Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hydroxocobalamin [Words]
References found : 1006 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 101 go to page                         

  1 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29502317
[Au] Autor:Keddie S; Adams A; Kelso ARC; Turner B; Schmierer K; Gnanapavan S; Malaspina A; Giovannoni G; Basnett I; Noyce AJ
[Ad] Address:The Royal London Hospital, Emergency Care and Acute Medicine Clinical Academic Group, Neuroscience, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:No laughing matter: subacute degeneration of the spinal cord due to nitrous oxide inhalation.
[So] Source:J Neurol;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1459
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Whilst the dangers of 'legal highs' have been widely publicised in the media, very few cases of the neurological syndrome associated with the inhalation of nitrous oxide (N O) have been reported. Here we set out to raise awareness of subacute degeneration of the spinal cord arising from recreational N O use so that formal surveillance programs and public health interventions can be designed. METHODS: Case series documenting the clinical and investigational features of ten consecutive cases of subacute degeneration of the spinal cord presenting to a hospital with a tertiary neurosciences service in East London. RESULTS: Sensory disturbance in the lower (± upper) limbs was the commonest presenting feature, along with gait abnormalities and sensory ataxia. MRI imaging of the spine showed the characteristic features of dorsal column hyperintensity on T weighted sequences. Serum B levels may be normal because subacute degeneration of the spinal cord in this situation is triggered by functional rather than absolute B deficiency. DISCUSSION: A high index of suspicion is required to prompt appropriate investigation, make the diagnosis and commence treatment early. This is the largest reported series of patients with subacute degeneration of the spinal cord induced by recreational use of N O. However, the number of patients admitted to hospital likely represents the 'tip of the iceberg', with many less severe presentations remaining undetected. After raising awareness, attention should focus on measuring the extent of the problem, the groups affected, and devising ways to prevent potentially long-term neurological damage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00415-018-8801-3

  2 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29489307
[Au] Autor:Otterness K; Ahn C; Nusbaum J; Gupta N
[Ad] Address:Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.
[Ti] Title:Emergency department management of smoke inhalation injury in adults [digest].
[So] Source:Emerg Med Pract;20(3 Suppl Points & Pearls):1-2, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1559-3908
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Smoke inhalation injury portends increased morbidity and mortality in fire-exposed patients. Upper airway thermal burns, inflammation from lower airway irritants, and systemic effects of carbon monoxide and cyanide can contribute to injury. A standardized diagnostic protocol for inhalation injury is lacking, and management remains mostly supportive. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for concomitant traumatic injuries. Diagnosis is mostly clinical, aided by bronchoscopy and other supplementary tests. Treatment includes airway and respiratory support, lung protective ventilation, 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning, and hydroxocobalamin for cyanide toxicity. Due to its progressive nature, many patients with smoke inhalation injury warrant close monitoring for development of airway compromise. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29489306
[Au] Autor:Otterness K; Ahn C
[Ad] Address:Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.
[Ti] Title:Emergency department management of smoke inhalation injury in adults.
[So] Source:Emerg Med Pract;20(3):1-24, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1559-3908
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Smoke inhalation injury portends increased morbidity and mortality in fire-exposed patients. Upper airway thermal burns, inflammation from lower airway irritants, and systemic effects of carbon monoxide and cyanide can contribute to injury. A standardized diagnostic protocol for inhalation injury is lacking, and management remains mostly supportive. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for concomitant traumatic injuries. Diagnosis is mostly clinical, aided by bronchoscopy and other supplementary tests. Treatment includes airway and respiratory support, lung protective ventilation, 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning, and hydroxocobalamin for cyanide toxicity. Due to its progressive nature, many patients with smoke inhalation injury warrant close monitoring for development of airway compromise.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29205285
[Au] Autor:Du C; Martin R; Huang Y; Borwankar A; Tan Z; West J; Singh N; Borys M; Ghose S; Ludwig R; Tao L; Li ZJ
[Ad] Address:Process Development, Bristle-Myers Squibb, Devens, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin B association with mAbs: Mechanism and potential mitigation strategies.
[So] Source:Biotechnol Bioeng;115(4):900-909, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0290
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Process control for manufacturing biologics is critical for ensuring product quality, safety, and lot to lot consistency of therapeutic proteins. In this study, we investigated the root cause of the pink coloration observed for various in-process pools and drug substances in the antibody manufacturing process. Vitamin B is covalently bound to mAbs via a cobalt-sulfur coordinate bond via the cysteine residues. The vitamin B was identified to attach to an IgG4 molecule at cysteine residues on light chain (Cys-214), and heavy chain (Cys-134, Cys-321, Cys-367, and Cys-425). Prior to attachment to mAbs, the vitamin B needs to be in its active form of hydroxocobalamin. During culture media preparation, storage and cell culture processing, cyanocobalamin, the chemical form of vitamin B added to media, is converted to hydroxocobalamin by white fluorescence light (about 50% degradation in 11-14 days at room temperature and with room light intensity about 500-1,000 lux) and by short-wavelength visible light (400-550 nm). However, cyanocobalamin is stable under red light (wavelength >600 nm) exposure and does not convert to hydroxocobalamin. Our findings suggests that the intensity of pink color depends on concentrations of both free sulfhydryl groups on reduced mAb and hydroxocobalamin, the active form of vitamin B . Both reactants are necessary and neither one of them is sufficient to generate pink color, therefore process control strategy can consider limiting either one or both factors. A process control strategy to install red light (wavelength >600 nm) in culture media preparation, storage and culture processing areas is proposed to provide safe light for biologics and to prevent light-induced color variations in final products.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/bit.26511

