Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hookworm and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29522552
[Au] Autor:Barbosa CV; Barreto MM; Andrade RJ; Sodré F; d'Avila-Levy CM; Peralta JM; Igreja RP; de Macedo HW; Santos HLC
[Ad] Address:Laboratório de Estudos Integrados em Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz/Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Intestinal parasite infections in a rural community of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil): Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis subtypes.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193860, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Intestinal parasitic infections are considered a serious public health problem and widely distributed worldwide, mainly in urban and rural environments of tropical and subtropical countries. Globally, soil-transmitted helminths and protozoa are the most common intestinal parasites. Blastocystis sp. is a highly prevalent suspected pathogenic protozoan, and considered an unusual protist due to its significant genetic diversity and host plasticity. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: A total of 294 stool samples were collected from inhabitants of three rural valleys in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The stool samples were evaluated by parasitological methods, fecal culture, nested PCR and PCR/Sequencing. Overall prevalence by parasitological analyses was 64.3% (189 out of 294 cases). Blastocystis sp. (55.8%) was the most prevalent, followed by Endolimax nana (18.7%), Entamoeba histolytica complex (7.1%), hookworm infection (7.1%), Entomoeba coli (5.8%), Giardia intestinalis (4.1%), Iodamoeba butchilii (1.0%), Trichuris trichiura (1.0%), Pentatrichomonas hominis (0.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (0.7%). Prevalence of IPIs was significantly different by gender. Phylogenetic analysis of Blastocystis sp. and BLAST search revealed five different subtypes: ST3 (34.0%), ST1 (27.0%), ST2 (27.0%), ST4 (3.5%), ST8 (7.0%) and a non-identified subtype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that intestinal parasite infection rates in rural areas of the Sumidouro municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil are still high and remain a challenge to public health. Moreover, our data reveals significant genetic heterogeneity of Blastocystis sp. subtypes and a possible novel subtype, whose confirmation will require additional data. Our study contributes to the understanding of potential routes of transmission, epidemiology, and genetic diversity of Blastocystis sp. in rural areas both at a regional and global scale.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193860

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[PMID]: 29509952
[Au] Autor:Adugna S; Kebede T; Mekonnen Z; Degarege A; Liang S; Erko B
[Ad] Address:Addis Ababa University, College of Health Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic performance of Mini Parasep® solvent-free faecal parasite concentrator relative to Kato-Katz and McMaster for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: In this cross-sectional study, we compared the performance of Mini Parasep® solvent-free (SF) faecal parasite concentrator, Kato-Katz thick smear and McMaster techniques for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections among children in Wosha Soyama Primary School, Ethiopia. Methods: Stool samples were collected from 381 children and examined for intestinal parasitic infections using Mini Parasep® SF faecal parasite concentrator, Kato-Katz thick smear and McMaster techniques. Results: About 86.1% of children were infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite based on combined results of the three techniques. The sensitivity and negative predictive values of Mini Parasep® SF, Kato-Katz and McMaster tests for detecting at least one species of intestinal parasite infections were 90.2% and 62.4%, 80.0% and 44.5%, and 55.2% and 26.5%, respectively. While Mini Parasep® SF was more sensitive in detecting Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni and Hymenolepis nana infections, Kato-Katz was more sensitive in detecting Trichuris trichiura infection, and McMaster had higher sensitivity in diagnosing hookworm infection. Conclusions: The Mini Parasep® SF faecal parasite concentrator technique showed better performance than the Kato-Katz and McMaster techniques for the detection of intestinal helminth infections in stool samples, particularly for S. mansoni, A. lumbricoides and H. nana. Hence, Mini Parasep® SF could be used as one of the suitable faecal examination methods for surveillance and monitoring of preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/try010

