Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hemiplegia [Words]
References found : 11871 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1188 go to page                         

  1 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25684853
[Au] Autor:Gunes A; Demirci S; Umul A
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Süleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Medicine, Isparta, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Vision Loss and RNFL Thinning after Internal Carotid Arter Occlusion and Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction.
[So] Source:Acta Inform Med;22(6):413-4, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0353-8109
[Cp] Country of publication:Bosnia and Herzegovina
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Ischaemic, traumatic or neoplasmic damage to the optic chiasm, optic tract or lateral geniculate nucleus affects the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons, detected as reduced retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness around the optic nerve head. We report a case of vision loss and reduced RNFL thickness after internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction. CASE REPORT: A 33-year-old woman with a 3-month history of vision loss in right eye and left hemiplegia. The best corrected visual acuity was 1.0 in left eye and there was no light perception in the right eye. Ocular motility, intra-ocular pressure, anterior segments were normal in the both eyes. Her fundus examinations were normal except optic atrophy in the right eye. Visual field test was not performed because of cooperation difficulties. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an infarction of the right MCA. Computed tomographic angiography showed right ICA occlusion. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated 6 clock hours of RNFL thinning in the right eye. Average RNFL thickness of the right and left eyes were 53µm, 96 µm respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that a relatively short period of ICA occlusion and MCA infarction can cause vision loss and thinning of the RNFL.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150218
[Lr] Last revision date:150218
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150216
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5455/aim.2014.22.413-414

  2 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24453159
[Au] Autor:Miteff CI; Smith RL; Bain NL; Subramanian G; Brown JE; Kamien B
[Ad] Address:John Hunter Children's Hospital, New Lambton Heights, New South Wales, Australia christina.miteff@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au....
[Ti] Title:16p13.11 microdeletion in a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: a case report.
[So] Source:J Child Neurol;30(1):83-6, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1708-8283
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We describe a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. The pathophysiology of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome remains uncertain and there are probably multiple potential contributing factors. Our patient had a chromosomal 16p13.11 microdeletion that confers susceptibility to various types of epilepsy. This is the first report detailing an association of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with a 16p13.11 deletion and identifies another potential causal factor for hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/0883073813516382

  3 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24471481
[Au] Autor:Grosmaitre C; Jambaqué I; Dorfmuller G; Rodrigo S; Ville D; Delalande O; Bulteau C
[Ad] Address:a Inserm U663 , Paris , France.
[Ti] Title:Exceptional verbal intelligence after hemispherotomy in a child with Rasmussen encephalitis.
[So] Source:Neurocase;21(2):144-7, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3656
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a longitudinal case study of a left-handed girl who underwent left hemispherotomy at 7 years for Rasmussen encephalitis (RE). Presurgical evaluation showed mild hemiparesis, no visual defect, and light neuropsychological impairment with short-term memory weakness. Language fMRI showed a right hemispheric dominance. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited right hemiplegia and hemianopsia but preserved intellectual capacities. She became seizure-free, and antiepileptic medication was discontinued. Long-term follow-up showed very high verbal intelligence at 11 years of age (VCI of 155) and improvement in working memory as well as language and reading abilities. Furthermore, a significant visuoverbal discrepancy became increasingly pronounced. Thus, early surgical treatment of epilepsy avoided the global cognitive deterioration usually associated with RE. Finally, such a high level of verbal functioning combined with low spatial reasoning with a single hemisphere provides additional information on the neurocognitive profile of children with RE after hemispherotomy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/13554794.2013.878724

  4 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24151113
[Au] Autor:Doss VT; Arthur AS; Watridge C; Elijovich L
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA....
[Ti] Title:Acute carotid stenting for treatment of stuttering transient ischemic attacks after recent carotid endarterectomy.
[So] Source:J Neurointerv Surg;6(6):e35, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1759-8486
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the established standard to treat occlusive extracranial atherosclerotic carotid disease. Complications of CEA must be recognized and dealt with efficiently due to the potentially catastrophic neurologic sequelae. A 67-year-old African American man was transferred from an outside hospital for an acute stroke. He had initially presented with a small right frontal subcortical infarct and had undergone a right CEA 2 days prior to transfer. He had a fluctuating examination with left-sided hemiplegia to slight hemiparesis and inconsistent neglect. Head CT demonstrated a watershed infarct of the right hemisphere. CT angiography demonstrated high grade stenosis at the distal aspect of the CEA anastomosis. He was promptly taken for angiography and underwent acute stenting of the right internal carotid artery. This case demonstrates that carotid artery stenting is a safe management strategy for the treatment of complications associated with failed distal anastomosis during CEA.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carotid Arteries
Endarterectomy, Carotid/adverse effects
Endovascular Procedures/methods
Ischemic Attack, Transient/surgery
Stents
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects
Graft Occlusion, Vascular/therapy
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient/etiology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140630
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/neurintsurg-2013-010766.rep