  5 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29461292
[Au] Autor:Foncerrada G; Culnan DM; Capek KD; González-Trejo S; Cambiaso-Daniel J; Woodson LC; Herndon DN; Finnerty CC; Lee JO
[Ti] Title:Inhalation Injury in the Burned Patient.
[So] Source:Ann Plast Surg;80(3 Suppl 2):S98-S105, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inhalation injury causes a heterogeneous cascade of insults that increase morbidity and mortality among the burn population. Despite major advancements in burn care for the past several decades, there remains a significant burden of disease attributable to inhalation injury. For this reason, effort has been devoted to finding new therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes for patients who sustain inhalation injuries.The three major injury classes are the following: supraglottic, subglottic, and systemic. Treatment options for these three subtypes differ based on the pathophysiologic changes that each one elicits.Currently, no consensus exists for diagnosis or grading of the injury, and there are large variations in treatment worldwide, ranging from observation and conservative management to advanced therapies with nebulization of different pharmacologic agents.The main pathophysiologic change after a subglottic inhalation injury is an increase in the bronchial blood flow. An induced mucosal hyperemia leads to edema, increases mucus secretion and plasma transudation into the airways, disables the mucociliary escalator, and inactivates hypoxic vasocontriction. Collectively, these insults potentiate airway obstruction with casts formed from epithelial debris, fibrin clots, and inspissated mucus, resulting in impaired ventilation. Prompt bronchoscopic diagnosis and multimodal treatment improve outcomes. Despite the lack of globally accepted standard treatments, data exist to support the use of bronchoscopy and suctioning to remove debris, nebulized heparin for fibrin casts, nebulized N-acetylcysteine for mucus casts, and bronchodilators.Systemic effects of inhalation injury occur both indirectly from hypoxia or hypercapnia resulting from loss of pulmonary function and systemic effects of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as directly from metabolic poisons such as carbon monoxide and cyanide. Both present with nonspecific clinical symptoms including cardiovascular collapse. Carbon monoxide intoxication should be treated with oxygen and cyanide with hydroxocobalamin.Inhalation injury remains a great challenge for clinicians and an area of opportunity for scientists. Management of this concomitant injury lags behind other aspects of burn care. More clinical research is required to improve the outcome of inhalation injury.The goal of this review is to comprehensively summarize the diagnoses, treatment options, and current research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/SAP.0000000000001377

