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[PMID]: 29524722
[Au] Autor:Wang Q; Wu X; Tan M; Wang G; Xu S; Qi Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Spine Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000, China.
[Ti] Title:Is anatomical reduction better than partial reduction in patients with vertical atlantoaxial dislocation?
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To describe lower cranial nerve palsy (LCNP) following vertical over-distraction when performing occipitocervical fusion (OCF) to treat vertical atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and basilar invagination (BI) and to investigate its possible causes. METHODS: We report 4 cases with vertical AAD and BI who postoperatively presented with neurogenic dysphagia, dysarthria, and bucking after undergoing anatomical reduction. RESULTS: Patients underwent revision surgery to achieve partial reduction and demonstrated remarkable recovery of 9 , 10 and 11 nerve deficits. CONCLUSION: Performing OCF in the over-distraction position to treat vertical AAD may caudally displace the brainstem relative to the cranial base, resulting in traction injury to the 9th, 10th and 11th nerves where they exit the skull base through the jugular foramen.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523383
[Au] Autor:Kwok M; Eslick GD
[Ad] Address:The Whiteley-Martin Research Centre, Discipline of Surgery, Sydney Medical School, Nepean Hospital, The University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of Vocal and Laryngeal Pathologies Among Professional Singers: A Meta-analysis.
[So] Source:J Voice;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4588
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Professional singers are more likely to develop laryngeal pathologies and symptoms associated with misuse and overuse of the voice. However, different studies have shown conflicting evidence. We aim to perform a systematic review and quantitative meta-analysis to determine the prevalence and risk of laryngeal pathologies and symptoms among professional singers. METHODS: Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL) were searched, with no language restrictions. From 3368 potential studies, a total of 21 studies met our inclusion criteria. A systematic review of the literature was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies that reported the risk of laryngeal pathologies in singers were included. Data were pooled by a random effects model and the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: There was a positive relationship between singing and laryngeal pathologies. There was an increased risk of hoarseness (OR: 2.00, 95% CI: 1.61-2.49), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.19-1.77), Reinke edema (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.08-4.30), and polyps (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.06-4.14) in professional singers. CONCLUSION: Professional singers are at an increased risk of laryngeal pathologies and symptoms associated with vocal misuse and overuse, particularly hoarseness, GERD, edema, and polyps.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29267506
[Au] Autor:Zhang ZJ; Zheng ML; Nie Y; Niu ZQ
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, the Cangzhou Central Hospital, Cangzhou, Hebei, China.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Arndt-endobronchial blocker plus laryngeal mask airway with left-sided double-lumen endobronchial tube in one-lung ventilation in thoracic surgery in the morbidly obese.
[So] Source:Braz J Med Biol Res;51(2):e6825, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1414-431X
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and performance of Arndt-endobronchial blocker (Arndt) combined with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) compared with left-sided double-lumen endobronchial tube (L-DLT) in morbidly obese patients in one-lung ventilation (OLV). In a prospective, randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 80 morbidly obese patients (ASA I-III, aged 20-70) undergoing general anesthesia for elective thoracic surgeries were randomly allocated into groups Arndt (n=40) and L-DLT (n=40). In group Arndt, a LMA™ Proseal was placed followed by an Arndt-endobronchial blocker. In group L-DLT, patients were intubated with a left-sided double-lumen endotracheal tube. Primary endpoints were the airway establishment, ease of insertion, oxygenation, lung collapse and surgical field exposure. Results showed similar ease of airway establishment and tube/device insertion between the two groups. Oxygen arterial pressure (PaO2) of patients in the Arndt group was significantly higher than L-DLT (154±46 vs 105±52 mmHg; P<0.05). Quality of lung collapse and surgical field exposure in the Arndt group was significantly better than L-DLT (effective rate 100 vs 90%; P<0.05). Duration of surgery and anesthesia were significantly shorter in the Arndt group (2.4±1.7 vs 3.1±1.8 and 2.8±1.9 vs 3.8±1.8 h, respectively; P<0.05). Incidence of hoarseness of voice and incidence and severity of throat pain at the post-anesthesia care unit and 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery were significantly lower in the Arndt group (P<0.05). Findings suggested that Arndt-endobronchial blocker combined with LMA can serve as a promising alternative for morbidly obese patients in OLV in thoracic surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation
Laryngeal Masks/standards
Obesity, Morbid/surgery
One-Lung Ventilation/instrumentation
Thoracic Surgical Procedures/instrumentation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Double-Blind Method
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal/methods
Male
Middle Aged
One-Lung Ventilation/methods
Operative Time
Pain, Postoperative/etiology
Pharyngitis/etiology
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Atelectasis
Reproducibility of Results
Thoracic Surgical Procedures/methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventilators, Mechanical/standards
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28466355
[Au] Autor:Khalaf M; Matar N
[Ad] Address:Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hotel Dieu de France Hospital, Saint-Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon.