  5 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text

[PMID]: 24733325
[Au] Autor:Farrell B; Eisener-Parsche P; Dalton D
[Ad] Address:Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère St, Ottawa, ON K1N 5C8. bfarrell@bruyere.org.
[Ti] Title:Turning over the rocks: role of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines in cognitive decline and falls.
[So] Source:Can Fam Physician;60(4):345-50, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1715-5258
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Accidental Falls
Benzodiazepines/adverse effects
Cholinergic Antagonists/adverse effects
Cognition Disorders/chemically induced
Medication Reconciliation
Polypharmacy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Female
Hemiplegia/chemically induced
Humans
Muscle Strength/drug effects
Neuropsychological Tests
Patient Care Team
Postural Balance/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cholinergic Antagonists); 12794-10-4 (Benzodiazepines)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140415
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25690116
[Au] Autor:Bassolino M; Sandini G; Pozzo T
[Ad] Address:Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Activating the motor system through action observation: is this an efficient approach in adults and children?
[So] Source:Dev Med Child Neurol;57 Suppl 2:42-5, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8749
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Observing an action performed by another person to learn a new movement is a frequent experience in adult daily life, such as in sports. However, it is an especially common circumstance during the development of motor skills in childhood. Studies on healthy humans indicate that action observation induces a facilitation in the observer's motor system. This effect is supported by an action-perception matching mechanism available both in adults and in children. Because of the simplicity of action observation, it has been proposed to apply this method in clinical contexts. After a brief, non-exhaustive introduction of the essential features underlying action observation in healthy people, we review recent studies reporting beneficial effects of rehabilitative training based on a combination of action perception and execution. We focus on therapeutic interventions for patients with upper-limb motor disabilities such as adults after stroke or children with hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy. Further, we consider data from basic science demonstrating that the facilitation induced by visual perception of the action can be modulated by the combination of multimodal stimuli related to the movement (e.g. visual and acoustic action-related inputs). In line with this, we discuss possible new directions to improve basic knowledge and therapeutic applications of action observation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/dmcn.12686

  7 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25038130
[Au] Autor:Deng Y; Wang Y; Yang W; Yu Y; Xu J; Wang Y; Gao B
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China....
[Ti] Title:Risk factors and imaging characteristics of childhood stroke in china.
[So] Source:J Child Neurol;30(3):339-43, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1708-8283
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are scarce reports of childhood stroke from China. Our objective was to describe the clinical spectrum, risk factors, and imaging characteristics of childhood stroke in China. Using a hospital discharge database, children with stroke who were first admitted from 2002 to 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. We identified 478 first admissions with childhood stroke, including 229 cases of ischemic stroke and 249 hemorrhagic stroke. Boys accounted for more than 60% in all stroke types (62.2% for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage for 66.2%). The leading cause was moyamoya for ischemic stroke and arteriovenous malformations for intracerebral hemorrhage. Hemiplegia and headache were the most common presenting features. Internal carotid artery and middle cerebral artery were the most involved arteries according to imaging examination in the ischemic stroke. A total of 8 patients died of intracerebral hemorrhage. The prevalence of hemorrhagic stroke was more than that of ischemic stroke. As Western countries, arteriopathy was the most common cause of childhood stroke.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0883073814538667

  8 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25053224
[Au] Autor:Ono T; Tomita Y; Inose M; Ota T; Kimura A; Liu M; Ushiba J
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Multimodal Sensory Feedback Associated with Motor Attempts Alters BOLD Responses to Paralyzed Hand Movement in Chronic Stroke Patients.
[So] Source:Brain Topogr;28(2):340-51, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6792
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Electroencephalogram-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) have been used as a potential tool for training volitional regulation of corticomuscular drive in patients who have severe hemiplegia due to stroke. However, it is unclear whether ERD observed while attempting motor execution can be regarded as a neural marker that represents M1 excitability in survivors of severe stroke. Therefore we investigated the association between ERD and the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal during attempted movement of a paralyzed finger in stroke patients. Nine chronic stroke patients received BCI training for finger extension movement 1 h daily for a duration of 1 month. The sensorimotor rhythm was recorded from the sensorimotor area of the damaged hemisphere, and ongoing amplitude variations were monitored using a BCI system. Either a visual alert or the action of a motor-driven orthosis was triggered in response to ERD of the sensorimotor rhythm while patients attempted extension movements of the paralyzed fingers. Inter-subject covariance between ERD and the BOLD response in the sensorimotor areas was calculated. After BCI training, an increased ERD over the damaged hemisphere was confirmed in all participants while they attempted extension of the affected finger and this increase was associated with a BOLD response in primary sensorimotor area. Whole-brain MRI revealed that the primary sensorimotor area and supplementary motor area were activated in the damaged hemisphere after 1 month of BCI training. ERD reflects the BOLD responses of the primary motor areas in either hemisphere while patients who have severe chronic hemiplegia due to a stroke attempt an extension movement of the paralyzed fingers. One month of BCI can alter motor-related brain area activation. Combining BCI with other methods to facilitate such changes may help to implement BCI for motor rehabilitation after stroke.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10548-014-0382-6

