Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29320823
[Au] Autor:Shin J; Ahn KS; Suh GH; Kim HJ; Jeong HS; Kim BS; Choi E; Shin SS
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
[Ti] Title:First Blindness Cases of Horses Infected with Setaria Digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in the Republic of Korea.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):667-671, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ocular setariases of cattle were reported but those of equine hosts have never been reported in the Republic of Korea (Korea). We found motile worms in the aqueous humor of 15 horses (Equus spp.) from 12 localities in southern parts of Korea between January 2004 and November 2017. After the affected animals were properly restrained under sedation and local anesthesia, 10 ml disposable syringe with a 16-gauge needle was inserted into the anterior chamber of the affected eye to successfully remove the parasites. The male worm that was found in 7 of the cases showed a pair of lateral appendages near the posterior terminal end of the body. The papillar arrangement was 3 pairs of precloacal, a pair of adcloacal, and 3 pairs of postcloacal papillae, plus a central papilla just in front of the cloaca. The female worms found in the eyes of 8 horses were characterized by the tapering posterior terminal end of the body with a smooth knob. Worms were all identified as Setaria digitata (von Linstow, 1906) by the morphologic characteristics using light and electron microscopic observations. This is the first blindness cases of 15 horses infected with S. digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Korea.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blindness/etiology
Blindness/veterinary
Horse Diseases/etiology
Horse Diseases/parasitology
Horses
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/veterinary
Setaria Nematode/isolation & purification
Setariasis/complications
Setariasis/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Blindness/surgery
Female
Horse Diseases/surgery
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/methods
Republic of Korea
Setaria Nematode/anatomy & histology
Setaria Nematode/ultrastructure
Setariasis/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.667

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[PMID]: 29269546
[Au] Autor:Strang C; Newton R
[Ti] Title:Control and disease clearance after neurological EHV-1 in the UK.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(25):678-679, 2017 12 23.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disease Outbreaks/veterinary
Herpesviridae Infections/veterinary
Herpesvirus 1, Equid/isolation & purification
Horse Diseases/prevention & control
Sentinel Surveillance/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control
Herpesviridae Infections/epidemiology
Herpesviridae Infections/prevention & control
Horse Diseases/epidemiology
Horses
Male
Risk Assessment
United Kingdom/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171223
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5906

  3 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29269545
[Ti] Title:Equine disease surveillance: quarterly summary.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(25):674-677, 2017 12 23.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Disease Outbreaks/veterinary
Horse Diseases/epidemiology
Sentinel Surveillance/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bacterial Infections/epidemiology
Bacterial Infections/veterinary
Female
Horses
Male
Parasitic Diseases, Animal/epidemiology
United Kingdom/epidemiology
Virus Diseases/epidemiology
Virus Diseases/veterinary
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171223
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5900

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[PMID]: 29509311
[Au] Autor:Pollaris E; Haspeslagh M; Van den Wyngaert G; Vlaminck L
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Large Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 8920, Merelbeke, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Equine cheek teeth occlusal fissures: prevalence, association with dental wear abnormalities and occlusal angles.
[So] Source:Equine Vet J;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2042-3306
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fissures of the occlusal surface of equine cheek teeth are commonly encountered during oral examination but their aetiology is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of occlusal fissures in cadaver teeth. It is hypothesised that their prevalence is influenced by masticatory forces. Consequently, their possible association with wear disorders and occlusal angles were examined. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: The dental abnormalities and occlusal fissure findings in the cheek teeth of 143 cadaver heads were recorded. The cheek teeth occlusal angles were measured using the stiff-hinge technique. Multiple regression analyses were performed to establish possible relationships between age, sex, dental wear, occlusal angle and fissure prevalence. RESULTS: Occlusal fissures were found in 103/143 (72%) heads. Sex and age were determining factors in the prevalence of fissures. A similar prevalence was found in mandibular (54.1%) and maxillary teeth (45.9%, OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.95 - 1.29, p = 0.2). Mandibular fissures were more commonly located on the buccal aspect (OR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.16 - 1.65, p < 0.001) whereas for maxillary fissures there was no difference in prevalence between palatal and buccal aspects (OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 0.97 - 1.46, p = 0.1). Two main fissure types were identified. Type 1a fissures were the most prevalent type (39.5%). No significant correlation was found between the presence of wear abnormalities or the occlusal angle of cheek teeth, and the prevalence of fissures. MAIN LIMITATIONS: No dental histories were available. CONCLUSION: Equine cheek teeth show a high prevalence of occlusal fissures. Despite some evidence of predilection sites on the tooth surface that might indicate a mechanical aetiology for these lesions, no associations were found with wear abnormalities or occlusal angles of affected cheek teeth. Further histological and ultrastructural studies are warranted to elucidate their aetiology and possible role in other dental diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/evj.12828

