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[PMID]: 29272358
[Au] Autor:Grassi L; Nanni MG; Rodin G; Li M; Caruso R
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
[Ti] Title:The use of antidepressants in oncology: a review and practical tips for oncologists.
[So] Source:Ann Oncol;29(1):101-111, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1569-8041
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The use of psychotropic drugs, namely those with an antidepressant profile (ADs), is a mandatory part of an integrated treatment of psychiatric disorders among cancer patients. We aimed to synthetize the most relevant data emerging from published studies to provide tips about the use of ADs in oncology. Design: A search was made of the major databases over the last 30 years (Embase/Medline, PsycLIT, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library), including narrative reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analyses summarizing the results from observational studies and randomized clinical trials assessing effectiveness, safety profile, interactions, contraindications and use of ADs in oncology with regard to both psychiatric (depressive spectrum, stress-related, anxiety disorders) and cancer-related symptoms (e.g. pain, hot flashes and fatigue). Results: The weight of evidence supports the efficacy of ADs for more severe major depression in individuals with cancer and as an adjuvant treatment in cancer-related symptoms, although the methodological limitations of reported randomized controlled trials do not permit definite conclusions. Data also indicate that there should be caution in the use of ADs in cancer patients in terms of their safety profile and potential clinically significant interactions with other prescribed medications. Practical recommendations that have been made for the use of ADs in cancer patients, in the context of a multimodal approach to depression treatment, have been summarized here. Conclusions: ADs are a relatively safe and effective treatment for more severe major depression in cancer patients. However, more research is urgently needed regarding the efficacy of ADs in different cancer types and cancer settings, their interactions with anticancer agents and their additive benefit when integrated with psychosocial interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/annonc/mdx526

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[PMID]: 29230660
[Au] Autor:Nomura SJO; Hwang YT; Gomez SL; Fung TT; Yeh SL; Dash C; Allen L; Philips S; Hilakivi-Clarke L; Zheng YL; Wang JH
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Washington, D.C., 20057, USA.
[Ti] Title:Dietary intake of soy and cruciferous vegetables and treatment-related symptoms in Chinese-American and non-Hispanic White breast cancer survivors.
[So] Source:Breast Cancer Res Treat;168(2):467-479, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7217
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This project was undertaken to examine the association between dietary intake of soy or cruciferous vegetables and breast cancer treatment-related symptoms among Chinese-American (CA) and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) breast cancer survivors. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 192 CA and 173 NHW female breast cancer survivors (stages 0-III, diagnosed between 2006 and 2012) recruited from two California cancer registries, who had completed primary treatment. Patient-reported data on treatment-related symptoms and potential covariates were collected via telephone interviews. Dietary data were ascertained by mailed questionnaires. The outcomes evaluated were menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, vaginal discharge), joint problems, fatigue, hair thinning/loss, and memory problems. Associations between soy and cruciferous vegetables and symptoms were assessed using logistic regression. Analyses were further stratified by race/ethnicity and endocrine therapy usage (non-user, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors). RESULTS: Soy food and cruciferous vegetable intake ranged from no intake to 431 and 865 g/day, respectively, and was higher in CA survivors. Higher soy food intake was associated with lower odds of menopausal symptoms (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.25, 1.03), and fatigue (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.22, 0.84). However, when stratified by race/ethnicity, associations were statistically significant in NHW survivors only. Compared with low intake, higher cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with lower odds of experiencing menopausal symptoms (≥ 70.8 vs. < 33.0 g/day, OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.25, 0.97) in the overall population. CONCLUSIONS: In this population of breast cancer survivors, higher soy and cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with less treatment-related menopausal symptoms and fatigue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10549-017-4578-9

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[PMID]: 29508938
[Au] Autor:Lee TK; Poon DMC; Ng ACF; Ho T; Singh-Carlson S; Joffres M; Oshan G; Kohli J; Kwan W
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Abbotsford Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Cultural adaptation and validation of the Chinese version of the expanded prostate cancer index composite.
