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[PMID]: 24582515
[Au] Autor:Zissimopoulos A; Stine R; Fatone S; Gard S
[Ad] Address:Northwestern University Prosthetics-Orthotics Center, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Evanston, IL, USA. Electronic address: kikiz@u.northwestern.edu....
[Ti] Title:Mediolateral foot placement ability during ambulation in individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiplegia.
[So] Source:Gait Posture;39(4):1097-102, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2219
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mediolateral (ML) foot placement is an effective way to redirect the lateral trajectory of the body center of mass (BCoM) during ambulation, but has only been partly characterized in the chronic post-stroke population despite their increased risk for falling [1]. During able-bodied gait, the locomotor system coordinates lower limb swing phase kinematics such that an appropriate ML foot placement occurs upon foot contact. Muscle weakness and abnormal motor patterns may impair foot placement ability post-stroke. The purpose of this study was to characterize ML foot placement ability during post-stroke ambulation by quantifying ML foot placement accuracy and precision, for the both sound and affected feet. Age matched able-bodied individuals were recruited for comparison. All participants were instructed to target step widths ranging from 0 to 45% leg length, as marked on the laboratory floor. Results of this study confirmed that ML foot placement accuracy and precision were significantly lower for the post-stroke group as compared to the control group (p=0.0). However, ML foot placement accuracy and precision were not significantly different between the affected and sound limbs in the post-stroke group. The lowest accuracy for post-stroke subjects was observed at both extreme step width targets (0 and 45%). Future work should explore potential mechanisms underlying these findings such as abnormal motor coordination, lower limb muscle strength, and abnormal swing phase movement patterns.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24678502
[Au] Autor:Lee JW; Han AR; Kim K
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Medicine, Jungwon University, Goesan, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Effects of rehabilitative horse riding on the Sit-to-Stand action of the adolescent with brain lesions.
[So] Source:J Exerc Rehabil;10(1):31-4, 2014 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2288-176X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The purpose of this study was to investigate the balance abilities of the adolescent girl with brain lesions by Sit-to-Stand (STS) action analysis before and after the rehabilitative horse riding of 16 week program. The subject aged 16 yr old who had the disabilities of spasticity and hemiplegia was recruited with the consent approval. The equilibrium abilities of the subject were tested by Sit-to-Stand examination with Weight Transfer Time (WTT), Mean Rising Index (MRI), Mean Weight Asymmetry (MWA), Max Trunk Flexion Velocity (MTFV), and Max Trunk Extension Velocity (MTEV). Research was designed by AB single subject study with baseline of 3 times of measurement and rehabilitative horse riding treatments. In the results, the enhancement of the subject's equilibrium ability was shown from the comparisons between baseline and treatment by the STS test that WTT was 2.37 sec faster, MRI was 6.64 N/kg higher, and MWA was 8.12% lower, and MTFV was 0.57°/sec larger than all those means of baseline. It suggested that the subject showed her enhanced balance ability while in sitting and standing after the rehabilitative horse riding treatments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Cu] Class update date: 140331
[Lr] Last revision date:140331
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140328
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.12965/jer.140091

  3 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24671373
[Au] Autor:Yanamandra U; Gupta A; Patyal S; Varma PP
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, 153 General Hospital, Leh, Jammu & Kashmir, India.
[Ti] Title:High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2014, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24614781
[Au] Autor:Bhat RY; Kakkar S; Prakashini K
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Karnataka, India.
[Ti] Title:Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: clinical course and neuroradiological features in a 20-month-old girl.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2014, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome involves initial sudden and prolonged unilateral convulsive seizures, followed by transient or permanent hemiplegia and epilepsy during infancy or early childhood. Seizures are prolonged, difficult to control and sometimes may require surgery. Hemiplegia varies in intensity, differs from Todd paralysis and disappears in about 20% of cases. Neuroimaging characteristically shows brain atrophy more pronounced on the hemisphere contralateral to the side of hemiplegia with dilation of the ventricular system. A 20-month-old girl presented with left hemiconvulsions and left hemiplegia lasting for a prolonged period. Seizures failed to resolve with various anticonvulsants even after many physician contacts. Characteristic neuroimaging findings, seizure control with carbamazepine and valproate, subsequent recovery of hemiplegia and attainment of developmental milestones observed on follow-up confirmed HHE syndrome. The case highlights the need for good seizure control in this syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24605730
[Au] Autor:Bangash AS; Hanafi MZ; Idrees R; Zehra N
[Ad] Address:Ziauddin Medical University, North Nazimabad, Karachi, Pakistan. areeb.sohail@hotmail.com...
