Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Hymenolepiasis [Words]
References found : 1063 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29390318
[Au] Autor:Hench J; Cathomas G; Dettmer MS
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathology, Cantonal Hospital Baselland, Liestal.
[Ti] Title:Hymenolepis nana: A case report of a perfect IBD camouflage warrior.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9146, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: There is evidence that parasitic helminths can ameliorate colitis in animal models and humans. Although infections with Hymenolepis sp. are clinically benign, the immunomodulatory interactions between host and parasite are largely unknown. PATIENT CONCERNS: In this study we examined the intestinal mucosa of an adult asymptomatic patient harboring adult and larval dwarf tapeworms (Hymenolepis nana) who underwent surgery for an unrelated reason. INTERVENTIONS: Routine histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterize the host's response to the parasite. Parasitic DNA was sequenced to identify the tapeworm species. DIAGNOSES: Morphological and immunohistochemical studies showed a nearly complete absence of an anti-parasite host immune response. The outer surface of the parasite also showed prominent cross-reactivity with various tested leukocyte antigens. Our findings closely resemble experimentally obtained data from the H. diminuta-infected rat at the state of persistent colonization. OUTCOMES: Cross-reactivity of parasite-borne molecules with anti-human-leukocyte antibodies indicates a potential functional role in active modulation of the host's immune response. LESSIONS: We believe that better understanding of the host-cestode interaction will certainly extend our knowledge on auto-aggressive disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and might provide potential treatment options.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hymenolepiasis/diagnosis
Hymenolepis nana
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/parasitology
Meckel Diverticulum/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Appendicitis/surgery
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidental Findings
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009146

  2 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386158
[Au] Autor:Khan W; Khan J; Rahman A; Ullah H; Salim M; Iqbal M; Khan I; Salman M; Munir B
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Albendazole in the treatment of Hymenolepiasis in school children.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;31(1(Suppl.)):305-309, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hymenolepiasis is a helminthic and occasionally fatal disease of human imposing heavy economic losses to human society. Present study was aimed to diagnose the school children for the prevalence and control of Hymenolepiasis. A school based cross-sectional analysis of stool samples collected from 188 children aged 06-15 years was carried out (February to June 2016). Two stool samples were collected from each student before diagnosing and after treatment. The samples were fixed in 10% formalin and observed under the light microscope using the methods of direct smear in Lugol's solution, normal saline and flotation techniques. On the basis of drugs accessibility all the H. nana infected children were divided in to 2- groups. Children in group A were treated with albendazole (bendazol) 400mg once orally, group B was treated with albendazole (zentel) 200mg orally. Eggs per gram of faeces were counted in each group before and after treatment. Of the 188 children, current study reveals only 6.08% (n=18/296) infection with H.nana and 10.5% (n=16/151) were diagnosed with co infections. The % efficacy of albendazole (Zentel) and albendazole (bendazol) against Hymenolepis nana infection was reported as 83% and 75% respectively. Present study was concluded that albendazole (zentel) is the drug of choice for the treatment of hymenolepiasis in children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29160912
[Au] Autor:Garcia HH; Castillo Y; Gonzales I; Bustos JA; Saavedra H; Jacob L; Del Brutto OH; Wilkins PP; Gonzalez AE; Gilman RH; Cysticercosis Working Group in Peru.
[Ad] Address:Cysticercosis Unit, Department of Transmissible Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurologicas, Lima, Peru.
[Ti] Title:Low sensitivity and frequent cross-reactions in commercially available antibody-detection ELISA assays for Taenia solium cysticercosis.
[So] Source:Trop Med Int Health;, 2017 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of two commercially available ELISA kits, Novalisa and Ridascreen , for the detection of antibodies to Taenia solium, compared to serological diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC) by LLGP-EITB (electro immunotransfer blot assay using lentil-lectin purified glycoprotein antigens). METHODS: Archive serum samples from patients with viable NCC (n=45) or resolved, calcified NCC (n=45), as well as sera from patients with other cestode parasites (hymenolepiasis, n=45, and cystic hydatid disease, n=45), were evaluated for cysticercosis antibody detection using two ELISA kits, Novalisa and Ridascreen . All NCC samples had previously tested positive and all samples from heterologous infections were negative on LLGP-EITB for cysticercosis. Positive rates were calculated by kit and sample group and compared between the two kits. RESULTS: Compared to LLGP-EITB, the sensitivity of both ELISA assays to detect specific antibodies in patients with viable NCC was low (44.4% and 22.2%), and for calcified NCC it was only 6.7% and 4.5%. Sera from patients with cystic hydatid disease were highly cross-reactive in both ELISA assays (38/45, 84.4%; and 25/45, 55.6%). Sera from patients with hymenolepiasis cross-reacted in five cases in one of the assays (11.1%), and in only one sample with the second (2.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The performance of Novalisa and Ridascreen was poor. Antibody ELISA detection cannot not be recommended for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tmi.13010