[So] Source:Asia Pac J Clin Oncol;14 Suppl 1:10-15, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1743-7563
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC) is a widely adopted instrument for the quality of life of patients with prostate cancer. We aimed to create a Chinese version of EPIC to further research in the Chinese-speaking population. METHODS: A prototype was created by forward-backward translations and revisions. During cultural adaptation, 15 participants were interviewed after they had completed the prototype. A few issues highlighted included confusion related to the question format, subject non-familiarity with the Chinese term for "hot flashes," and the use of the Chinese term for "breast" as a strictly female body part. A pilot version was created based on the cultural adaptation findings. Validation of the pilot version was performed by having 50 participants complete the Chinese EPIC and EORTC QLQ-c30 twice within a 4-week period. Test-retest reliability (Pearson's correlations and difference distribution) and internal consistency (Cronbach's α) were measured using SAS version 9.4. RESULTS: Test-retest reliability values for the urinary, bowel, sexual and hormone domains were 0.71, 0.51, 0.51 and 0.66, respectively; subscale test-retest reliability ranged between 0.29 and 0.82. Internal consistency for domains was good with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.76 to 0.78 for the initial test and 0.67 to 0.85 for the retest. The performance of this version of EPIC was comparable to the validated EORTC QLQ-C30. CONCLUSION: The EPIC questionnaire was successfully translated into Chinese and was culturally adapted. The resultant Chinese version has high reliability and validity and will be an important tool for research on quality of life in the Chinese population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ajco.12855

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[PMID]: 29193539
[Au] Autor:Xiao Y; Zhang S; Tong H; Shi S
[Ad] Address:Poultry Institute, Chinese Academy of Agriculture Science, 58 Cangjie Road, Yangzhou, 225125, Jiangsu, China.
[Ti] Title:Comprehensive evaluation of the role of soy and isoflavone supplementation in humans and animals over the past two decades.
[So] Source:Phytother Res;32(3):384-394, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1573
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Soy and soy-based foods are considered healthy, particularly in many Asia-Pacific countries, where soy products have long been consumed. Soy and soy-related products have been found to help prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer, such as breast and prostate cancer. These products can also have antioxidative effects that alleviate hot flashes during menopause and bone loss. These biological and therapeutic functions are primarily due to the isoflavones derived from soy, whose structure is similar to the structure of 17-ß-oestradiol. Despite the many health benefits for humans and animals, the application of isoflavones remains controversial because of their anti-oestrogenic properties. We focused on general information regarding isoflavones, as well as their structure, function, and application. We summarized evidence showing that dietary or supplemental isoflavones exert protective effects on the health of humans and animals. Based on the literature, we conclude that soy foods and isoflavones may be effective and safe; however, more high-quality trials are needed to fully substantiate their potential use.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/ptr.5966

  5 / 3905 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29504242
[Au] Autor:Harrington LB; Blondon M; Cushman M; Kaunitz AM; Allison MA; Wang L; Sullivan S; Woods NF; LaCroix AZ; Heckbert SR; McKnight B; Rossouw J; Smith NL
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
[Ti] Title:Vasomotor symptoms and the risk of incident venous thrombosis in postmenopausal women.