[Ti] Title:Risk factors and types of cerebral palsy.
[So] Source:J Pak Med Assoc;64(1):103-7, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0030-9982
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk factors and associated types of cerebral palsy in a squatter settlement of Karachi. METHODS: The pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in Karachi during 2010 and 2011. Data was collected through an interviewed questionnaire from the mothers of cerebral palsy victims children from a population of 6000. Sample sizes of 20 pre-diagnosed victims were selected through snowball sampling. SPSS 20 was used for statistical significance. RESULTS: The mean age of the 20 children was 8.7 +/- 6.4 years. Of them, 16 (80%) were males and 4 (20%) were females. Major risk factors identified were; home and assisted delivery 5 (75%), consanguinity 10 (50%), infections 8 (40%) and lack of antenatal care 6 (30%). Out of 20 cases, 15 (75%) had spastic type of cerebral palsy, which was further classified as diplegia 7 (35%), quadriplegia 6 (30%) and hemiplegia 2 (10%). Mixed and dystonic types were found in 3 (15%) and 2 (10%) children respectively. CONCLUSION: Important risk factors identified were home delivery, consanguinity and infections during pregnancy. Spastic type of cerebral palsy was the most common type in the study population.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebral Palsy/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Consanguinity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Pakistan/epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology
Risk Factors
Transients and Migrants
Urban Population
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140310
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24431297
[Au] Autor:Brashear A; Ozelius LJ; Sweadner KJ
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neurology (A.B.), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston-Salem, NC; the Department of Genetics & Genomic Sciences (L.J.O.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; and Neurosurgery (K.J.S.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
[Ti] Title:ATP1A3 mutations: what is the phenotype?
[So] Source:Neurology;82(6):468-9, 2014 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1526-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hemiplegia/genetics
Motor Skills Disorders/genetics
Respiratory Paralysis/genetics
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics
Status Epilepticus/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; EDITORIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 3.6.3.9 (ATP1A3 protein, human); EC 3.6.3.9 (Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase)
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000113

  7 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24431296
[Au] Autor:Sasaki M; Ishii A; Saito Y; Morisada N; Iijima K; Takada S; Araki A; Tanabe Y; Arai H; Yamashita S; Ohashi T; Oda Y; Ichiseki H; Hirabayashi S; Yasuhara A; Kawawaki H; Kimura S; Shimono M; Narumiya S; Suzuki M; Yoshida T; Oyazato Y; Tsuneishi S; Ozasa S; Yokochi K; Dejima S; Akiyama T; Kishi N; Kira R; Ikeda T; Oguni H; Zhang B; Tsuji S; Hirose S
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Child Neurology (M. Sasaki, Y.S.), National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira; Department of Pediatrics and Central Research Institute for the Molecular Pathomechanisms of Epilepsy (A.I., S. Hirose) and Department of Biochemistry (B.Z.), Fukuoka University School of Medicine; Department of Pediatrics (N.M., K.I., S. Takada), Kobe University School of Medicine; Department of Pediatrics (A.A., Y.T.), Kansai Medical University, Osaka; Department of Neurology (H.A.), Chiba Children's Hospital; Division of Neurology (S.Y.), Kanagawa Children's Medical Center, Yokohama; Department of Pediatrics (T.O.), Nishi-Niigata Central Hospital, Niigata; Department of Pediatrics (Y. Oda, H.I.), Chigasaki Municipal Hospital; Department of Neurology (S. Hirabayashi), Nagano Children's