  5 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29448222
[Au] Autor:Knezevic P; Aleksic Sabo V; Simin N; Lesjak M; Mimica-Dukic N
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 3, 21 000 Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia. Electronic address: petar.knezevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs.
[Ti] Title:A colorimetric broth microdilution method for assessment of Helicobacter pylori sensitivity to antimicrobial agents.
[So] Source:J Pharm Biomed Anal;152:271-278, 2018 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-264X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Helicobacter pylori is a major infective etiological agent of the upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. The bacterium exhibits resistance to various conventional antibiotics, being usually challenging for eradication. Since there is an urge to consider alternative therapeutic strategies, the aim of the study was to examine selected essential oils of plants belonging to families Cupressaceae (Juniperus communis) and Lamiaceae (Hyssopus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Melissa officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum and Thymus serpyllum) against H. pylori, using an improved microdilution broth method. The oils were examined in concentration range from 0.03 to 4 µL/mL. The method comprises Brain-heart infusion broth supplemented with yeast extract, horse serum and IsoVitaleX. After 3 day incubation, an equal volume of double strengthen Christensen's urea was added into each well and incubated for additional 4 h. In wells with present H. pylori, the medium changed color from yellow to purple, allowing MIC determination even without a microtitre plate reader. The microtitre format method is convenient as it is less expensive, easier to perform and requires less amount of an anti-H. pylori agent. The improved method enhances specificity to H. pylori, as fast urease activity is almost an exclusive property of this bacterium. The application of the second step incubation with Christensen's urea decreases the possibility of false positive/negative results due to contaminant growth or commonly poor H. pylori growth. Among the examined oils, J. communis, H. officinalis and O. basilicum were not active with the highest applied concentrations, while the most active was T. serpyllum, with MIC 2.0-4.0 µL/mL. This is the first report on essential oils activity of T. serpyllum and H. officinalis against H. pylori.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29353726
[Au] Autor:Czarnecka K; Chufarova N; Halczuk K; Maciejewska K; Girek M; Skibinski R; Jonczyk J; Bajda M; Kabzinski J; Majsterek I; Szymanski P
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Drug Analyses and Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Lodz, Muszynskiego 1, 90-151 Lodz, Poland. Electronic address: kamila.czarnecka@umed.lodz.pl.
[Ti] Title:Tetrahydroacridine derivatives with dichloronicotinic acid moiety as attractive, multipotent agents for Alzheimer's disease treatment.
[So] Source:Eur J Med Chem;145:760-769, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3254
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A novel series of 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine and 5,6-dichloronicotinic acid moiety were conjugated with different linkers. Afterwards new derivatives were evaluated as potential multifunctional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug candidates. All the compounds were synthesized and tested for capacity for the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) enzymes. Specifically, the most promising derivative 3b (IC = 1.02 nM) had higher inhibitory potency compared to the reference drug, tacrine. Consequently, kinetic studies of 3b compound showed a mixed-type inhibition of both AChE and BuChE. Afterwards the best potent AChE inhibitor has been examined on amyloid ß (Aß) self-induced aggregation. Furthermore, 3b compound was tested in various concentrations and had moderate activity against Aß aggregation. Inhibition of Aß aggregation was 46.63% and 19.41% at 50 µM and 5  µM concentrations, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxicity was observed for the mentioned concentrations. Therefore, 3b compound is a promising multipotent agent for the treatment of AD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism
Acridines/pharmacology
Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy
Butyrylcholinesterase/metabolism
Cholinesterase Inhibitors/pharmacology
Nicotinic Acids/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acridines/chemistry
Alzheimer Disease/metabolism
Amyloid beta-Peptides/antagonists & inhibitors
Amyloid beta-Peptides/metabolism
Animals
Cholinesterase Inhibitors/chemical synthesis
Cholinesterase Inhibitors/chemistry
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Electrophorus
Horses
Humans
Models, Molecular
Molecular Structure
Nicotinic Acids/chemistry
Structure-Activity Relationship
Tumor Cells, Cultured
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (5,6-dichloronicotinic acid); 0 (Acridines); 0 (Amyloid beta-Peptides); 0 (Cholinesterase Inhibitors); 0 (Nicotinic Acids); EC 3.1.1.7 (Acetylcholinesterase); EC 3.1.1.8 (Butyrylcholinesterase)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180123
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29482593
[Au] Autor:Cuéllar AC; Kjær LJ; Kirkeby C; Skovgard H; Nielsen SA; Stockmarr A; Andersson G; Lindstrom A; Chirico J; Lühken R; Steinke S; Kiel E; Gethmann J; Conraths FJ; Larska M; Hamnes I; Sviland S; Hopp P; Brugger K; Rubel F; Balenghien T; Garros C; Rakotoarivony I; Allène X; Lhoir J; Chavernac D; Delécolle JC; Mathieu B; Delécolle D; Setier-Rio ML; Venail R; Scheid B; Chueca MÁM; Barceló C; Lucientes J; Estrada R; Mathis A; Tack W; Bødker R
[Ad] Address:Division for Diagnostics and Scientific Advice, National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, Denmark. anacu@vet.dtu.dk.
[Ti] Title:Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in nine European countries.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):112, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV), African horse sickness virus and Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Outbreaks of both BTV and SBV have affected large parts of Europe. The spread of these diseases depends largely on vector distribution and abundance. The aim of this analysis was to identify and quantify major spatial patterns and temporal trends in the distribution and seasonal variation of observed Culicoides abundance in nine countries in Europe. METHODS: We gathered existing Culicoides data from Spain, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Poland. In total, 31,429 Culicoides trap collections were available from 904 ruminant farms across these countries between 2007 and 2013. RESULTS: The Obsoletus ensemble was distributed widely in Europe and accounted for 83% of all 8,842,998 Culicoides specimens in the dataset, with the highest mean monthly abundance recorded in France, Germany and southern Norway. The Pulicaris ensemble accounted for only 12% of the specimens and had a relatively southerly and easterly spatial distribution compared to the Obsoletus ensemble. Culicoides imicola Kieffer was only found in Spain and the southernmost part of France. There was a clear spatial trend in the accumulated annual abundance from southern to northern Europe, with the Obsoletus ensemble steadily increasing from 4000 per year in southern Europe to 500,000 in Scandinavia. The Pulicaris ensemble showed a very different pattern, with an increase in the accumulated annual abundance from 1600 in Spain, peaking at 41,000 in northern Germany and then decreasing again toward northern latitudes. For the two species ensembles and C. imicola, the season began between January and April, with later start dates and increasingly shorter vector seasons at more northerly latitudes. CONCLUSION: We present the first maps of seasonal Culicoides abundance in large parts of Europe covering a gradient from southern Spain to northern Scandinavia. The identified temporal trends and spatial patterns are useful for planning the allocation of resources for international prevention and surveillance programmes in the European Union.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2706-y