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[PMID]: 29494579
[Au] Autor:Ibikounlé M; Onzo-Aboki A; Doritchamou J; Tougoué JJ; Boko PM; Savassi BS; Siko EJ; Daré A; Batcho W; Massougbodji A; Kindé-Gazard DA; Kaboré A
[Ad] Address:National Control Program of Communicable Diseases, Ministry of Health of Benin, Cotonou, Benin.
[Ti] Title:Results of the first mapping of soil-transmitted helminths in Benin: Evidence of countrywide hookworm predominance.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006241, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: National mapping of soil-transmitted helminth infections (STH) was conducted for the first time in all of the 77 districts of Benin (West Africa) from 2013 to 2015. This mapping aimed to provide basic epidemiological data essential for the implementation of the national strategy against the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the context of achieving the WHO target of controlling these infections by 2020. METHODS: In each district, 5 schools were purposively selected in 5 villages and 50 school-children (25 girls and 25 boys) from ages 8 to 14 years were randomly enrolled in each school. In total, 19,250 stool samples of school children (9,625 girls and 9,625 boys) from 385 schools were examined by Kato-Katz technique. RESULTS: The three major species of STH (hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura) were observed with intra- and inter-specific variations in the prevalence and the intensity of these parasites. Hookworm infection was present in all of the surveyed districts with an average prevalence of 17.14% (95% CI 16.6%-17.6%). Among the infected schoolchildren, at national level, 90.82%, 6.73% and 2.45% of infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities respectively. A. lumbricoides infection, with a national average prevalence of 5.35% (95% CI 5.00%-5.60%),was the second most prevalent STH, and 84.37%, 14.27% and 1.36% of the infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities, respectively. T. trichiura had a national average prevalence of 1.15% (95% CI 0.90%-1.20%) and 80.45%, 13.18% and 6.36% infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities, respectively. The national cumulative prevalence of the three STH infections was 22.74% (95% CI 22.15%-23.33%), with58.44% (45/77) of the districts requiring mass treatment according to WHO recommendations. In all of the surveyed districts, multiple infections by STH species were common, and boys seemed more at risk of hookworm and Ascaris infections. CONCLUSIONS: This first national mapping provided an overview of the epidemiological pattern of STH infections and was essential for the implementation of a control strategy with an effective preventive chemotherapy treatment (PCT). Results show that while preventive chemotherapy is not indicated for children in 32/77 districts, 43 require annual deworming and two require twice yearly deworming. If no environmental change occurs, and no mass treatment is delivered, prevalence is likely to remain stable for many years owing to poor hygiene and sanitation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006241

  4 / 3421 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29486790
[Au] Autor:Hürlimann E; Silué KD; Zouzou F; Ouattara M; Schmidlin T; Yapi RB; Houngbedji CA; Dongo K; Kouadio BA; Koné S; Bonfoh B; N'Goran EK; Utzinger J; Acka-Douabélé CA; Raso G
[Ad] Address:Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002, Basel, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Effect of an integrated intervention package of preventive chemotherapy, community-led total sanitation and health education on the prevalence of helminth and intestinal protozoa infections in Côte d'Ivoire.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):115, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Preventive chemotherapy with donated anthelminthic drugs is the cornerstone for the control of helminthiases. However, reinfection can occur rapidly in the absence of clean water and sanitation coupled with unhygienic behaviour. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of an integrated package of interventions, consisting of preventive chemotherapy, community-led total sanitation (CLTS) and health education, on the prevalence of helminth and intestinal protozoa infections and on participants' knowledge, attitude, practice and beliefs (KAPB) towards these diseases including water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in nine communities of south-central Côte d'Ivoire to assess people's infection with helminths and intestinal protozoa and KAPB. Subsequently, interventions were targeted to five communities, while the remaining communities served as control. The intervention encouraged latrine construction and an evaluation was done 6-7 months later to determine open defecation status of the respective communities. Anthelminthic treatment was provided to all community members. A follow-up cross-sectional survey was conducted approximately one year later, using the same procedures. RESULTS: Overall, 810 people had complete baseline and follow-up data and were given anthelminthic treatment. The baseline prevalence of hookworm, Schistosoma haematobium, Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma mansoni and Ascaris lumbricoides was 31.1%, 7.0%, 2.0%, 1.0% and 0.3%, respectively. Four of the five intervention communities were classified open-defecation free. For hookworm infection, we observed higher negative changes in terms of proportion of decrease (-0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI): - 0.16, -0.04) and higher egg reduction rate (64.9 vs 15.2%) when comparing intervention with control communities. For intestinal protozoa, prevalence reduction was higher in intervention compared to control communities (8.2 vs 2.6%) and WASH indicators and intervention outcomes associated with lower odds for infection at follow-up. The intervention significantly impacted on reported latrine use (before: 15.5%, after: 94.6%), open defecation in the community surroundings (before: 75.0%, after: 16.7%) and awareness for environmental contamination through open defecation (before: 20.4%, after: 52.2%). CONCLUSIONS: An integrated package of interventions consisting of preventive chemotherapy, health education and CLTS reduces the prevalence of helminth and intestinal protozoa infection. Additional studies in other social-ecological settings are warranted to confirm our findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2642-x