[Ti] Title:Translation and transcultural adaptation of the VHI-10 questionnaire: the VHI-10lb.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;274(8):3139-3145, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Subjective assessment tools are essential in voice disorders evaluation. The Voice Handicap Index-30 (VHI-30) and the Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) are the most studied and used questionnaires to assess the severity of the handicap caused by hoarseness on the quality of life of dysphonic patients and, therefore, guiding physician's therapeutic decision making. The aim of our study is to validate a Lebanese version of the VHI-10. The Lebanese Arabic version of the VHI-10 (VHI-10lb) was obtained after a forward translation towards Lebanese Arabic then a back-translation towards English and a pilot study. It was then submitted to 154 participants with clinical dysphonia and 100 healthy subjects. The questionnaire's intrinsic parameters such as the reliability, the reproducibility, the validity, the sensitivity, and the study of the correlation between each item and the total score were measured for the validation of the questionnaire. The results show a high internal consistency of the VHI-10lb (Cronbach's α 0.915) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.963 in the reliability analysis (p < 0.001). The VHI-10lb is also found to be clinically valid (p < 0.001) and sensitive to the improvement of the quality of life after treatment of dysphonic patients (p < 0.001). The Lebanese version of the VHI-10, the VHI-10lb, can be used to self-assess the severity of the impact of dysphonia on the quality of life of the affected patients. This study allows to add the VHI-10lb to the voice evaluation tools adapted to the Lebanese population.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Quality of Life
Translations
Voice Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Lebanon
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics/methods
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Voice Disorders/diagnosis
Voice Disorders/psychology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-017-4585-9

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[PMID]: 29380938
[Au] Autor:Zeitler M; Fingland P; Tikka T; Douglas CM; Montgomery J
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, UK.
[Ti] Title:Deprivation in relation to urgent suspicion of head and neck cancer referrals in Glasgow.
[So] Source:Clin Otolaryngol;, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1749-4486
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To examine deprivation measured by the Scottish index of multiple deprivation (SIMD) and its relation to urgent suspicion of head and neck cancer referrals. A secondary aim was to examine the symptomatology generating urgent suspicion of cancer (USOC) referrals by SIMD category. METHODS: All "urgent suspicion of cancer" referrals to the GGC ENT department over a one-year period, between 2015 and 2016, were reviewed. Information was recorded anonymously and included demographics and red flag referral symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 1998 patients were assessed, 43.4% (n = 867) were male. A total of 171 (8.6%) patients had primary head and neck cancer. A total of 61 patients had other types of cancer, giving an all cause cancer rate of 11.6%. About 71.3% of primary patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) were male. The most common SIMD category observed was SIMD1, the most common SIMD category yielding a primary head and neck cancer diagnosis was SIMD1. Neck lump was the commonest symptom amongst all SIMD categories. CONCLUSION: A link between deprivation and USOC referrals has been established. A difference in gender distribution between referrals and HNC was observed, more females are referred but a significantly higher number of patients with HNC are males. Neck lump is a very strong referral indicator for HNC and intermittent hoarseness is not. The findings from this analysis could be used to refine local referral patterns and priority of referral.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/coa.13077

  6 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29269071
[Au] Autor:Sebaaly A; Boubez G; Sunna T; Wang Z; Alam E; Christopoulos A; Shedid D
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Centre Hopitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon. Electronic address: amersebaaly@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Diffuse Idiopathic Hyperostosis Manifesting as Dysphagia and Bilateral Cord Paralysis: A Case Report and Literature Review.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;111:79-85, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Diffuse idiopathic hyperostosis (DISH) is characterized by calcifications affecting mainly the spinal anterior longitudinal ligament. This disease is mainly asymptomatic but cervical osteophytes can sometimes cause dysphagia (DISHphagia), hoarseness, and even dyspnea. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report, for the first time in the medical literature, a case of a 76-year-old patient with DISH causing an important dysphagia as well as bilateral vocal cord paralysis causing critical dyspnea. The patient was surgically treated by anterior resection of the osteophytes and application of bone wax, with significant clinical improvement and no radiologic recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A thorough literature review didn't yield any article reporting on bilateral vocal cord paralysis caused by DISH. Management of this condition is typically multidisciplinary, and treatment of cervical osteophyte-associated dysphagia or respiratory compromise is primarily medical, after performing necessary tests to rule out other causes of dysphagia. Surgical intervention is warranted when medical treatment fails, when there is weight loss, a significant airway compromise or sleeping alterations. A treatment algorithm is proposed in the end of this review for symptomatic anterior osteophytes caused by DISH in the mobile cervical spine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496353
[Au] Autor:Madabhavi I; Bhardawa V; Modi M; Patel A; Sarkar M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical and Pediatric Oncology, Gujarat Cancer Research Institute, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Electronic address: irappamadabhavi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Primary synovial sarcoma (SS) of larynx: An unusual site.