  8 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492841
[Au] Autor:Gialletti R; Marchegiani A; Valeriani T; Nannarone S; Beccati F; Fruganti A; Laus F
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo 4, 06126, Perugia, Italy.
[Ti] Title:A survey of ocular ultrasound abnormalities in horse: 145 cases.
[So] Source:J Ultrasound;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1876-7931
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe the association of clinical and ultrasonographic (US) findings in horses affected by visual impairments, to estimate the most frequent ultrasonographic alteration as well importance and limits of US as a part of ophthalmic evaluation in equine patients. METHODS: One-hundred-forty-five horses referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospitals of the University of Perugia and Camerino for ocular problems were submitted to ophthalmic examination and ocular ultrasound. The following group of abnormalities was established: corneal alteration, cataract, synechiae, iris prolapse, anterior chamber alterations, vitreous opacities, globe reduction, globe enlargement, retinal detachment, lens subluxation/luxation, lens rupture, intraocular masses, retrobulbar masses. Specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value and related 95% confidence interval were calculated. Kappa value was estimated for concordance evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 384 clinical alterations were observed during ophthalmological examination, while 357 were found by ultrasound investigation. A very good agreement was found for lens subluxation/luxation, intraocular masses, iris prolapse, globe enlargement, lens rupture, vitreous opacities and cataract. Moderate agreement was found for retinal detachment, anterior chamber alterations and synechiae. Corneal alteration and globe reduction resulted in a fair and poor agreement, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasonography affords the benefit of providing a complete cross-sectional view of the eyeball, facilitating the identification of ocular diseases in cases of loss of transparency of ocular media. It also represents an indispensable aid whenever anterior opacification precludes the use of ophthalmoscopic or biomicroscopic examination techniques.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40477-018-0284-7

