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[PMID]: 29431314
[Au] Autor:Baktybaeva ZB; Suleymanov RA; Yamalov SM; Kulagin AA; Valeev TK; Rakhmatullin NR
[Ti] Title:[Evaluation of the content and migration of heavy metals in components of river ecosystems' of mining territories of the Republic of Bashkortostan].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(9):822-7, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:Exploration and development of mineral deposits in the Transurals of the Republic of Bashkortostan are accompanied by a comprehensive environmental impact. Ones of the most vulnerable elements of the landscape are the surface water bodies used for fishery purposes, recreation and household needs of the population. Extraction and processing of ores lead to the contamination of aquatic ecosystems by heavy metals (HM), which by passing into a pond, can actively be involved in the cycling of matter and migrate via food chains to the human under the consumption of fish products. Possessing by cumulative properties, HM can express mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic properties. The aim of research was the study of the impact of mining facilities on the content of the priority HM in the components of river ecosystems in the Transurals of the Republic of Bashkortostan and the development of a complex of preventive measures on the improvement of the human environment. There was studied the content of Zn, Cu and Cd in the water, bottom sediments and phytomass of Elodea canadensis Michx. The measurements of mass concentrations of metals were performed by stripping voltammetry with the use of the STA device. The results showed that for the cross-sections there is typical the following descending series of elements in the river components: Zn > Cu > Cd. In water samples there is observed the exceedance of standards for water bodies of potable, cultural and community water use and fishery basins. The concentration of zinc varies in the range of 0.016-5.24 mg/dm; copper - 0.0024-0.095 mg/dm; cadmium - 0.0001-0.019 mg/dm. In bottom sediments, in general, the content of metals in comparison with control plots is increased to the tenfold value. The meaning of mobile forms of zinc in the ground varies in the range of 0.81-9.62 mg/kg; copper - 0.12-18.69 mg/kg; cadmium - 0.00013-0.092 mg/kg. The zinc concentration in above-ground phytomass of Elodea canadensis compared to control increases by 2-3.5 times, copper - 4-8 times, cadmium - 2-7 times. Univariate analysis of variance confirmed the accuracy of the impact of the degree of contamination on the accumulation of metals by Elodea canadensis. The results testify to the potential danger to health of water bodies of the region's population.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ecological Parameter Monitoring
Fresh Water
Metals, Heavy
Rivers/chemistry
Water Pollution
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bashkiria/epidemiology
Ecological Parameter Monitoring/methods
Ecological Parameter Monitoring/statistics & numerical data
Fresh Water/analysis
Fresh Water/chemistry
Humans
Hydrocharitaceae/chemistry
Metals, Heavy/analysis
Metals, Heavy/chemistry
Mining/standards
Population Health/statistics & numerical data
Public Health/methods
Public Health/standards
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical/chemistry
Water Pollution/adverse effects
Water Pollution/analysis
Water Pollution/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29465915
[Au] Autor:Hernández Y; González K; Valdés-Iglesias O; Zarabozo A; Portal Y; Laguna A; Martínez-Daranas B; Rodríguez M; Gutiérrez R
[Ti] Title:Seasonal behavior of Thalassia testudinum (Hydrocharitaceae) metabolites.
