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[PMID]: 26261665
[Au] Autor:Hassan WA; Udaka N; Ueda A; Ando Y; Ito T
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences Kumamoto, Japan ; Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University Ismailia, Egypt....
[Ti] Title:Neoplastic lesions in CADASIL syndrome: report of an autopsied Japanese case.
[So] Source:Int J Clin Exp Pathol;8(6):7533-9, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1936-2625
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common heritable causes of stroke and dementia in adults. The gene involved in the pathogenesis of CADASIL is Notch3; in which mutations affect the number of cysteine residues in its extracellular domain, causing its accumulation in small arteries and arterioles of the affected individuals. Besides the usual neurological and vascular findings that have been well-documented in CADASIL patients, this paper additionally reports multiple neoplastic lesions that were observed in an autopsy case of CADASIL patient; that could be related to Notch3 mutation. The patient was a 62 years old male, presented with a past history of neurological manifestations, including gait disturbance and frequent convulsive attacks. He was diagnosed as CADASIL syndrome with Notch3 Arg133Cys mutation. He eventually developed hemiplegia and died of systemic convulsions. Autopsy examination revealed-besides the vascular and neurological lesions characteristic of CADASIL- multiple neoplastic lesions in the body; carcinoid tumorlet and diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuro-endocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the lungs, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), prostatic adenocarcinoma (ADC) and adenomatoid tumor of the epididymis. This report describes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions that were found in a case of CADASIL patient that could be related to Notch3 gene mutations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150814
[Lr] Last revision date:150814
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25142215
[Au] Autor:Moro V; Scandola M; Bulgarelli C; Avesani R; Fotopoulou A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Philosophy, Education and Psychology , University of Verona , Verona , Italy.
[Ti] Title:Error-based training and emergent awareness in anosognosia for hemiplegia.
[So] Source:Neuropsychol Rehabil;25(4):593-616, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1464-0694
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Residual forms of awareness have recently been demonstrated in subjects affected by anosognosia for hemiplegia, but their potential effects in recovery of awareness remain to date unexplored. Emergent awareness refers to a specific facet of motor unawareness in which anosognosic subjects recognise their motor deficits only when they have been requested to perform an action and they realise their errors. Four participants in the chronic phase after a stroke with anosognosia for hemiplegia were recruited. They took part in an "error-full" or "analysis of error-based" rehabilitative training programme. They were asked to attempt to execute specific actions, analyse their own strategies and errors and discuss the reasons for their failures. Pre- and post-training and follow-up assessments showed that motor unawareness improved in all four patients. These results indicate that unsuccessful action attempts with concomitant error analysis may facilitate the recovery of emergent awareness and, sometimes, of more general aspects of awareness.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/09602011.2014.951659

  3 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25934588
[Au] Autor:Kalss G; Höfler J; Rohracher A; Deak I; Dobesberger J; Kuchukhidze G; Leitinger M; Ogris K; Mc Coy M; Trinka E
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Medical Centre, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Ignaz Harrer Strasse 79, 5020 Salzburg, Austria; Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Ignaz Harrer Strasse 79, 5020 Salzburg, Austria. Electronic address: g.kalss@salk.at....
[Ti] Title:The demise of Archbishop Wolf Dietrich - A historical note on a fatal status epilepticus documented at Salzburg in 1617.