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[PMID]: 29478163
[Au] Autor:Amoah ID; Reddy P; Seidu R; Stenström TA
[Ad] Address:Institute for Water and Wastewater Technology, Durban University of Technology, PO Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa. amoahkid@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Removal of helminth eggs by centralized and decentralized wastewater treatment plants in South Africa and Lesotho: health implications for direct and indirect exposure to the effluents.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wastewater may contain contaminants harmful to human health; hence, there is the need for treatment before discharge. Centralized wastewater treatment systems are the favored treatment options globally, but these are not necessarily superior in reduction of pathogens as compared to decentralized wastewater treatment systems (collectively called DEWATS). This study was therefore undertaken to assess the soil-transmitted helminth (STH) and Taenia sp. egg reduction efficiency of selected anaerobic baffled reactors and planted gravel filters compared to centralized wastewater treatment plants in South Africa and Lesotho. The risk of ascariasis with exposure to effluents from the centralized wastewater treatment plants was also assessed using the quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) approach. Eggs of Ascaris spp., hookworm, Trichuris spp., Taenia spp., and Toxocara spp. were commonly detected in the untreated wastewater. The DEWATS plants removed between 95 and 100% of the STH and Taenia sp. eggs, with centralized plants removing between 67 and 100%. Helminth egg concentrations in the final effluents from the centralized wastewater treatment plants were consistently higher than those in the WHO recommended guideline (≤ 1 helminth egg/L) for agricultural use resulting in higher risk of ascariasis. Therefore, in conclusion, DEWATS plants may be more efficient in reducing the concentration of helminth eggs in wastewater, resulting in lower risks of STH infections upon exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-018-1503-7

  6 / 3421 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29432423
[Au] Autor:Mupfasoni D; Mikhailov A; Mbabazi P; King J; Gyorkos TW; Montresor A
[Ad] Address:Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Estimation of the number of women of reproductive age in need of preventive chemotherapy for soil-transmitted helminth infections.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006269, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Soil-transmitted helminth infections are among the most common infections in developing countries. Globally, as many as 2 billion people are considered to be at risk for soil-transmitted-helminth (STH) infections. Preschool children (PSAC), school-age children (SAC) and women of reproductive age (WRA) are at high risk of STH-attributable morbidity and preventive chemotherapy (PC) for STH is recommended by the World health Organization (WHO). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Over the last five years, PC coverage in PSAC and SAC has gradually increased, while coverage in WRA has lagged. Estimating the numbers of WRA in each endemic country would inform scale-up in this group. A two-step process was used: 1) total numbers of girls and women between 15 and 49 years of age were obtained from the United Nations World Population Prospects 2015 database; and 2) the proportion in need of PC was obtained primarily from extrapolation from the WHO PC Databank. WRA were divided into four sub-groups reflecting different reproductive life stages, each having a potentially different interface with the health care system and, consequently, presenting different opportunities for intervention strategies. Worldwide, we estimated that 688 million WRA in 102 countries were in need of PC for STH in 2015. The South-East Asia (49%) and Africa regions (26%) had the highest numbers. Adolescent girls accounted for 16%, while pregnant and lactating women each represented 10%. Over 25 million pregnant women alone were estimated living in areas where the prevalence of hookworm and T. trichiura infection was ≥ 20%. Approximately 20% of at-risk WRA had received deworming with albendazole through the Global Programme to Eliminate Filariasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To close current gaps in coverage, numbers of WRA in need of PC for STH are essential for operational strategies to control STH infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006269