  6 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29461288
[Au] Autor:Culnan DM; Craft-Coffman B; Bitz GH; Capek KD; Tu Y; Lineaweaver WC; Kuhlmann-Capek MJ
[Ti] Title:Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide Poisoning in the Burned Pregnant Patient: An Indication for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.
[So] Source:Ann Plast Surg;80(3 Suppl 2):S106-S112, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carbon monoxide (CO) is a small molecule poison released as a product of incomplete combustion. Carbon monoxide binds hemoglobin, reducing oxygen delivery. This effect is exacerbated in the burned pregnant patient by fetal hemoglobin that binds CO 2.5- to 3-fold stronger than maternal hemoglobin. With no signature clinical symptom, diagnosis depends on patient injury history, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels, and alterations in mental status. The standard of care for treatment of CO intoxication is 100% normobaric oxygen, which decreases the half-life of CO in the bloodstream from 5 hours to 1 hour. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is a useful adjunct to rapidly reduce the half-life of CO to 20 minutes and the incidence of delayed neurologic sequelae. Because of the slow disassociation of CO from hemoglobin in the fetus, there is a far stronger indication for HBO2 in the burned pregnant patient than in other burn patient populations.Cyanide intoxication is often a comorbid disease with CO in inhalation injury from an enclosed fire, but may be the predominant toxin. It acts synergistically with CO to effectively lower the lethal doses of both cyanide and CO. Diagnosis is best made in the presence of high lactate levels, carboxyhemoglobin concentrations greater than 10%, injury history of smoke inhalation from an enclosed fire, and alterations in consciousness. While treatment with hydroxocobalamin is the standard of care and has the effect of reducing concomitant CO toxicity, data indicate cyanide may also be displaced by HBO2.Carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning presents potential complications impacting care. This review addresses the mechanism of action, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of CO and cyanide poisonings in the burned pregnant patient and the use of HBO2 therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/SAP.0000000000001351

  7 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29423881
[Au] Autor:Kertai MD; Shaw AD
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211, 21st Avenue South, Medical Arts Building, Room 722, Nashville, TN, 37212, USA.
[Ti] Title:L'étrange conte de la médecine de précision périopératoire : une histoire de l'hydroxocobalamine et de la vasoplégie associée à la chirurgie cardiaque. The curious tale of perioperative precision medicine: a story of hydroxocobalamin and cardiac surgery-associated vasoplegia.
[So] Source:Can J Anaesth;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1496-8975
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12630-018-1083-5

  8 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29417853
[Au] Autor:Parker-Cote JL; Rizer J; Vakkalanka JP; Rege SV; Holstege CP
[Ad] Address:a Division of Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine , University of Virginia School of Medicine , Charlottesville , VA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Challenges in the diagnosis of acute cyanide poisoning.
[So] Source:Clin Toxicol (Phila);:1-9, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1556-9519
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to identify isolated acute cyanide poison cases and to identify reported signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Reviews, and Web of Science case reports and series using a number of MeSH descriptors pertaining to cyanide, toxicity, and poisonings. We excluded studies on plants, laboratory analyses, smoke inhalation poisonings, animals as well as non-English language articles and those in which data were not available. Data extracted included demographics, exposure characteristics, acute signs/symptoms, and medical management and outcome. RESULTS: From the initial 2976 articles retrieved, 65 articles (52 case reports, 13 case series) met inclusion criteria and described 102 patients. Most patients were unresponsive (78%), hypotensive (54%), or had respiratory failure (73%); other signs and symptoms included cardiac arrest (20%), seizures (20%), cyanosis (15%), cherry red skin (11%), and had an odor present (15%). Medical management included cyanide antidote kit (20%), sodium thiosulfate (40%), and hydroxocobalamin (29%). The majority of cases (66%) required intubation with mechanical ventilation and a substantial number (39%) developed refractory hypotension requiring vasopressor support. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to general reviews published on cyanide toxicity, reports of cherry red skin and bitter almond odor were rare among published cyanide cases. Consistent with other studies, metabolic acidosis with significant lactic acidosis were the laboratory values consistently associated with cyanide toxicity. Healthcare providers may overlook cyanide toxicity in the differential diagnosis, if certain expected characteristics, such as the odor of almonds or a cherry red color of the skin are absent on physical examination.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15563650.2018.1435886