[So] Source:Epilepsy Behav;49:4-7, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1525-5069
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Wolf Dietrich of Raitenau (WD) ruled the archiepiscopal Salzburg from March 2nd 1587 to December 17th 1611. He was condemned by his successor Archbishop Markus Sittikus of Hohenems to spend his last years imprisoned at the Fortress Hohensalzburg, where he died on January 16th 1617. This historical note describes the causes of his death. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The original Latin handwriting, including the detailed medical history and the autopsy of the Archbishop's body performed by his personal physician, was analyzed in conjunction with historical handwritings provided by St. Peter's Abbey, Salzburg handwriting assigned to Markus Sittikus. RESULTS: Wolf Dietrich of Raitenau had his first well-documented left hemispheric stroke in winter 1604/05. He had palsy of his right arm, was unable to write, and, therefore, used a stamp instead of his signature until October 1605. After another stroke, right hemispheric in origin with persisting palsy of his left arm ["leva corporis pars iam pridem simili ex apoplectico assultu in paralysin resoluta"], he developed symptomatic epilepsy with recurring seizures ["epileptico insultu quo etiam alias correptus est"]. On January 15th 1617, he suffered from a secondarily generalized convulsive status epilepticus ["toto corpore convellitur epileptico insultu"] with stertorous breathing and distortion of his face ["spuma stertore insigni faciei perversione"] and was unconscious for 8h. He recovered from coma and showed dysphagia, buccofacial apraxia ["abolitam diglutiendi facultatem"], reversible speech disturbance ["accisa etiam verba loqui"], and left-sided hemiplegia ["leva corporis pars… immobilis prorsus est reddita"]. The following day, he had speech disturbances, and he died at noon. His autopsy showed large but intact liver ["hepar magnum sanum"] and heart ["cor magnum in quo lapsus nullus"]. There was intrapulmonal mucus ["pituita imbutus"], and part of the lungs adhered to its pleura. He had five kidney stones and a partly cirrhotic spleen. The cause of his death was assumed to be intracerebral ["causa mortis in capite requienda fuisset"]. DISCUSSION: The terminal suffering of Wolf Dietrich of Raitenau is the first witnessed case report on a fatal status epilepticus in Salzburg. Most likely, he suffered from vascular epilepsy due to a right hemispheric stroke, leading to status epilepticus with left-sided Todd's palsy and speech disturbances. An acute symptomatic etiology of this disease cannot be ruled out, as for religious reasons, the Archbishop's brain was not autopsied. CONCLUSION: Meticulous medical reporting including autopsy was already available in Salzburg in 1617, and the symptomatic etiology of epilepsy was diagnosed correctly. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26186256
[Au] Autor:Kong AP; Law SP; Wat WK; Lai C
[Ad] Address:Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, HPA-2 106, PO Box 162215, Orlando, FL 32816-2215, USA. Electronic address: antkong@ucf.edu....
[Ti] Title:Co-verbal gestures among speakers with aphasia: Influence of aphasia severity, linguistic and semantic skills, and hemiplegia on gesture employment in oral discourse.
[So] Source:J Commun Disord;56:88-102, 2015 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7994
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The use of co-verbal gestures is common in human communication and has been reported to assist word retrieval and to facilitate verbal interactions. This study systematically investigated the impact of aphasia severity, integrity of semantic processing, and hemiplegia on the use of co-verbal gestures, with reference to gesture forms and functions, by 131 normal speakers, 48 individuals with aphasia and their controls. All participants were native Cantonese speakers. It was found that the severity of aphasia and verbal-semantic impairment was associated with significantly more co-verbal gestures. However, there was no relationship between right-sided hemiplegia and gesture employment. Moreover, significantly more gestures were employed by the speakers with aphasia, but about 10% of them did not gesture. Among those who used gestures, content-carrying gestures, including iconic, metaphoric, deictic gestures, and emblems, served the function of enhancing language content and providing information additional to the language content. As for the non-content carrying gestures, beats were used primarily for reinforcing speech prosody or guiding speech flow, while non-identifiable gestures were associated with assisting lexical retrieval or with no specific functions. The above findings would enhance our understanding of the use of various forms of co-verbal gestures in aphasic discourse production and their functions. Speech-language pathologists may also refer to the current annotation system and the results to guide clinical evaluation and remediation of gestures in aphasia. LEARNING OUTCOMES: None.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150811
[Lr] Last revision date:150811
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25467429
[Au] Autor:Krzak JJ; Corcos DM; Damiano DL; Graf A; Hedeker D; Smith PA; Harris GF
[Ad] Address:Midwestern University, Physical Therapy Program, College of Health Sciences, 555 31st Street, Downers Grove, IL, United States; Shriners Hospitals for Children®-Chicago, 2211 North Oak Park Avenue, Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: joekrzak@sbcglobal.net....
[Ti] Title:Kinematic foot types in youth with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegia.