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(4):1527-35, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum, commonly known as turtle grass, is a dominant seagrass that grows in the Caribbean Sea shelf associated to Syringodium filiforme. The hydroalcoholic extract of T. testudinum is rich in polyphenols; the most abundant metabolite in this extract is thalassiolin B, a glycosilated flavonoid with skin damage repairing properties, and antioxidant capacity among others. The present study aimed at generating information about the seasonal behavior of secondary metabolites, as well as to study the antioxidant capacity of the T. testudinum leaves extract, collected monthly during 2012 from the Northeast coastline of Havana, Cuba. For this study, spectrophotometric methods were used to determine the concentrations of polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, soluble carbohydrates and proteins, chlorophylls a and b, and antioxidant activity of the extracts. In general, results demonstrated seasonal variations of the analyzed parameters. Extracts prepared from the vegetal material collected in October and November showed the highest values of polyphenols (58.81 ± 1.53 and 52.39 ± 0.63 mg/g bs, respectivally) and flavonoids (44.12 ± 1.30 and 51.30 ± 0.67 mg/gdw, respectively). On the contrary, the lowest values of polyphenols were found in extracts of leaves collected in July and August (15.51 ± 0.84 and 13.86 ± 0.48 mg/g,respectively). In accordance with these results, the lower value of Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) was obtained to get a 50 % of maximal effect on free radical scavenging activity with the extracts prepared from leaves collected in October and November, and less significant IC50 was obtained from the extract prepared from leaves collected in August (5.63 mg/mL). A negative correlation (r= -0.694) was observed in this study between the content of polyphenols and the IC50 necessary to get the half of its antioxidant maximal effect. The high correspondence between the maximum values of polyphenols, flavonoids, carbohydrates and proteins in October and November, revealed a close relationship between these metabolites found in the extract of T. testudinum. Our hypothesis about the annual variation in the concentration of these metabolites was validated; and these results will support the correct harvesting of T. testudinum leaves for biotechnology and industrial purposes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 411 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451378
[Au] Autor:Arellano-Méndez LU; Bello-Pineda J; Aké-Castillo JA; Pérez-España H; Martínez-Cardenas L
[Ti] Title:Distribución espacial y estructura morfométrica de las praderas de Thalassia testudinum (Hydrocharitaceae) en dos arrecifes del Parque Nacional Sistema Arrecifal Veracruzano, México. [Spatial distribution and ecological structure of Thalassia testudinum (Hydrocharitaceae) in two reefs of Veracruz Reef System National Park, Mexico].
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(2):427-48, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Seagrasses in coastal environments have been threatened by increased human activities; these have negatively altered processes and environmental services, and have decreased grassland areas. The aim of this study was to generate knowledge of Thalassia testudinum distribution, state of the structure and fragmentation level in two reefs of the Veracruz Reef System National Park (PNSAV). Two different reefs were selected: Sacrificios in the North and near the coast, and Cabezo in the South and away from the coast. Shoot-specific and area-specific characteristics of submerged macrophytes meadows present were determined, and four morpho-functional groups were identified. Significant differences between plant coverage were tested through nonparametric ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test. A supervised classification of spatial high-resolution image verified with field data was performed (55 Sacrificios and 290 Cabezo). The fragmentation level was calculated using landscape metrics, class level and thematic maps were made based on four covers. The meadows were dominated by Thalassia testudinum; maximum densities were 208 shoot/m2 in Cabezo, and 176 shoot/m2 in Sacrificios. Cabezo presented grasses with short (9 cm) and thin leaves (0.55 cm) on average; while Sacrificios showed longer (23.5 cm) and thicker (1 cm) leaves. Sacrificios showed lower fragmentation degree than Cabezo; in both cases, the vegetation cover fragmentation corresponded to less than 50 %. Although Cabezo reef presents further fragmentation, which creates a large number of microenvironments, being recognized for its importance as recruitment area. This work serves as a baseline for the creation of an adequate management plan (formation of a core area of Cabezo). It is necessary to complement this work with new efforts for the recognition of seagrass prairies in all PNSAV reefs, as well as periodic monitoring and recognition of ecosystem services. .
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 411 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29101854
[Au] Autor:Gong L; Zhang S; Chen D; Liu K; Lu J
[Ad] Address:Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Integrated Regulation and Resource Development on Shallow Lakes, College of Environment, Hohai University, Nanjing, 210098, China.