  7 / 3421 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29469448
[Au] Autor:Xiao-Jun Z; Wei-Sheng J; Shu-Ying X; Jun G; Zhao-Jun L; Chun-Qin H; Yue-Min L; Fang-Yu Y; Hong-Gen C
[Ad] Address:Jiangxi Provincial Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Nanchang 330096, China.
[Ti] Title:[Trends of soil-transmitted nematode infections in Jiangxi Province].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Xue Xi Chong Bing Fang Zhi Za Zhi;29(6):710-715, 2017 Dec 05.
[Is] ISSN:1005-6661
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To analyze the status and trends of soil-transmitted nematode infections in Jiangxi Province from 1989 to 2014, so as to provide the evidence for generating the strategy of soil-transmitted nematode prevention and control. METHODS: The data of three epidemiological surveys on human parasitic diseases (in 1989, 2002 and 2014) were classified and analyzed. The stool examination by Kato-Katz's thick smear method was adopted for the investigation of soil-transmitted nematode infections. RESULTS: The total infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodes decreased by 91.89% from 77.67% in 1989 to 6.30% in 2014, in which the infection rate of decreased by 98.78% from 71.11% to 0.87%, the infection rate of decreased by 96.80% from 29.67% to 0.95%, and the infection rate of hookworm declined by 73.57% from 17.63% to 4.66%. The infection rates of soil-transmitted nematodes in the female were higher than those in the male in three surveys. In different ecological districts, the infection rates of soil-transmitted nematodes in the female were also higher than those in the male, except in Zhe-Min Ecological District in 2002 and 2014. A declined trend of the infection was showed in all age-groups in the three surveys, but it slowed down by the growth of age, i.e., the reduction rate was 97.03% in the age group of < 10 years while 80.62% in the age group of >70 years. In 2014, the number of persons infected with soil-transmitted nematodes occupied 65.4% of the whole number of persons infected with intestinal parasites. CONCLUSIONS: The mean infection rates of soil-transmitted nematodes decrease obviously in human population in different ecological districts, but the soil-transmitted nematodes are still the main species in intestinal parasite infections. The sequence of dominant species changes from , hookworm and in 1989 to hookworm, and in 2014. The rural female and elder people are the key population, while hookworm is the key species for the prevention and control of soil-transmitted nematodes.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.16250/j.32.1374.2017151

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[PMID]: 29469367
[Au] Autor:Yi-Sha H; Yan-Jing L; Chao-Yong X
[Ad] Address:Nanjing Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210003, China.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of human intestinal nematode infections in Nanjing City from 2006 to 2015].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Xue Xi Chong Bing Fang Zhi Za Zhi;29(5):637-639, 2017 Jul 28.
[Is] ISSN:1005-6661
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To analyze the epidemiological situation of human intestinal nematode infections in Nanjing City from 2006 to 2015, so as to provide the reference for formulating prevention and control measures. METHODS: The surveillance data of human intestinal nematode infections in Nanjing City from 2006 to 2015 were collected and analyzed statistically. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2015, 98 804 person-times of residents were surveyed in Nanjing City, and 465 person-times of residents were detected with intestinal nematode infections. The highest infection rate was in 2006 (1.97%), and the lowest in 2013 and 2015 (both 0.05%). Moreover, the positive rate of human intestinal nematode infections showed a significantly declining trend in total ( 552.19, < 0.001). Meanwhile, the numbers of , hookworm and cases were 329, 98 and 25 respectively, and the infection rates were 0.33%, 0.10% and 0.03% respectively. Among them, 443 cases had mild infection intensity (98.66%). There were 462 cases of single-infection (99.35%), and 3 of co-infection of two parasites (0.65%). From 2006 to 2015, 92 539 person-times of children under 12 years old were surveyed for infection and 352 cases were detected with infection. Moreover, the positive rate showed a significantly decreasing trend in total ( 147.94, <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The control effect of human intestinal nematode infections in Nanjing City is remarkable. However, the surveillance and health education in key groups still should be strengthened, and the prevention and control programs should be adjusted promptly to further consolidating the effectiveness of intestinal nematode disease prevention and control.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.16250/j.32.1374.2017053