  9 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29395761
[Au] Autor:Kaita Y; Tarui T; Shoji T; Miyauchi H; Yamaguchi Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Trauma and Critical Care Medicine, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Japan. Electronic address: pikoharyuha@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Cyanide poisoning is a possible cause of cardiac arrest among fire victims, and empiric antidote treatment may improve outcomes.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning are important causes of death due to fire. Carbon monoxide is more regularly assessed than cyanide at the site of burn or smoke inhalation treatment due to its ease in assessment and simplicity to treat. Although several forensic studies have demonstrated the significance of cyanide poisoning in fire victims using blood cyanide levels, the association between the cause of cardiac arrest and the concentration of cyanide among fire victims has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest in fire victims and to assess the necessity of early empiric treatment for cyanide poisoning. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of fire victims with cardiac arrest at the scene who were transported to a trauma and critical care center, Kyorin University Hospital, from January 2014 to June 2017. Patients whose concentration of cyanide was measured were included. RESULTS: Five patients were included in the study; all died despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Three of these victims were later found to have lethal cyanide levels (>3 µg/ml). Two of the patients had non-lethal carboxyhemoglobin levels under 50% and might have been saved if hydroxocobalamin had been administered during resuscitation. CONCLUSION: According to our results, cyanide-induced cardiac arrest may be more frequently present among fire victims than previously believed, and early empiric treatment with hydroxocobalamin may improve outcomes for these victims in cases where cardiac arrest is of short duration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1006 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29243660
[Au] Autor:Houzé P; Laforge M; Baud FJ
[Ad] Address:Service de biochimie générale, Hôpital universitaire Necker-Enfants malades, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France, Unité de technologies chimiques et biologiques pour la santé (UTCBS), CNRS UMR8258 - U1022, Faculté de pharmacie Paris-Descartes, Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France.
[Ti] Title:Lactate blood measurement in acute cyanide poisoning: effect of preanalytical delay and hydroxocobalamin uses as treatment.
[So] Source:Ann Biol Clin (Paris);76(1):96-103, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6112
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We quantify the impact of several variables including site of blood draw, delay in measurement, and use of the cyanide antidote hydroxocobalamin on detection of both normal (<2 mmol/L) and elevated (>6 mmol/L) human plasma lactate. An in vivo study assessed effects of venous or arterial origin of blood samples. Two in vitro studies assessed the effect of a 2 h delay in measuring plasma lactate concentrations, as well as the interference of low (100 µmol/L) and high (300 µmmol/L) plasma hydroxocobalamin concentrations on detecting normal and elevated levels of lactate. A relative change of 20% in the measured lactate concentration was considered clinically significant. There was no clinically relevant effect of the site of blood draw on lactate measurements. Plasma lactate concentrations were artificially increased by a delay of 2 h between blood draw and sample measurement. Under conditions where plasma lactate levels were in a normal range, the dose equivalent to 300 µmol/L hydroxocobalamin concentration caused an artificial increase in lactate measurements that could possibly be misinterpreted clinically as an elevation. Under conditions where plasma lactate levels were elevated, as would occur in cases of acute cyanide poisoning, neither the low nor high concentration of hydroxocobalamin caused a clinically relevant change in lactate measurements. Clinicians should be cautious in interpreting lactate concentrations if there has been a significant delay between blood draw and laboratory analysis, or when blood was collected shortly after the completion of hydroxocobalamin administration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1684/abc.2017.1310


page 1 of 101 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information