  4 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28829724
[Au] Autor:Vilchez Barreto PM; Gamboa R; Santivañez S; O'Neal SE; Muro C; Lescano AG; Moyano LM; Gonzálvez G; García HH; For The Cysticercosis Working Group In Perú Cwgp
[Ad] Address:Centro de Salud Global Tumbes, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence, Age Profile, and Associated Risk Factors for Infection in a Large Population-Based Study in Northern Peru.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;97(2):583-586, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:, the dwarf tapeworm, is a common intestinal infection of children worldwide. We evaluated infection and risk factor data that were previously collected from 14,761 children aged 2-15 years during a large-scale program in northern Peru. We found that 1,124 of 14,761 children (7.61%) had infection, a likely underestimate given that only a single stool sample was examined by microscopy for diagnosis. The strongest association with infection was lack of adequate water (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-2.48) and sanitation infrastructure in the house (aPR 1.94, 95% CI 1.64-2.29). One quarter of those tested did not have a bathroom or latrine at home, which doubled their likelihood of infection. Similarly, one quarter did not have piped public water to the house, which also increased the likelihood of infection. Continued efforts to improve access to basic water and sanitation services will likely reduce the burden of infection in children for this and other intestinal infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Feces/parasitology
Hymenolepiasis/epidemiology
Hymenolepis nana/isolation & purification
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Age Factors
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Peru
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Sanitation
Toilet Facilities
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170911
[Lr] Last revision date:170911
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170823
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.16-0939

  5 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28719963
[Au] Autor:Yang D; Zhao W; Zhang Y; Liu A
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, China.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of and from Brown Rats ( ) in Heilongjiang Province, China.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(3):351-355, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:and are globally widespread zoonotic cestodes. Rodents are the main reservoir host of these cestodes. Brown rats ( ) are the best known and most common rats, and usually live wherever humans live, especially in less than desirable hygiene conditions. Due to the little information of the 2 hymenolepidid species in brown rats in China, the aim of this study was to understand the prevalence and genetic characterization of and in brown rats in Heilongjiang Province, China. Total 114 fecal samples were collected from brown rats in Heilongjiang Province. All the samples were subjected to morphological examinations by microscopy and genetic analysis by PCR amplification of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 ( ) gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene. In total, 6.1% (7/114) and 14.9% (17/114) of samples were positive for and , respectively. Among them, 7 and 3 isolates were successfully amplified and sequenced at the and loci, respectively. No nucleotide variations were found among isolates at either of the 2 loci. Seventeen isolates produced 2 different sequences while 7 sequences obtained were identical to each other. The present results of and infections in brown rats implied the risk of zoonotic transmission of hymenolepiasis in China. These molecular data will be helpful to deeply study intra-specific variations within cestodes in the future.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170726
[Lr] Last revision date:170726
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.3.351

  6 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28719332
[Au] Autor:Ahmad AF; Ngui R; Ong J; Sarip F; Ismail WHW; Omar H; Nor ZM; Amir A; Lim YAL; Mahmud R
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Case Report: A Symptomatic Case of Infection in an Urban-Dwelling Adult in Malaysia.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;97(1):163-165, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A case of infection in a 43-year-old Malaysian male with persistent abdominal colicky pain is reported. Endoscopy revealed whitish worms in the lumen of the small intestine, which were identified as after microscopy. Patient was successfully treated with a single dose of praziquantel (25 mg/kg).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hymenolepiasis/diagnosis
Hymenolepis diminuta/isolation & purification
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Cities
Humans
Hymenolepiasis/epidemiology
Hymenolepiasis/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Malaysia/epidemiology
Male
Urban Population
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170731
[Lr] Last revision date:170731
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170719
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0877