  9 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25440346
[Au] Autor:Khan M; Kamal AK; Islam M; Azam I; Virk A; Nasir A; Rehman H; Arif A; Jan M; Akhtar A; Mawani M; Razzak JA; Pasha O
[Ad] Address:Stroke Service, Department of Medicine, The International Cerebrovascular Translational Clinical Research Training Program, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Aga Khan University....
[Ti] Title:Can trained field community workers identify stroke using a stroke symptom questionnaire as well as neurologists? Adaptation and validation of a community worker administered stroke symptom questionnaire in a peri-urban Pakistani community.
[So] Source:J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis;24(1):91-9, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a paucity of data from South Asia where stroke is highly prevalent. Validated tools administrable by community health workers (CHWs) are required to identify stroke in the community in a resource-strapped region such as this. METHODS: The study was conducted in a transitional slum in Karachi, Pakistan. Questionnaire to Verify Stroke-Free Status (QVSFS) was adapted and translated into Urdu. Two CHWs, trained by a neurologist, selected 322 community-dwelling subjects using purposive sampling. Each CHW collected data independently, which was validated by a vascular neurologist who directly examined each participant. To assess the effect of audit and feedback, data from the final 10% of the subjects were collected after a second training session for the CHWs. Sensitivity, specificity, and Cohen kappa were determined for the CHW-administered questionnaire against neurovascular assessment. RESULTS: Mean age of participants was 56.5 years with 71% of participants being women. The sensitivity and specificity of the questionnaire of detecting stroke was 77.1% (confidence interval [CI], 64.1-86.9) and 85.8% (CI, 83.5-87.5), respectively. The chance-corrected agreement using the Cohen kappa statistic was .51 (CI, .38-.60). Kappa ranged from .37 to .58 for each of the 7 stroke symptoms. Hemianesthesia (72.9%) and hemiplegia (64.6%) were the most sensitive symptoms. The performance and agreement improved from moderate to substantial after audit and feedback. CONCLUSIONS: We found a reasonable sensitivity and specificity and moderate agreement between CHW-administered QVSFS and assessment by a vascular neurologist.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Cu] Class update date: 141228
[Lr] Last revision date:141228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 11871 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25667883
[Au] Autor:Oono M; Uno H; Umesaki A; Nagatsuka K; Kinoshita M; Naritomi H
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, 5-7-1 Fujishiro-dai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565, Japan ; Department of Neurology, Utano National Hospital, National Hospital Organization, 8 Ondoyama-Cho, Narutaki, Ukyoku, Kyoto 616-8255, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Severe and prolonged ictal paresis in an elderly patient.
[So] Source:Epilepsy Behav Case Rep;2:105-7, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2213-3232
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an 84-year-old female who showed a rare manifestation of epilepsy, ictal paresis, a type of simple partial seizure presenting with focal motor dysfunction. While the patient exhibited severe left hemiplegia which lasted for a week, cranial diffusion-weighted MRI demonstrated slightly high intensity in the right posterior quadrant, and electroencephalography (EEG) showed continuous epileptiform discharges located mainly in the right parieto-occipital area, strongly suggesting that the patient was in an ictal state. (99m)Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime-single photon emission computed tomography (HMPAO-SPECT) showed markedly high blood perfusion in the right parieto-temporo-occipital areas. Considering the distribution of EEG epileptiform activities and HMPAO-SPECT hyperperfusion, it is most likely that the ictal paresis of our patient was associated with epileptic activities at the sensorimotor area which caused either direct or indirect activation of an inhibitory system. Careful clinical consideration of the possibility of ictal paresis is needed in elderly patients, especially in those with preexisting dementia, because paresis can be as severe as complete flaccid hemiplegia and can last as long as for a week.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150212
[Lr] Last revision date:150212
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150210
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.ebcr.2014.03.009


page 1 of 1188 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information