[So] Source:Gait Posture;41(2):402-8, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2219
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Elevated kinematic variability of the foot and ankle segments exists during gait among individuals with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Clinicians have previously addressed such variability by developing classification schemes to identify subgroups of individuals based on their kinematics. OBJECTIVE: To identify kinematic subgroups among youth with equinovarus secondary to CP using 3-dimensional multi-segment foot and ankle kinematics during locomotion as inputs for principal component analysis (PCA), and K-means cluster analysis. METHODS: In a single assessment session, multi-segment foot and ankle kinematics using the Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM) were collected in 24 children/adolescents with equinovarus and 20 typically developing children/adolescents. RESULTS: PCA was used as a data reduction technique on 40 variables. K-means cluster analysis was performed on the first six principal components (PCs) which accounted for 92% of the variance of the dataset. The PCs described the location and plane of involvement in the foot and ankle. Five distinct kinematic subgroups were identified using K-means clustering. Participants with equinovarus presented with variable involvement ranging from primary hindfoot or forefoot deviations to deformtiy that included both segments in multiple planes. CONCLUSION: This study provides further evidence of the variability in foot characteristics associated with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegic CP. These findings would not have been detected using a single segment foot model. The identification of multiple kinematic subgroups with unique foot and ankle characteristics has the potential to improve treatment since similar patients within a subgroup are likely to benefit from the same intervention(s).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23139004
[Au] Autor:Bayir A; Aydogdu Kiresi D; Söylemez A; Demirci O
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. aysegulbayir@hotmail.com
[Ti] Title:Cerebral infarction caused by traumatic carotid artery dissection.
[So] Source:Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg;18(4):347-50, 2012 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1306-696X
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traumatic carotid artery dissection, if not diagnosed and treated early, is a serious problem with permanent neurological deficit and a high mortality rate of up to 40%. We present a case with delayed diagnosis of traumatic carotid artery dissection in a 21-year-old female. While there were no ischemic infarct findings on the admission cerebral computerized tomography (CT), such findings were observed on two cerebral CTs taken because of the left hemiplegia noticed seven days later when the patient regained consciousness. The patient was referred to our emergency service, and definitive diagnosis was achieved with arterial Doppler ultrasonography, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion MRI, and MR angiography. We did not consider invasive treatment since the neurological damage was permanent and dissection grade was IV according to angiography findings. The case was discharged within a week and physiotherapy was advised. Despite the advances in diagnostic methods, diagnosis of traumatic carotid artery dissection is still missed or delayed, as in the case presented here. Early diagnosis can ameliorate permanent neurological damage or even prevent it. However, the vital factors for early diagnosis are the obtained anamnesis leading to appropriate radiological examinations, detailed physical examination and high clinical suspicion.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection/complications
Cerebral Infarction/etiology
Wounds, Nonpenetrating/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Accidents, Traffic
Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection/diagnosis
Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection/etiology
Cerebral Infarction/complications
Cerebral Infarction/radiography
Delayed Diagnosis
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Motorcycles
Paresis/etiology
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:121109
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5505/tjtes.2012.66900

  7 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26262069
[Au] Autor:Cargnin DJ; Cordeiro d'Ornellas M; Cervi Prado AL
[Ad] Address:Laboratório de Computação Aplicada, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria-RS, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:A Serious Game for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation Using Biofeedback and Mirror-Neurons Based Training.
[So] Source:Stud Health Technol Inform;216:348-52, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0926-9630
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Upper limb stroke rehabilitation requires early, intensive and repetitive practice to be effective. Consequently, it is often difficult to keep patients committed to their rehabilitation regimen. In addition to direct measures of rehabilitation achievable through targeted assessments, other factors can indirectly lead to rehabilitation. Current levels of integration between commodity graphics software, hardware, and body-tracking devices have provided a reliable tool to build what are referred to as serious games, focusing on the rehabilitation paradigm. More specifically, serious games can captivate and engage players for a specific purpose such as developing new knowledge or skills. This paper discusses a serious game application with a focus on upper limb rehabilitation in patients with hemiplegia or hemiparesis. The game makes use of biofeedback and mirror-neurons to enhance the patient's engagement. Results from the application of a quantitative self-report instrument to assess in-game engagement suggest that the serious game is a viable instructional approach rather than an entertaining novelty and, furthermore, demonstrates the future potential for dual action therapy-focused games.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:T
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26258451
[Au] Autor:Kim CY; Lee JS; Kim HD; Kim IS