  7 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28689507
[Au] Autor:Panti-May JA; DE Andrade RRC; Gurubel-González Y; Palomo-Arjona E; Sodá-Tamayo L; Meza-Sulú J; Ramírez-Sierra M; Dumonteil E; Vidal-Martínez VM; Machaín-Williams C; DE Oliveira D; Reis MG; Torres-Castro MA; Robles MR; Hernández-Betancourt SF; Costa F
[Ad] Address:Doctorado en Ciencias Agropecuarias,Campus de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias,Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán,Merida,Mexico.
[Ti] Title:A survey of zoonotic pathogens carried by house mouse and black rat populations in Yucatan, Mexico.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;145(11):2287-2295, 2017 08.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The house mouse (Mus musculus) and the black rat (Rattus rattus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens, several of which cause neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Studies of the prevalence of these NTD-causing zoonotic pathogens, in house mice and black rats from tropical residential areas are scarce. Three hundred and two house mice and 161 black rats were trapped in 2013 from two urban neighbourhoods and a rural village in Yucatan, Mexico, and subsequently tested for Trypanosoma cruzi, Hymenolepis diminuta and Leptospira interrogans. Using the polymerase chain reaction we detected T. cruzi DNA in the hearts of 4·9% (8/165) and 6·2% (7/113) of house mice and black rats, respectively. We applied the sedimentation technique to detect eggs of H. diminuta in 0·5% (1/182) and 14·2% (15/106) of house mice and black rats, respectively. Through the immunofluorescent imprint method, L. interrogans was identified in 0·9% (1/106) of rat kidney impressions. Our results suggest that the black rat could be an important reservoir for T. cruzi and H. diminuta in the studied sites. Further studies examining seasonal and geographical patterns could increase our knowledge on the epidemiology of these pathogens in Mexico and the risk to public health posed by rodents.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chagas Disease/veterinary
Hymenolepiasis/veterinary
Leptospirosis/veterinary
Mice
Rats
Rodent Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Chagas Disease/epidemiology
Chagas Disease/parasitology
Disease Reservoirs/microbiology
Disease Reservoirs/parasitology
Environment
Hymenolepiasis/epidemiology
Hymenolepiasis/parasitology
Hymenolepis diminuta/isolation & purification
Leptospira interrogans/isolation & purification
Leptospirosis/epidemiology
Leptospirosis/microbiology
Mexico/epidemiology
Prevalence
Rodent Diseases/microbiology
Rodent Diseases/parasitology
Rodentia
Trypanosoma cruzi/isolation & purification
Zoonoses/epidemiology
Zoonoses/microbiology
Zoonoses/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171125
[Lr] Last revision date:171125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170711
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268817001352

  8 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28646696
[Au] Autor:Pipiková J; Papajová I; Soltys J; Schusterová I
[Ad] Address:Institute of Parasitology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice, Slovak Republic.
[Ti] Title:Occurrence of the most common helminth infections among children in the Eastern Slovak Republic.
[So] Source:Public Health;150:71-76, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5616
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Ascariasis, trichuriasis and hymenolepiasis occur primarily within poor communities with low hygiene standards. This study examined the occurrence of intestinal helminth infections among children living in two counties (Kosice and Presov) in the Eastern Slovak Republic. STUDY DESIGN: Four hundred and twenty-six children were divided into groups according to ethnicity (non-Roma and Roma), age, sex, urban/rural residency and county of residence. METHODS: Stool samples collected from participants were processed by formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation and examined microscopically. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of infection was 16.90% and the most prevalent species was Ascaris lumbricoides (14.32%). This was followed by Trichuris trichiura (3.76%), Hymenolepis nana (0.94%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (0.23%). The odds ratio for infection was 52 times higher among Roma children compared with non-Roma children. Among Roma children, the lowest prevalence of infection was reported in adolescents aged ≥16 years. No significant differences in the prevalence of helminths were found between different sexes, or between hospitalized and non-hospitalized participants. Roma children living in urban areas had a 3.36 higher probability of infection than those living in rural areas. Among Roma children, helminth ova were found in 31.76% of the specimens from Kosice County and 19.69% of the specimens from Presov County. Among non-Roma children, there was only one positive finding in Presov County, and no cases in Kosice County. CONCLUSIONS: Important risk factors associated with helminth infections are ethnicity, county of residence and urban/rural residency. Ascariasis, trichuriasis and hymenolepiasis still occur in children with low hygiene standards, and this needs to be addressed by local authorities.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Helminthiasis/epidemiology
Helminthiasis/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Feces/parasitology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Slovakia/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170625
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28605969
[Au] Autor:Dovc A; Greguric Gracner G; Tomazic I; Vlahovic K; Pavlak M; Lindtner Knific R; Kralj K; Stvarnik M; Vergles Rataj A
[Ad] Address:Institute for Health Care of Poultry, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana , Ljubljana , Slovenia.
[Ti] Title:Control of Hymenolepis nana infection as a measure to improve mouse colony welfare.
[So] Source:Acta Vet Hung;65(2):208-220, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:0236-6290
[Cp] Country of publication:Hungary
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:After cannibalism had appeared in the reproductive units of a white mouse colony, treatment against confirmed Hymenolepis nana, a tapeworm with zoonotic potential, was performed on 67 mice in the reproductive and nursery units. Faecal droppings were evaluated by flotation and sedimentation methods. The sedimentation method revealed a higher number of positive results before, during and after the treatment, but the flotation method yielded some additional positive cases. In the reproductive unit, H. nana eggs were confirmed in 50% of the tested mice by the flotation and in 70% by the sedimentation method. In the nursery units, H. nana eggs were detected in 10.5% of the tested mice by the flotation and in 24.6% by the sedimentation method. A colony of mice was treated against the tapeworm H. nana with praziquantel and emodepside in doses of 2.574 mg praziquantel/100 g body mass and of 0.642 mg emodepside/100 g body mass. The content of the original pipettes (Profender®) was applied as a spot-on on the back of the neck in the area between the shoulders. The application was repeated three times at 14-day intervals. Seven days after the third therapy no H. nana was found in any of the tested mice in the reproductive or the nursery units. After the treatment, cannibalism was no longer observed. This treatment represented one of the steps aimed at improving animal welfare and preventing potential zoonotic disease. The public health significance of this cestode should receive more attention, especially among people who take care of mice, have them as pets, or feed them to reptiles.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hymenolepiasis/veterinary
Hymenolepis nana
Rodent Diseases/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animal Welfare
Animals
Anthelmintics/therapeutic use
Female
Hymenolepiasis/drug therapy
Hymenolepiasis/parasitology
Laboratory Animal Science
Male
Mice
Praziquantel/therapeutic use
Rodent Diseases/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); 6490C9U457 (Praziquantel)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170614
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1556/004.2017.021

