hand motor impairment. DESIGN: With Arm+Hand CCFES, the paretic elbow and hand extensors were stimulated with intensities proportional to the degree of elbow extension and hand opening, respectively, of the contralateral unimpaired side. For 12 wks, four participants with chronic (≥6 mos) upper limb hemiplegia received ∼7 hrs per week of self-administered home-based stimulation-mediated elbow extension and hand opening exercise plus ∼2.5 hrs per week of therapist-supervised laboratory-based stimulation-assisted functional task practice. Assessments of upper limb impairment were made at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 1 mo after treatment. RESULTS: All four participants were able to use the Arm+Hand CCFES system at home either independently or with very minimal assistance from a caregiver. All four participants had increases in the Fugl-Meyer score (1-9 points) and the Wolf Motor Function Test (0.2-0.8 points) and varying degrees of improvement in maximum hand opening, maximum elbow extension, and simultaneous elbow extension and hand opening. CONCLUSIONS: Arm+Hand CCFES can be successfully administered in stroke patients with moderate-to-severe impairment and can reduce various aspects of upper limb impairment. A larger efficacy study is warranted.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Elbow/physiopathology
Electric Stimulation Therapy
Hand/physiopathology
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Movement/physiology
Stroke/rehabilitation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Disability Evaluation
Elbow/innervation
Exercise Therapy
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hand/innervation
Hemiplegia/physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal/innervation
Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology
Pilot Projects
Self Care
Stroke/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140520
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/PHM.0000000000000066

  8 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24365154
[Au] Autor:Reynaud Q; Catella J; Diconne E; Lafond P; Tardy B
[Ad] Address:Service de médecine interne, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055 Saint-Etienne cedex 2, France. Electronic address: quitteriereynaud@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Pas de chirurgie sans échographie préalable en cas de thrombose veineuse superficielle clinique : à propos d'un cas d'embolie paradoxale grave. [No surgery without previous compression ultrasound in patients with a superficial venous thrombosis: a case of massive paradoxical embolism].
[So] Source:Ann Fr Anesth Reanim;33(1):41-3, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1769-6623
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Lower limbs superficial venous thrombosis (LLSVT) is usually considered as common and of a benign prognosis. LLSVT can, however, be responsible for major thromboembolic complications: lower limbs deep vein thrombosis (LLDVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). We report a case of a LLSVT complicated with a massive bilateral PE and an ischemic cerebral stroke, occurring immediately after a varicose vein surgery. Venous ultrasonography of the lower limbs must be systematically performed in case of LLSVT, in order to evaluate the presence of an associated LLDVT. A rigorous diagnostic and therapeutic approach is the only way to optimize the treatment of this disorder, and to avoid the occurrence of dramatic venous thromboembolic complications.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Ischemia/complications
Embolism, Paradoxical/etiology
Lower Extremity/ultrasonography
Pulmonary Embolism/complications
Stroke/complications
Venous Thrombosis/surgery
Venous Thrombosis/ultrasonography
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dyspnea/etiology
Hemiplegia/etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Syncope/etiology
Varicose Veins/surgery
Venous Thrombosis/complications
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140221
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23469983
[Au] Autor:Fotopoulou A
[Ad] Address:Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Time to get rid of the 'Modular' in neuropsychology: a unified theory of anosognosia as aberrant predictive coding.
[So] Source:J Neuropsychol;8(1):1-19, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1748-6653
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cognitive neuroscience, being more inclusive and ambitious in scope than cognitive neuropsychology, seems to have taken the place of the latter within the modern neurosciences. Nevertheless, recent advances in the neurosciences afford neuropsychology with epistemic possibilities that simply did not exist even 15 years ago. Human lesion studies still have an important role to play in shaping such possibilities, particularly when combined with other methods of enquiry. I first outline theoretical and methodological advances within the neurosciences that can inform and shape the rebirth of a dynamic, non-modular neuropsychology. I then use an influential computational theory of brain function, the free energy principle, to suggest an unified account of anosognosia for hemiplegia as a research example of the potential for transition from a modular, cognitive neuropsychology to a dynamic, computational and even restorative neuropsychology. These and many other adjectives that can flexibly, take the place of 'cognitive' next to 'neuropsychology' will hopefully designate the much needed rebirth and demarcation of a field, neuropsychology itself, that has somehow lost its place within the modern neurosciences and yet seems to have a unique and important role to play in the future understanding of the brain.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agnosia/diagnosis
Brain/pathology
Neuropsychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Agnosia/complications
Agnosia/epidemiology
Cognition Disorders/etiology
Hemiplegia/complications
Humans
Models, Neurological
Nonlinear Dynamics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jnp.12010

  10 / 11756 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23881159
[Au] Autor:Nakano W; Sakamoto R; Ohashi Y
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tsukuba International University, Ibaraki bDepartment of Rehabilitation, Shizuoka City Shimizu Hospital, Shizuoka cDepartment of Physical Therapy, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Japan.
[Ti] Title:How patients with stroke adjust their step length to step over obstacles.
[So] Source:Int J Rehabil Res;37(1):34-9, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5660
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Step adjustment under temporal constraint is compromised following stroke. However, how step adjustment occurs under no temporal constraint remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate how patients with stroke adjust their step length to step over obstacles under no temporal constraint. Twelve patients with stroke and 12 age-matched and sex-matched individuals without stroke participated in an experiment involving the task of stepping over obstacles. Each participant's steps were measured by a footprint method and classified as a long-step, short-step, or even-step strategy. The differences in step length adjustment between patients with and without stroke were analyzed. Stroke survivors adjusted their step length in different ways depending on whether they led with the affected or the unaffected limb. If patients with stroke stepped over the obstacle by leading with the affected limb, they chose the short-step strategy. This strategy is probably intended to enhance accuracy and maintain stability. In conclusion, patients with stroke utilize a different step adjustment strategy to individuals without stroke, even in the absence of temporal constraint.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gait Disorders, Neurologic/diagnosis
Gait Disorders, Neurologic/rehabilitation
Hemiplegia/diagnosis
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Mobility Limitation
Orientation
Psychomotor Performance
Spatial Behavior
Stroke/diagnosis
Stroke/rehabilitation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Avoidance Learning
Distance Perception
Female
Functional Laterality
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Postural Balance
Time Perception
Weight-Bearing
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MRR.0b013e3283646bca


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