[Ti] Title:Response of biofilms-leaves of two submerged macrophytes to high ammonium.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;192:152-160, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Submerged macrophytes can provide attached surface for biofilms (known as periphyton) growth. In the present study, the alterations in biofilms formation, and chemical compositions and physiological responses were investigated on leaves of Vallisneria asiatica and Hydrilla verticillata exposed to 0.1 mg L (control) or with 10 mg L NH -N for 13 days. Results from physiological and biochemical indices (content of H O , malondialdehyde, total chlorophyll and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase) showed that high ammonium caused oxidative damage to leaves of two species of plant. Multifractal analysis (based on scanning electron microscope images) showed that for the same plant, the values of width â–³α (â–³α = α -α ) of the f(α) and Δf (Δf = f(α )-f(α )) were smaller on leaves surface of two species of plant treated with 10 mg L NH -N for 13 days than their controls, suggesting high ammonium treatments reduced morphological heterogeneity of leaf surface and enhanced area of the colony-like biofilms. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that C, O, N and P were dominant elements on leaves surface of two species of plant and ammonium application increased the percentage of C but decreased that of O. High ammonium increased C1 (C-C or C-H) percentage but decreased C2 (C-O) and C3 (O-C-O or C=O) percentage on leaves surface of two species of plant, indicating that ammonium stress changed the surface chemical states and thus might reduce the capacity of leaves to adsorb nutrients from water column. Our results provided useful information to understand ammonium induced toxicity to submerged macrophytes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ammonium Compounds/metabolism
Hydrocharitaceae/physiology
Plant Leaves/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biofilms
Catalase/metabolism
Chlorophyll/metabolism
Hydrocharitaceae/enzymology
Hydrocharitaceae/growth & development
Malondialdehyde/metabolism
Peroxidases/metabolism
Plant Leaves/enzymology
Plant Leaves/growth & development
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Ammonium Compounds); 0 (Plant Proteins); 1406-65-1 (Chlorophyll); 4Y8F71G49Q (Malondialdehyde); EC 1.11.1.- (Peroxidases); EC 1.11.1.6 (Catalase); EC 1.15.1.1 (Superoxide Dismutase)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171105
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 411 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28704565
[Au] Autor:Deyanova D; Gullström M; Lyimo LD; Dahl M; Hamisi MI; Mtolera MSP; Björk M
[Ad] Address:Seagrass Ecology & Physiology Research Group, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Contribution of seagrass plants to CO2 capture in a tropical seagrass meadow under experimental disturbance.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0181386, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coastal vegetative habitats are known to be highly productive environments with a high ability to capture and store carbon. During disturbance this important function could be compromised as plant photosynthetic capacity, biomass, and/or growth are reduced. To evaluate effects of disturbance on CO2 capture in plants we performed a five-month manipulative experiment in a tropical seagrass (Thalassia hemprichii) meadow exposed to two intensity levels of shading and simulated grazing. We assessed CO2 capture potential (as net CO2 fixation) using areal productivity calculated from continuous measurements of diel photosynthetic rates, and estimates of plant morphology, biomass and productivity/respiration (P/R) ratios (from the literature). To better understand the plant capacity to coping with level of disturbance we also measured plant growth and resource allocation. We observed substantial reductions in seagrass areal productivity, biomass, and leaf area that together resulted in a negative daily carbon balance in the two shading treatments as well as in the high-intensity simulated grazing treatment. Additionally, based on the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and starch in the rhizomes, we found that the main reserve sources for plant growth were reduced in all treatments except for the low-intensity simulated grazing treatment. If permanent, these combined adverse effects will reduce the plants' resilience and capacity to recover after disturbance. This might in turn have long-lasting and devastating effects on important ecosystem functions, including the carbon sequestration capacity of the seagrass system.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aquatic Organisms
Carbon Dioxide/metabolism
Ecosystem
Grassland
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alismatales/growth & development
Biomass
Carbon Sequestration/physiology
Hydrocharitaceae/growth & development
Plant Development
Plant Shoots/growth & development
Research Design
Tanzania
Tropical Climate
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:142M471B3J (Carbon Dioxide)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0181386