[So] Source:J Thromb Haemost;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7836
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vasomotor symptoms may be markers of changes in cardiovascular risk, but it is unknown whether these symptoms are associated with the risk of venous thrombosis (VT). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of vasomotor symptom presence and severity with incident VT risk among postmenopausal women, independent of potential explanatory variables. METHODS: This cohort study included participants of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Hormone Therapy Trials (n=24,508) and Observational Study (n=87,783), analyzed separately. At baseline, women reported whether hot flashes or night sweats were present and if so, their severity. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated VT risk associated with vasomotor symptom presence and severity, adjusted for potential explanatory variables: age, BMI, smoking status, race/ethnicity, and time-varying current hormone therapy use. RESULTS: At baseline, WHI Hormone Therapy Trial participants were 64 years of age and WHI Observational Study participants were 63 years of age, on average. In the WHI Hormone Therapy Trials over a median of 8.2 years of follow-up, 522 women experienced a VT event. In the WHI Observational Study, over 7.9 years of follow-up, 1,103 women experienced a VT event. In adjusted analyses, we found no evidence of an association between vasomotor symptom presence (HR =0.91 [95%CI: 0.75, 1.1] in WHI Hormone Therapy Trials; HR =1.1 [95%CI: 0.99, 1.3] in WHI Observational Study) or severity (HR for severe vs. mild=0.99 [95%CI: 0.53, 1.9] in WHI Hormone Therapy Trials; HR =1.3 [95%CI: 0.89, 2.0] in WHI Observational Study) and the risk of incident VT. CONCLUSIONS: Although vasomotor symptoms have been associated with the risk of other cardiovascular events in published studies, our findings do not suggest that vasomotor symptoms are a marker of VT risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jth.13993

  6 / 3905 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27779568
[Au] Autor:Santoro N; Allshouse A; Neal-Perry G; Pal L; Lobo RA; Naftolin F; Black DM; Brinton EA; Budoff MJ; Cedars MI; Dowling NM; Dunn M; Gleason CE; Hodis HN; Isaac B; Magnani M; Manson JE; Miller VM; Taylor HS; Wharton W; Wolff E; Zepeda V; Harman SM
[Ad] Address:1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology 2Department of Biostatistics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 3Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women's Health and Neurosciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 4Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 5Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 6Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 7Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 8Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research, Salt Lake City, UT 9Department of Cardiology, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor UCLA, Torrance, CA 10Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 11Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 12Kronos Longevity Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ 13Department of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 14Atherosclerosis Research Unit, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 15Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 16Departments of Surgery and Physiology & Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 17Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 18Department of Reproductive Biology and Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 19Department of Medicine, Endocrine Division, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ.
[Ti] Title:Longitudinal changes in menopausal symptoms comparing women randomized to low-dose oral conjugated estrogens or transdermal estradiol plus micronized progesterone versus placebo: the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study.
[So] Source:Menopause;24(3):238-246, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0374
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to compare the efficacy of two forms of menopausal hormone therapy in alleviating vasomotor symptoms, insomnia, and irritability in early postmenopausal women during 4 years. METHODS: A total of 727 women, aged 42 to 58, within 3 years of their final menstrual period, were randomized to receive oral conjugated estrogens (o-CEE) 0.45 mg (n = 230) or transdermal estradiol (t-E2) 50 µg (n = 225; both with micronized progesterone 200 mg for 12 d each mo), or placebos (PBOs; n = 275). Menopausal symptoms were recorded at screening and at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months postrandomization. Differences in proportions of women with symptoms at baseline and at each follow-up time point were compared by treatment arm using exact χ tests in an intent-to-treat analysis. Differences in treatment effect by race/ethnicity and body mass index were tested using generalized linear mixed effects modeling. RESULTS: Moderate to severe hot flashes (from 44% at baseline to 28.3% for PBO, 7.4% for t-E2, and 4.2% for o-CEE) and night sweats (from 35% at baseline to 19% for PBO, 5.3% for t-E2, and 4.7% for o-CEE) were reduced significantly by 6 months in women randomized to either active hormone compared with PBO (P < 0.001 for both symptoms), with no significant differences between the active treatment arms. Insomnia and irritability decreased from baseline to 6 months postrandomization in all groups. There was an intermittent reduction in insomnia in both active treatment arms versus PBO, with o-CEE being more effective than PBO at 36 and 48 months (P = 0.002 and 0.05) and t-E2 being more effective than PBO at 48 months (P = 0.004). Neither hormone treatment significantly affected irritability compared with PBO. Symptom relief for active treatment versus PBO was not significantly modified by body mass index or race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Recently postmenopausal women had similar and substantial reductions in hot flashes and night sweats with lower-than-conventional doses of oral or transdermal estrogen. These reductions were sustained during 4 years. Insomnia was intermittently reduced compared with PBO for both hormone regimens.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Estrogens/administration & dosage
Hot Flashes/drug therapy
Irritable Mood/drug effects
Progestins/administration & dosage
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Administration, Cutaneous
Administration, Oral
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases/etiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Estradiol/administration & dosage
Estrogen Replacement Therapy/methods
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP)/administration & dosage
Female
Hot Flashes/etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Postmenopause/drug effects
Progesterone/administration & dosage
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
Treatment Outcome
Vasomotor System/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Estrogens); 0 (Estrogens, Conjugated (USP)); 0 (Progestins); 4G7DS2Q64Y (Progesterone); 4TI98Z838E (Estradiol)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/GME.0000000000000756

  7 / 3905 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493565
[Au] Autor:Fernández M; Guerra P; Martín E; Martínez N; Álvarez-Diz JA; Grupo GIDSEEN.