  9 / 27142 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491237
[Au] Autor:Matsumura T; Mashiko R; Sato T; Itokawa K; Maekawa Y; Ogawa K; Isawa H; Yamamoto A; Mori S; Horita A; Ginnaga A; Miyatsu Y; Takahashi M; Taki H; Hifumi T; Sawabe K; Ato M
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases.
[Ti] Title:Venom and antivenom of redback spider (Latrodectus hasseltii) in Japan.
[So] Source:Jpn J Infect Dis;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1884-2836
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In September 1995 it was reported that the redback spider (Latrodectus hasseltii Thorell) had invaded Japan. To date 84 redback spider bite cases have been reported, and of these, seven employed the antivenom. In the past, antivenom have been imported from Australia, but because of restrictions on exportation thereof it was evident that nearly all of the antivenom present in Japan would expire during 2014. In 2014 a plan was proposed to experimentally manufacture and stockpile a horse antiserum for ourselves, employing redback spiders indigenous to Japan. A total of 11,403 female spiders were captured alive: 1,217 from the vicinity of Nishinomiya City, Hyogo prefecture, and 10,186 from Osaka prefecture. Of these, 10,007 females were dissected and the venom was extracted from the venom glands removed from each individual and subjected to crude purification to give 4 lots, of which the majority was α-latrotoxin. Among them, a large amount of single lot with an estimated protein content of 236 mg is subsequently scheduled to be used for immunizing horses. We also determined lethal toxicity of the venom (LD : 9.17 µg per mouse), and established the assay for the determination of anti-lethal titer of antivenom in mouse.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7883/yoken.JJID.2017.291

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[PMID]: 28460559
[Au] Autor:Mani RJ; Thachil AJ; Ramachandran A
[Ad] Address:Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (Mani, Ramachandran).
[Ti] Title:Discrimination of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;29(5):622-627, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Accurate and timely identification of infectious etiologies is of great significance in veterinary microbiology, especially for critical diseases such as strangles, a highly contagious disease of horses caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. equi. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platform for use in species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi isolates from horses and compared it with an automated biochemical system. We used 25 clinical isolates each of S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Using the MALDI-TOF MS platform, it was possible to correctly identify all 50 isolates to the species level. Unique mass peaks were identified in the bacterial peptide mass spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS, which can be used for accurate subspecies-level identification of S. equi. Mass peaks (mass/charge, m/ z) 6,751.9 ± 1.4 (mean ± standard deviation) and 5,958.1 ± 1.3 were found to be unique to S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus, respectively. The automated biochemical system correctly identified 47 of 50 of the isolates to the species level as S. equi, whereas at the subspecies level, 24 of 25 S. equi subsp. equi isolates and 22 of 25 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates were correctly identified. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used for accurate species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Horse Diseases/diagnosis
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization/veterinary
Streptococcal Infections/veterinary
Streptococcus equi/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Horse Diseases/microbiology
Horses
Species Specificity
Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology
Streptococcus equi/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638717702687


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