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[PMID]: 29469358
[Au] Autor:Ya-Lan Z; Yan-Kun Z; Wei-Qi C; Yan D; Xi-Meng L; Peng L; Hong-Wei Z
[Ad] Address:Henan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou 450016, China.
[Ti] Title:[Survey and analysis of epidemic status of principal human parasitosis in ecological region of Huaiyang hills of Henan Province in 2015].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Xue Xi Chong Bing Fang Zhi Za Zhi;29(5):607-611, 2017 Jul 24.
[Is] ISSN:1005-6661
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To understand the epidemic status of principal human parasitosis in the ecological region of Huaiyang hills of Henan Province. METHODS: According to the scheme of The 3rd National Survey of Principal Human Parasites made by National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, the survey was performed based on the ecological regions. The stratified cluster sampling was made combined with the economic and geographical conditions. The infections of intestinal helminths and protozoans in permanent residents were respectively detected by Kato-Kats technique and iodine solution. infection was detected by the cellophane swab method in children aged 3 to 6 years. RESULTS: Totally 6 710 residents in 26 survey spots from 9 counties were detected, in which 528 children aged 3 to 6 years were detected for infection. Eleven kinds of parasites were found in this survey, including 5 species of helminthes and 6 species of protozoans. The infection rates of overall parasites, helminthes and protozoans were respectively 1.65%, 1.07% and 0.61%. The infection rate of in the children aged 3 to 6 years was 3.79%. Only 0.10 percent of the infections were co-infection, and all were infected by 2 kinds of parasites. The principal parasites in this district were (0.31%), (0.28%) and hookworm (0.27%). The infection rate among children was 3.79% by the cellophane swab method. The infections of protozoans were found in all age groups. In the group aged 9 years and below, the maximum kinds of parasites were found. CONCLUSIONS: The infection rates of principal human parasites in Huaiyang hilly ecological region of Henan have decreased sharply, but more efforts still should be paid on the prevention and control of parasitosis in children.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.16250/j.32.1374.2017064

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[PMID]: 29455921
[Au] Autor:Ocaña-Losada C; Cuenca-Gómez JA; Cabezas-Fernández MT; Vázquez-Villegas J; Soriano-Pérez MJ; Cabeza-Barrera I; Salas-Coronas J
[Ad] Address:Unidad de Medicina Tropical, Hospital de Poniente, El Ejido, Almería, España. Electronic address: crstnol.89@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Características clínicas y epidemiológicas de la parasitación intestinal por Blastocystis hominis. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of intestinal parasite infection by Blastocystis hominis.
[So] Source:Rev Clin Esp;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1578-1860
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng; spa
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis) is one of the most common intestinal parasites isolated in humans. The parasite can cause gastrointestinal symptoms or, in most cases, remain asymptomatic. There are issues concerning the parasite's pathogenic character. The aim of this study was to analyse the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the parasite infection by B. hominis, with or without other parasitic co-infections. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An observational retrospective study was conducted of B. hominis isolates in faeces from October 2004 to March 2016 in a tropical medicine unit. We reviewed all patients with a parasite infection, exclusively or not by B. hominis. RESULTS: We studied 3070 patients, 570 (18%) of whom were diagnosed with B. hominis infection, which was the only isolate in 245 (43%) of the 570 patients. A total of 325 (57%) patients presented other parasitic co-infections (Entamoeba histolytic or Entamoeba dispar, Strongyloides stercoralis, hookworm and Schistosoma spp.). The main symptom was abdominal pain (41.8%). In 31.2% of cases, the parasite was detected in the imported diseases screening of asymptomatic patients. Of those who underwent treatment with metronidazole, 78.2% improved. The parasite was neutralised in 82.6% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Parasite infection by B. hominis is one of the most common diseases in our tropical medicine unit. Most patients are asymptomatic, or their symptoms can be attributed to other parasite infections. In those cases in which symptoms persist without being able to attribute them to other causes, a specific treatment is recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[St] Status:Publisher


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