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[PMID]: 28545148
[Au] Autor:Petersen G; Cuenca A; Zervas A; Ross GT; Graham SW; Barrett CF; Davis JI; Seberg O
[Ad] Address:Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Mitochondrial genome evolution in Alismatales: Size reduction and extensive loss of ribosomal protein genes.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177606, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The order Alismatales is a hotspot for evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes characterized by remarkable differences in genome size, substitution rates, RNA editing, retrotranscription, gene loss and intron loss. Here we have sequenced the complete mitogenomes of Zostera marina and Stratiotes aloides, which together with previously sequenced mitogenomes from Butomus and Spirodela, provide new evolutionary evidence of genome size reduction, gene loss and transfer to the nucleus. The Zostera mitogenome includes a large portion of DNA transferred from the plastome, yet it is the smallest known mitogenome from a non-parasitic plant. Using a broad sample of the Alismatales, the evolutionary history of ribosomal protein gene loss is analyzed. In Zostera almost all ribosomal protein genes are lost from the mitogenome, but only some can be found in the nucleus.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alismatales/genetics
Genome, Mitochondrial
Mitochondria/genetics
Ribosomal Proteins/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alismatales/classification
Biological Evolution
Chromosome Mapping
DNA, Plant/chemistry
DNA, Plant/metabolism
Hydrocharitaceae/genetics
Mitochondria/metabolism
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Zosteraceae/genetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (Ribosomal Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170526
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177606

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[PMID]: 28505209
[Au] Autor:Kim YK; Kim SH; Yi JM; Kang CK; Short F; Lee KS
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Genetic identification and evolutionary trends of the seagrass Halophila nipponica in temperate coastal waters of Korea.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177772, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although seagrass species in the genus Halophila are generally distributed in tropical or subtropical regions, H. nipponica has been reported to occur in temperate coastal waters of the northwestern Pacific. Because H. nipponica occurs only in the warm temperate areas influenced by the Kuroshio Current and shows a tropical seasonal growth pattern, such as severely restricted growth in low water temperatures, it was hypothesized that this temperate Halophila species diverged from tropical species in the relatively recent evolutionary past. We used a phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions to examine the genetic variability and evolutionary trend of H. nipponica. ITS sequences of H. nipponica from various locations in Korea and Japan were identical or showed very low sequence divergence (less than 3-base pair, bp, difference), confirming that H. nipponica from Japan and Korea are the same species. Halophila species in the section Halophila, which have simple phyllotaxy (a pair of petiolate leaves at the rhizome node), were separated into five well-supported clades by maximum parsimony analysis. H. nipponica grouped with H. okinawensis and H. gaudichaudii from the subtropical regions in the same clade, the latter two species having quite low ITS sequence divergence from H. nipponica (7-15-bp). H. nipponica in Clade I diverged 2.95 ± 1.08 million years ago from species in Clade II, which includes H. ovalis. According to geographical distribution and genetic similarity, H. nipponica appears to have diverged from a tropical species like H. ovalis and adapted to warm temperate environments. The results of divergence time estimates suggest that the temperate H. nipponica is an older species than the subtropical H. okinawensis and H. gaudichaudii and they may have different evolutionary histories.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Evolution, Molecular
Hydrocharitaceae/genetics
Seawater
Temperature
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: DNA, Ribosomal Spacer
Genes, Plant
Genetic Variation
Hydrocharitaceae/classification
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Ribosomal Spacer)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170920
[Lr] Last revision date:170920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170516
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177772

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[PMID]: 28333049
[Au] Autor:Yi ZJ; Yao J; Zhu MJ; Chen HL; Wang F; Liu X
[Ad] Address:School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road No. 30, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, China E-mail: yaojun@ustb.edu.cn; Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Mat
[Ti] Title:Uranium biosorption from aqueous solution by the submerged aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata.
[So] Source:Water Sci Technol;75(5-6):1332-1341, 2017 03.