[So] Source:Oral Oncol;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0593
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are heterogeneous disorders comprises myriad subtypes originated from mesenchymal stem cells. Synovial sarcomas (SSs) are belligerent malignant tumours included in this group affecting extremities of patients' age ranging between 15 and 35 years. SS taking place in head and neck region is rare event and primary laryngeal involvement is even rarer happening. There are 20 odd published cases documented in world literature so far. Here we are presenting primary laryngeal SS occurred in 31 year old male patient initially mimicking laryngeal carcinoma as patient was chronic smoker and classic symptom of hoarseness of voice.
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494321
[Au] Autor:Stachler RJ; Francis DO; Schwartz SR; Damask CC; Digoy GP; Krouse HJ; McCoy SJ; Ouellette DR; Patel RR; Reavis CCW; Smith LJ; Smith M; Strode SW; Woo P; Nnacheta LC
[Ad] Address:1 Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update).
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(1_suppl):S1-S42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on treating patients who present with dysphonia, which is characterized by altered vocal quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication and/or quality of life. Dysphonia affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in its life. This guideline applies to all age groups evaluated in a setting where dysphonia would be identified or managed. It is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and treat patients with dysphonia. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with dysphonia, based on current best evidence. Expert consensus to fill evidence gaps, when used, is explicitly stated and supported with a detailed evidence profile for transparency. Specific objectives of the guideline are to reduce inappropriate variations in care, produce optimal health outcomes, and minimize harm. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of advanced practice nursing, bronchoesophagology, consumer advocacy, family medicine, geriatric medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, neurology, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, professional voice, pulmonology, and speech-language pathology. Action Statements The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination to identify factors where expedited laryngeal evaluation is indicated. These include, but are not limited to, recent surgical procedures involving the head, neck, or chest; recent endotracheal intubation; presence of concomitant neck mass; respiratory distress or stridor; history of tobacco abuse; and whether the patient is a professional voice user. (2) Clinicians should advocate voice therapy for patients with dysphonia from a cause amenable to voice therapy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should identify dysphonia in a patient with altered voice quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication or reduces quality of life (QOL). (2) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination for underlying causes of dysphonia and factors that modify management. (3) Clinicians should perform laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform laryngoscopy, when dysphonia fails to resolve or improve within 4 weeks or irrespective of duration if a serious underlying cause is suspected. (4) Clinicians should perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, before prescribing voice therapy and document/communicate the results to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). (5) Clinicians should advocate for surgery as a therapeutic option for patients with dysphonia with conditions amenable to surgical intervention, such as suspected malignancy, symptomatic benign vocal fold lesions that do not respond to conservative management, or glottic insufficiency. (6) Clinicians should offer, or refer to a clinician who can offer, botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of dysphonia caused by spasmodic dysphonia and other types of laryngeal dystonia. (7) Clinicians should inform patients with dysphonia about control/preventive measures. (8) Clinicians should document resolution, improvement or worsened symptoms of dysphonia, or change in QOL of patients with dysphonia after treatment or observation. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 1 action: (1) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe antibiotics to treat dysphonia. The guideline update group made recommendations against other actions: (1) Clinicians should not obtain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patients with a primary voice complaint prior to visualization of the larynx. (2) Clinicians should not prescribe antireflux medications to treat isolated dysphonia, based on symptoms alone attributed to suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), without visualization of the larynx. (3) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe corticosteroids for patients with dysphonia prior to visualization of the larynx. The policy level for the following recommendation about laryngoscopy at any time was an option: (1) Clinicians may perform diagnostic laryngoscopy at any time in a patient with dysphonia. Disclaimer This clinical practice guideline is not intended as an exhaustive source of guidance for managing dysphonia (hoarseness). Rather, it is designed to assist clinicians by providing an evidence-based framework for decision-making strategies. The guideline is not intended to replace clinical judgment or establish a protocol for all individuals with this condition, and it may not provide the only appropriate approach to diagnosing and managing this problem. Differences from Prior Guideline (1) Incorporation of new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply (2) Inclusion of 3 new guidelines, 16 new systematic reviews, and 4 new randomized controlled trials (3) Inclusion of a consumer advocate on the guideline update group (4) Changes to 9 KASs from the original guideline (5) New KAS 3 (escalation of care) and KAS 13 (outcomes) (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs for patients with dysphonia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751030

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[PMID]: 29494316
[Au] Autor:Stachler RJ; Francis DO; Schwartz SR; Damask CC; Digoy GP; Krouse HJ; McCoy SJ; Ouellette DR; Patel RR; Reavis CCW; Smith LJ; Smith M; Strode SW; Woo P; Nnacheta LC
[Ad] Address:1 Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update) Executive Summary.