[Ad] Address:Unidad de Tratamiento de Identidad de Género del Principado de Asturias (UTIGPA).
[Ti] Title:Atención sanitaria a adolescentes con disforia de género. [Health care for adolescents with gender dysphoria].
[So] Source:Rev Esp Salud Publica;92, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:2173-9110
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Dysphoria gender treatment in adolescents is recent. Studies of adolescents treated with analogs are reduced. To ensure the quality of care and safety of the child, follow-up studies are necessary. The aim of the present research was to describe the characteristics of the process of medical and psychological attention in adolescents with the DG in the Gender Identity Treatment Unit of Asturias in the period 2007-2015. METHODS: The sample included 20 minors attended in the Gender Identity Treatment Unit of Asturias in the period 2007-2015. The clinical history was made to collect the variables. It was made descriptive analysis. RESULTS: 10% of adolescents abandoned in the process of psychological counseling, 80% began to be valued by endocrinology and 10% continued exclusively in psychological consultations. Of the medical treated adolescents, 13.3% were treated with analogues and 86.7% received cross-hormonal treatment (THC) directly. The most prevalent secondary effects were dermatological problems (40%), followed by mastodynia without galactorrhea (26.7%) and hot flashes (20%). 20% performed gender confirmation surgeries. CONCLUSIONS: The profile of the adolescent treated in the unit of Asturias is a subject that begins hormonal treatment after psychological accompaniment and endocrinological evaluation. The minor has adverse effects after treatment. Once the hormonal treatment has been established, they do not abandon the process.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 3905 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390899
[Au] Autor:Thurston RC
[Ad] Address:a Departments of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Epidemiology , University of Pittsburgh , Pittsburgh , PA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Vasomotor symptoms: natural history, physiology, and links with cardiovascular health.
[So] Source:Climacteric;21(2):96-100, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1473-0804
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), or hot flushes and night sweats, are the classic symptom of menopause. Recent years have brought key advances in the knowledge about VMS. VMS last longer than previously thought, on average 7-10 years for frequent or moderate to severe VMS. Although VMS have long been understood to be important to women's quality of life, research has also linked VMS to indicators of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, such as an adverse CVD risk factor profile, greater subclinical CVD and, in emerging work, CVD events. Relations between VMS and CVD are not typically accounted for by CVD risk factors. In newer work, VMS-CVD risk relations are demonstrated with state-of-the-art subjective and objective measures of VMS. Some research indicates that VMS-CVD risk relations may be sensitive to the timing or duration of VMS. Thus, research collectively supports relations between VMS and CVD risk independent of known CVD risk factors. Next steps include identifying the mechanisms linking VMS and CVD risk indicators, understanding any timing effects, and clarifying the precise nature of relations between VMS and CVD risk. Clinical implications are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/13697137.2018.1430131

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[PMID]: 28463150
[Au] Autor:Gay HA; Sanda MG; Liu J; Wu N; Hamstra DA; Wei JT; Dunn RL; Klein EA; Sandler HM; Saigal CS; Litwin MS; Kuban DA; Hembroff L; Regan MM; Chang P; Michalski JM; Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: hiramgay@wustl.edu.
[Ti] Title:External Beam Radiation Therapy or Brachytherapy With or Without Short-course Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter, Prospective Study of Quality of Life.