[Is] ISSN:0273-1223
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The biosorption characteristics of U(VI) from aqueous solution onto a nonliving aquatic macrophyte, Hydrilla verticillata (dry powder), were investigated under various experimental conditions by using batch methods. Results showed that the adsorption reached equilibrium within 60 min and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. U(VI) adsorption was strongly pH dependent, and the optimum pH for U(VI) removal was 5.5. Isotherm adsorption data displayed good correlation with the Langmuir model, with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 171.52 mg/g. Thermodynamic studies suggested that U(VI) adsorption onto H. verticillata was an exothermic and spontaneous process in nature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the amino and hydroxyl groups on the algal surface played an important role in U(VI) adsorption. The mechanisms responsible for U(VI) adsorption could involve electrostatic attraction and ion exchange. In conclusion, H. verticillata biomass showed good potential as an adsorption material for the removal of uranium contaminants in aqueous solution.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hydrocharitaceae/metabolism
Uranium/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adsorption
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biomass
Hydrocharitaceae/ultrastructure
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Kinetics
Photoelectron Spectroscopy
Solutions
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Thermodynamics
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Solutions); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 4OC371KSTK (Uranium)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170324
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2166/wst.2016.592

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[PMID]: 28144862
[Au] Autor:Chen J; Hu X; Cao T; Zhang X; Xi Y; Wen X; Su H; de Silva W; Zhu T; Ni L; Xie P
[Ad] Address:Donghu Experimental Station of Lake Ecosystems, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 7 Donghu South Road, Wuhan, 430072,, China.
[Ti] Title:Root-foraging behavior ensures the integrated growth of Vallisneria natans in heterogeneous sediments.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;24(9):8108-8119, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of root foraging and the physiological response of Vallisnaria natans grown in heterogeneous sediments. V. natans was cultivated in two homogeneous and two heterogeneous sediments. The results suggested that V. natans grown in heterogeneous sediments presented a significantly higher root proportion in its total biomass, exhibited root foraging, and grew well, as indicated by a total biomass, ramet number, and plant height very close to those of plants grown in nutrient-rich clay sediment. Moreover, the more sensitive physiological response of the roots than the stems or the leaves to sediment nutrients suggested that root foraging occurred, and the approached values between the two heterogeneous sediments and the homogeneous clay sediment indicated that V. natans could satisfy its nutrient requirements via root foraging. The results may be useful in the recovery of macrophytes that remodel part (rather than all) of the substrate and can potentially improve habitats that are unsuitable for plant growth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hydrocharitaceae/growth & development
Plant Roots/growth & development
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomass
Geologic Sediments
Plant Leaves/growth & development
Plant Stems/growth & development
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 171104
[Lr] Last revision date:171104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-017-8473-z

  10 / 411 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28098343
[Au] Autor:Tsuji K; Asayama T; Shiraki N; Inoue S; Okuda E; Hayashi C; Nishida K; Hasegawa H; Harada E
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Environmental Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka-cho, Hikone, Shiga, 522-8533, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Mn accumulation in a submerged plant Egeria densa (Hydrocharitaceae) is mediated by epiphytic bacteria.
[So] Source:Plant Cell Environ;40(7):1163-1173, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many aquatic plants act as biosorbents, removing and recovering metals from the environment. To assess the biosorbent activity of Egeria densa, a submerged freshwater macrophyte, plants were collected monthly from a circular drainage area in Lake Biwa basin and the Mn concentrations of the plants were analysed. Mn concentrations in these plants were generally above those of terrestrial hyperaccumulators, and were markedly higher in spring and summer than in autumn. Mn concentrations were much lower in plants incubated in hydroponic medium at various pH levels with and without Mn supplementation than in field-collected plants. The precipitation of Mn oxides on the leaves was determined by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Leucoberbelin blue staining. Several strains of epiphytic bacteria were isolated from the field-collected E. densa plants, with many of these strains, including those of the genera Acidovorax, Comamonas, Pseudomonas and Rhizobium, found to have Mn-oxidizing activity. High Mn concentrations in E. densa were mediated by the production of biogenic Mn oxide in biofilms on leaf surfaces. These findings provide new insights into plant epidermal bacterial flora that affect metal accumulation in plants and suggest that these aquatic plants may have use in Mn phytomining.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170602
[Lr] Last revision date:170602
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/pce.12910


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