[Ti] Title:Effects of the combination of respiratory muscle training and abdominal drawing-in maneuver on respiratory muscle activity in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia: a pilot randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Top Stroke Rehabil;22(4):262-70, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1074-9357
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: No study has examined the effects of the combination of respiratory muscle training (RMT) and abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) on respiratory muscle activity and function in stroke patients during early pulmonary rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RMT combined with ADIM on decreased respiratory muscle activity and function in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia. METHODS: Thirty-seven subjects with post-stroke hemiplegia were randomly allocated to three groups; integrated training group (ITG), respiratory muscle training group (RMTG), and control group (CG). All of the subjects received routine therapy for stroke rehabilitation for 1 hour, five times a week for 6 weeks. Especially, the ITG received RMT using an incentive respiratory spirometer and ADIM using a Stabilizer, and the RMTG only received RMT using incentive respiratory spirometer for 15 minutes a day, five times a week for 6 weeks. Pulmonary function was evaluated using spirometry for measuring the forced vital capacity (FVC) and force expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Additional surface electromyography (sEMG) analysis was included by measuring the respiratory muscle activity. RESULTS: Our results showed that changes between the pre- and post-test values of FVC (F = 12.50, P = 0.02) and FEV1 (F = 12.81, P = 0.01) (P < 0.05) in the ITG were significantly (P < 0.05) greater. Changes in EMG activation of the diaphragm (F = 13.75, P = 0.003) and external intercostal (F = 14.33, P = 0.002) (P < 0.01) muscles of patients in the ITG during maximal static inspiratory efforts were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those in patients of the RMTG and the CG at post-test. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggested that RMT combined with ADIM could improve pulmonary function in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1179/1074935714Z.0000000020

  9 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25687763
[Au] Autor:Kwakkel G; van Wegen EE; Meskers CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Neurorehabilitation, Reade Center of Rehabilitation and Rheumatology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.kwakkel@vumc.nl.
[Ti] Title:Invited commentary on comparison of robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and motor learning methods for treatment of persistent upper extremity dysfunction after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Arch Phys Med Rehabil;96(6):991-3, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1532-821X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Jessica McCabe and colleagues report findings from their methodologically sound, dose-matched clinical trial in 39 patients beyond 6 months poststroke. In this phase II trial, the effects of 60 treatment sessions, each involving 3.5 hours of intensive practice plus either 1.5 hours of functional electrical stimulation (FES) or a shoulder-arm robotic therapy, were compared with 5 hours of intensive daily practice alone. Although no significant between-group differences were found on the primary outcome measure of Arm Motor Ability Test and the secondary outcome measure of Fugl-Meyer Arm motor score, 10% to 15% within-group therapeutic gains were on the Arm Motor Ability Test and Fugl-Meyer Arm. These gains are clinically meaningful for patients with stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms that drive these improvements remain poorly understood. The approximately $1000 cost reduction per patient calculated for the use of motor learning (ML) methods alone or combined with FES, compared with the combination of ML and shoulder-arm robotics, further emphasizes the need for cost considerations when making clinical decisions about selecting the most appropriate therapy for the upper paretic limb in patients with chronic stroke.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Electric Stimulation Therapy
Hemiplegia/rehabilitation
Physical Therapy Modalities
Robotics
Stroke/rehabilitation
Upper Extremity/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150605
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 12042 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25307939
[Au] Autor:Aguilar C; Beltran B; Quiñones P; Carbajal T; Vilcapaza J; Yabar A; Segura P; Quintanilla-Martinez L; Miranda RN; Castillo JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Edgardo Rebagliati Hospital, Lima, Peru. Electronic address: dr.cris85@yahoo.com....
[Ti] Title:Large B-cell lymphoma arising in cardiac myxoma or intracardiac fibrinous mass: a localized lymphoma usually associated with Epstein-Barr virus?
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Pathol;24(1):60-4, 2015 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1336
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Primary cardiac neoplasms are rare. However, among them, cardiac myxoma is the most common tumor. In contrast, primary cardiac lymphoma within a cardiac myxoma is extremely rare and might be difficult to diagnose because of non-specific clinical manifestations. We report the case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with acute onset of transient dysarthria and left hemiplegia. A transthoracic echocardiography showed a 6×2.5-cm solid mass in the left atrium, which was subsequently resected. Histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses revealed an EBV-associated CD30-positive large B-cell lymphoma with anaplastic morphology within a cardiac myxoma and fibrinous material. Staging studies showed no evidence of lymphoma elsewhere. The patient achieved complete remission and is alive 42 months after diagnosis, and did not receive chemotherapy. We discuss the clinical and pathologic features of lymphoma arising in cardiac myxoma or in intra-atrial fibrinoid mass and the potential role of IL-6 in its pathogenesis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Heart Neoplasms/pathology
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/pathology
Myxoma/pathology
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141216
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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