[So] Source:Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys;98(2):304-317, 2017 06 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-355X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The long-term effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) with radiation therapy on participant-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been characterized in prospective multicenter studies. We evaluated HRQOL for 2 years among participants undergoing radiation therapy (RT) with or without NADT for newly diagnosed, early-stage prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed longitudinal cohort data from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium to ascertain the HRQOL trajectory of men receiving NADT with external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy. HRQOL was measured using the expanded prostate cancer index composite 26-item questionnaire at 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after the initiation of NADT. We used the χ or Fisher exact test to compare the shift in percentages between groups that did or did not receive NADT. Analyses were conducted at the 2-sided 5% significance level. RESULTS: For subjects receiving EBRT, questions regarding the ability to have an erection, ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, frequency of erections, ability to function sexually, and lack of energy were in a significantly worse dichotomized category for the patients receiving NADT. Comparing the baseline versus 24-month outcomes, 24%, 23%, and 30% of participants receiving EBRT plus NADT shifted to the worse dichotomized category for the ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually compared with 14%, 13%, and 16% in the EBRT group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with baseline, at 2 years, participants receiving NADT plus EBRT compared with EBRT alone had worse HRQOL, as measured by the ability to reach orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually. However, no difference was found in the ability to have an erection, frequency of erections, overall sexual function, hot flashes, breast tenderness/enlargement, depression, lack of energy, or change in body weight. The improved survival in intermediate- and high-risk patients receiving NADT and EBRT necessitates pretreatment counseling of the HRQOL effect of NADT and EBRT.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Androgen Antagonists/adverse effects
Brachytherapy/adverse effects
Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects
Orgasm
Penile Erection
Prostatic Neoplasms/therapy
Quality of Life
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Androgen Antagonists/therapeutic use
Body Weight/drug effects
Body Weight/radiation effects
Brachytherapy/methods
Brachytherapy/statistics & numerical data
Breast/drug effects
Breast/radiation effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects
Combined Modality Therapy/methods
Combined Modality Therapy/statistics & numerical data
Depression/etiology
Erectile Dysfunction/etiology
Fatigue/etiology
Hot Flashes/etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods
Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data
Orgasm/drug effects
Orgasm/radiation effects
Penile Erection/drug effects
Penile Erection/radiation effects
Prospective Studies
Prostate-Specific Antigen/blood
Prostatic Neoplasms/blood
Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Androgen Antagonists); EC 3.4.21.77 (Prostate-Specific Antigen)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 3905 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29485645
[Au] Autor:Abubakar MB; Gan SH
[Ad] Address:Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia 16150 Malaysia. And Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Dan Fodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria. murtalaabubakar704@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Correlation of Serum Estradiol and Duration of Anastrazole Therapy with Treatment Related Adverse Effects Among Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Women: A Cross-sectional Study.
[So] Source:Niger J Physiol Sci;32(2):219-225, 2017 Dec 30.
[Is] ISSN:0794-859X
[Cp] Country of publication:Nigeria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although anastrozole (Anas) plays a key role in the management of endocrine sensitive post-menopausal (PM) breast cancer (BC), there is much variability in its efficacy and tolerability. Anas-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (MS) and other adverse reactions, such as hot flashes (HF) and vaginal dryness/dyspareunia (VDD), are common and can affect the quality of life of BC patients, even sometimes leading to treatment withdrawal. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and demographic factors associated with these adverse events. This is a cross-sectional study in estrogen receptor (ER) positive PM women (n = 92) with stages I to III BC receiving Anas. Multivariate analyses were performed to investigate the factors associated with Anas-induced adverse effects such as MS, HF and VDD. A serum estradiol concentration was undetectable (< 36.7 pmol/L) in 68.1% of patients but was detectable within a normal range (>36.7-88.1 pmol/L) in the other 31.9% of patients, and this group was found to have a lower odds of having at least one adverse effect (AE) compared to those with undetectable levels [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.64, p = 0.013]. Women with grades II and III tumors and a family history of BC had a higher odds of AE (grade II: AOR 12.22, CI 1.48 to 100.80, p = 0.020; grade III: AOR 12.95, CI 1.25 to 134.33, p = 0.032) and VDD (AOR 5.99, CI 1.30 to 27.52, p = 0.021), respectively. Patients who received Anas treatment for more than one year had a higher odds of VDD (one to three years: AOR 34.57, CI 3.86, 309.50, p = 0.002; more than 3 years: AOR 27.90, CI 2.21 to 351.84, p = 0.010). Advanced age also lowered the odds of HF (AOR 0.90, CI 0.83 to 1.00, p = 0.049). In conclusion, patients' hormonal environments and durations of Anas treatment may play a role in developing Anas-induced adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process


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