Hospital, Azumino; Yasuhara Children's Clinic (A.Y.), Osaka; Department of Pediatrics (H.K.), Osaka City General Hospital; Division of Child Neurology (S.K.), Osaka Medical Center and Research Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Izumi; Department of Pediatrics (M. Shimono), University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu; Department of Pediatrics (S.N.), Nagahama Red Cross Hospital; Department of Child Neurology (M. Suzuki), Aichi Prefectural Colony Central Hospital, Kasugai; Department of Pediatrics (T.Y.), Kyoto University School of Medicine; Department of Pediatrics (Y. Oyazato), Kakogawa-Nishi Municipal Hospital, Kakogawa; Department of Pediatrics (S. Tsuneishi), Medical and Welfare Center Kizuna, Kasai; Department of Child Development (S.O.), Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University Graduate School, Kumamoto; Department of Pediatric Neurology (K.Y.), Seirei-Mikatahara Hospital, Hamamatsu; Department of Pediatrics (S.D.), Kyoto Min-iren Chuo Hospital, Kyoto; Department of Child Neurology (T.A.), Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine; Department of Psychiatry (N.K.), Kyoto Katsura Hospital, Kyoto; Department of Pediatrics, (R.K.) Fukuo
[Ti] Title:Genotype-phenotype correlations in alternating hemiplegia of childhood.
[So] Source:Neurology;82(6):482-90, 2014 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1526-632X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Clinical severity of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is extremely variable. To investigate genotype-phenotype correlations in AHC, we analyzed the clinical information and ATP1A3 mutations in patients with AHC. METHODS: Thirty-five Japanese patients who were clinically diagnosed with AHC participated in this study. ATP1A3 mutations were analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Detailed clinical information was collected from family members of patients with AHC and clinicians responsible for their care. RESULTS: Gene analysis revealed 33 patients with de novo heterozygous missense mutations of ATP1A3: Glu815Lys in 12 cases (36%), Asp801Asn in 10 cases (30%), and other missense mutations in 11 cases. Clinical information was compared among the Glu815Lys, Asp801Asn, and other mutation groups. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in the history of neonatal onset, gross motor level, status epilepticus, and respiratory paralysis in the Glu815Lys group compared with the other groups. In addition, 8 patients who did not receive flunarizine had severe motor deteriorations. CONCLUSIONS: The Glu815Lys genotype appears to be associated with the most severe AHC phenotype. Although AHC is not generally seen as a progressive disorder, it should be considered a disorder that deteriorates abruptly or in a stepwise fashion, particularly in patients with the Glu815Lys mutation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hemiplegia/genetics
Motor Skills Disorders/genetics
Respiratory Paralysis/genetics
Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics
Status Epilepticus/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Hemiplegia/complications
Hemiplegia/physiopathology
Heterozygote
Humans
Infant
Male
Motor Skills Disorders/etiology
Motor Skills Disorders/physiopathology
Mutation, Missense/genetics
Respiratory Paralysis/etiology
Respiratory Paralysis/physiopathology
Severity of Illness Index
Status Epilepticus/etiology
Status Epilepticus/physiopathology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 3.6.3.9 (ATP1A3 protein, human); EC 3.6.3.9 (Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase)
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140211
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000102

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[PMID]: 23622215
[Au] Autor:Dulac O; Takahashi T
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Neurology, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, UMR663, Paris, France. Electronic address: olivier.dulac@nck.aphp.fr.
[Ti] Title:Status epilepticus.