  10 / 1063 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28513991
[Au] Autor:Abdel-Latif M; El-Shahawi G; Aboelhadid SM; Abdel-Tawab H
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Immunoprotective Effect of Chitosan Particles on Hymenolepis nana - Infected Mice.
[So] Source:Scand J Immunol;86(2):83-90, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hymenolepis nana is the most commonly known intestinal cestode infecting mainly human. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of chitosan particles (CSP) to enhance the immune system against H. nana infection. Determination of worm burden, egg output, histopathological changes, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione), goblet (GCs) and mucosal mast cells (MMCs) counts in intestinal ileum was performed. In addition, levels of intestinal mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-9, stem cell factor (SCF), type I and II interferons (IFN)-α/ γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, mucin 2 (MUC2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOs) were investigated using real-time PCR. The results indicated induced reductions in adult worm and egg counts in infected mice after CSP treatment. This was associated with improvement in tissue morphometric measurements and oxidative stress which were altered after infection. Expression levels of iNOs, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-9 were decreased by CSP. Conversely, expression levels of MUC2, IL-4 and SCF increased compared to infected untreated group. In addition, GCs and MMCs counts were normalized by CSP. In conclusion, this study could indicate the immunoprotective effect of CSP against H. nana infection. This was characterized with Th2 anti-inflammatory responses.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chitosan/pharmacology
Hymenolepiasis/prevention & control
Hymenolepis nana/drug effects
Intestines/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Chitosan/chemistry
Chitosan/immunology
Cytokines/genetics
Cytokines/immunology
Cytokines/metabolism
Gene Expression/drug effects
Gene Expression/immunology
Helminth Proteins/genetics
Helminth Proteins/immunology
Helminth Proteins/metabolism
Host-Parasite Interactions/drug effects
Host-Parasite Interactions/immunology
Humans
Hymenolepiasis/immunology
Hymenolepiasis/parasitology
Hymenolepis nana/immunology
Hymenolepis nana/physiology
Interferon-alpha/genetics
Interferon-alpha/immunology
Interferon-alpha/metabolism
Interferon-gamma/genetics
Interferon-gamma/immunology
Interferon-gamma/metabolism
Interleukin-4/genetics
Interleukin-4/immunology
Interleukin-4/metabolism
Intestines/immunology
Intestines/parasitology
Mice
Mucin-2/genetics
Mucin-2/immunology
Mucin-2/metabolism
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/genetics
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/immunology
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism
Parasite Egg Count
Particle Size
Protective Agents/pharmacology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 0 (Helminth Proteins); 0 (Interferon-alpha); 0 (Mucin-2); 0 (Protective Agents); 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); 207137-56-2 (Interleukin-4); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma); 9012-76-4 (Chitosan); EC 1.14.13.39 (Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170731
[Lr] Last revision date:170731
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170518
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/sji.12568


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