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(3):409-426, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on treating patients presenting with dysphonia, which is characterized by altered vocal quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication and/or quality of life. Dysphonia affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in its life. This guideline applies to all age groups evaluated in a setting where dysphonia would be identified or managed. It is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and treat patients with dysphonia. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with dysphonia, based on current best evidence. Expert consensus to fill evidence gaps, when used, is explicitly stated and supported with a detailed evidence profile for transparency. Specific objectives of the guideline are to reduce inappropriate variations in care, produce optimal health outcomes, and minimize harm. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of advanced practice nursing, bronchoesophagology, consumer advocacy, family medicine, geriatric medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, neurology, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, professional voice, pulmonology, and speech-language pathology. Action Statements The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination to identify factors where expedited laryngeal evaluation is indicated. These include but are not limited to recent surgical procedures involving the head, neck, or chest; recent endotracheal intubation; presence of concomitant neck mass; respiratory distress or stridor; history of tobacco abuse; and whether the patient is a professional voice user. (2) Clinicians should advocate voice therapy for patients with dysphonia from a cause amenable to voice therapy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should identify dysphonia in a patient with altered voice quality, pitch, loudness, or vocal effort that impairs communication or reduces quality of life (QOL). (2) Clinicians should assess the patient with dysphonia by history and physical examination for underlying causes of dysphonia and factors that modify management. (3) Clinicians should perform laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform laryngoscopy, when dysphonia fails to resolve or improve within 4 weeks or irrespective of duration if a serious underlying cause is suspected. (4) Clinicians should perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, or refer to a clinician who can perform diagnostic laryngoscopy, before prescribing voice therapy and document/communicate the results to the speech-language pathologist (SLP). (5) Clinicians should advocate for surgery as a therapeutic option for patients with dysphonia with conditions amenable to surgical intervention, such as suspected malignancy, symptomatic benign vocal fold lesions that do not respond to conservative management, or glottic insufficiency. (6) Clinicians should offer, or refer to a clinician who can offer, botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of dysphonia caused by spasmodic dysphonia and other types of laryngeal dystonia. (7) Clinicians should inform patients with dysphonia about control/preventive measures. (8) Clinicians should document resolution, improvement or worsened symptoms of dysphonia, or change in QOL of patients with dysphonia after treatment or observation. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 1 action: (1) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe antibiotics to treat dysphonia. The guideline update group made recommendations against other actions: (1) Clinicians should not obtain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patients with a primary voice complaint prior to visualization of the larynx. (2) Clinicians should not prescribe antireflux medications to treat isolated dysphonia, based on symptoms alone attributed to suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), without visualization of the larynx. (3) Clinicians should not routinely prescribe corticosteroids in patients with dysphonia prior to visualization of the larynx. The policy level for the following recommendation about laryngoscopy at any time was an option: (1) Clinicians may perform diagnostic laryngoscopy at any time in a patient with dysphonia. Differences from Prior Guideline (1) Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply (2) Inclusion of 3 new guidelines, 16 new systematic reviews, and 4 new randomized controlled trials (3) Inclusion of a consumer advocate on the guideline update group (4) Changes to 9 KASs from the original guideline (5) New KAS 3 (escalation of care) and KAS 13 (outcomes) (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs for patients with dysphonia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751031

  10 / 5312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494315
[Au] Autor:Krouse HJ; Reavis CCW; Stachler RJ; Francis DO; O'Connor S
[Ad] Address:1 University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Title:Plain Language Summary: Hoarseness (Dysphonia).
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;158(3):427-431, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6817
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This plain language summary for patients serves as an overview in explaining hoarseness (dysphonia). The summary applies to patients in all age groups and is based on the 2018 "Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update)." The evidence-based guideline includes research to support more effective identification and management of patients with hoarseness (dysphonia). The primary purpose of the guideline is to improve the quality of care for patients with hoarseness (dysphonia) based on current best evidence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0194599817751137


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