[So] Source:Handb Clin Neurol;111:681-9, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:0072-9752
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Status epilepticus (SE) is a state of continuous epileptic activity, the duration of which varies from minutes to hours according to etiology. It may exhibit the various clinical expressions of epileptic seizures: convulsive clonic, tonic, or tonic-clonic, nonconvulsive including focal or absence, the latter being typical or atypical; it may be focal, unilateral, or bilateral. Mixed seizure types may affect epileptic encephalopathies (i.e., Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). SE may consist of a single seizure or repeat seizures without recovery of consciousness. It may be symptomatic of some acute brain damage or complicated epilepsy, either at onset or in the course, usually symptomatic although occasionally idiopathic (i.e., occipital epilepsy). A clue to diagnosis is drawn from clinical characteristics including history but nonconvulsive SE requires EEG recording. Specific conditions need to be identified, namely those occurring after acute nonspecific infection: "hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy" (HHE) syndrome and "fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school age children" (FIRES) begin with status epilepticus. Appropriate treatment requires identification of the cause, including some epilepsy syndrome. This permits etiological in addition to symptomatic treatment. Brain energy supply is a crucial component: drugs that may alter cerebral blood flow (e.g., barbiturates) should be restricted to specific conditions. Nonchemical treatment, including the ketogenic diet, may play an increasing role.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain/pathology
Status Epilepticus
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Status Epilepticus/epidemiology
Status Epilepticus/pathology
Status Epilepticus/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24590225
[Au] Autor:Mukaino M; Ono T; Shindo K; Fujiwara T; Ota T; Kimura A; Liu M; Ushiba J
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, 078-8510 Asahikawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of brain-computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation for chronic paresis after stroke.
[So] Source:J Rehabil Med;46(4):378-82, 2014 Mar 31.
[Is] ISSN:1651-2081
[Cp] Country of publication:Sweden
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Brain computer interface technology is of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic measure for people with severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of brain computer interface, by comparing conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and brain computer interface-driven neuromuscular electrical stimulation, using an A-B-A-B withdrawal single-subject design. Methods: A 38-year-old male with severe hemiplegia due to a putaminal haemorrhage participated in this study. The design involved 2 epochs. In epoch A, the patient attempted to open his fingers during the application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, irrespective of his actual brain activity. In epoch B, neuromuscular electrical stimulation was applied only when a significant motor-related cortical potential was observed in the electroencephalogram. Results: The subject initially showed diffuse functional magnetic resonance imaging activation and small electro-encephalogram responses while attempting finger movement. Epoch A was associated with few neurological or clinical signs of improvement. Epoch B, with a brain computer interface, was associated with marked lateralization of electroencephalogram (EEG) and blood oxygenation level dependent responses. Voluntary electromyogram (EMG) activity, with significant EEG-EMG coherence, was also prompted. Clinical improvement in upper-extremity function and muscle tone was observed. Conclusion: These results indicate that self-directed training with a brain computer interface may induce activity- dependent cortical plasticity and promote functional recovery. This preliminary clinical investigation encourages further research using a controlled design.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2340/16501977-1785

  10 / 11561 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23989474
[Au] Autor:Kose D; Paksoy Y; Koksal Y; Unal E
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey, drdogankose@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Neurological complication of non Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood: experience from a single center in Turkey.
[So] Source:Childs Nerv Syst;30(4):639-45, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0350
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Lymphomas are the third most common childhood malignant disease after leukemia and central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Early diagnosis of these complications will reduce mortality and morbidity. In this study we aimed to review the neurological complications of childhood non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty four children with NHL between 2006 and 2012 were investigated retrospectively and 14 cases with neurological complications were identified. RESULTS: The most common symptom was alteration of the consciousness (10 patients, 71.4 %) followed by convulsion (5 patients, 35.7 %), and hallucination (4 patients, 28.5 %); headache, eye pain, neurogenic bladder, speech disability and facial paralysis, and hemiplegia, were less common and each of them was seen in 1 (7.1 %) of the patients. The neurological complications were mostly seen in children with precursor T lymphoblastic lymphoma followed by anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The complications were secondary to medications (Eight patients) infection (two patients); CNS relapse (two patients); or CNS involvement of the primary disease (two patients). Chemotherapy-related neurologic complications were secondary to intrathecal methotrexate, L-asparaginase, vincristine, and ifosfamide CONCLUSION: Advanced disease and PTLL subtype can be suggested as predictors of neurological complication. The survival rates of neurological complications are fairly good unless it is secondary to involvement of the primary disease. In patients with drug-induced neurological complications, the treatment can be safely re-administered after controlling the neurological complications. Therefore, clinicians managing children with NHL must be informative about neurological complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00381-013-2267-5


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