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[PMID]: 29313816
[Au] Autor:Foster BL; Ao M; Salmon CR; Chavez MB; Kolli TN; Tran AB; Chu EY; Kantovitz KR; Yadav M; Narisawa S; Millán JL; Nociti FH; Somerman MJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Biosciences, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. Electronic address: foster.1004@osu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Osteopontin regulates dentin and alveolar bone development and mineralization.
[So] Source:Bone;107:196-207, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The periodontal complex is essential for tooth attachment and function and includes the mineralized tissues, cementum and alveolar bone, separated by the unmineralized periodontal ligament (PDL). To gain insights into factors regulating cementum-PDL and bone-PDL borders and protecting against ectopic calcification within the PDL, we employed a proteomic approach to analyze PDL tissue from progressive ankylosis knock-out (Ank ) mice, featuring reduced PP , rapid cementogenesis, and excessive acellular cementum. Using this approach, we identified the matrix protein osteopontin (Spp1/OPN) as an elevated factor of interest in Ank mouse molar PDL. We studied the role of OPN in dental and periodontal development and function. During tooth development in wild-type (WT) mice, Spp1 mRNA was transiently expressed by cementoblasts and strongly by alveolar bone osteoblasts. Developmental analysis from 14 to 240days postnatal (dpn) indicated normal histological structures in Spp1 comparable to WT control mice. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis at 30 and 90dpn revealed significantly increased volumes and tissue mineral densities of Spp1 mouse dentin and alveolar bone, while pulp and PDL volumes were decreased and tissue densities were increased. However, acellular cementum growth was unaltered in Spp1 mice. Quantitative PCR of periodontal-derived mRNA failed to identify potential local compensators influencing cementum in Spp1 vs. WT mice at 26dpn. We genetically deleted Spp1 on the Ank mouse background to determine whether increased Spp1/OPN was regulating periodontal tissues when the PDL space is challenged by hypercementosis in Ank mice. Ank ; Spp1 double deficient mice did not exhibit greater hypercementosis than that in Ank mice. Based on these data, we conclude that OPN has a non-redundant role regulating formation and mineralization of dentin and bone, influences tissue properties of PDL and pulp, but does not control acellular cementum apposition. These findings may inform therapies targeted at controlling soft tissue calcification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29244957
[Au] Autor:Thumbigere-Math V; Alqadi A; Chalmers NI; Chavez MB; Chu EY; Collins MT; Ferreira CR; FitzGerald K; Gafni RI; Gahl WA; Hsu KS; Ramnitz MS; Somerman MJ; Ziegler SG; Foster BL
[Ad] Address:1 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
[Ti] Title:Hypercementosis Associated with ENPP1 Mutations and GACI.
[So] Source:J Dent Res;:22034517744773, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:1544-0591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mineralization of bones and teeth is tightly regulated by levels of extracellular inorganic phosphate (P ) and pyrophosphate (PP ). Three regulators that control pericellular concentrations of P and PP include tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), progressive ankylosis protein (ANK), and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1). Inactivation of these factors results in mineralization disorders affecting teeth and their supporting structures. This study for the first time analyzed the effect of decreased PP on dental development in individuals with generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) due to loss-of-function mutations in the ENPP1 gene. Four of the 5 subjects reported a history of infraocclusion, overretained primary teeth, ankylosis, and/or slow orthodontic tooth movement, suggesting altered mineral metabolism contributing to disrupted tooth movement and exfoliation. All subjects had radiographic evidence of unusually protruding cervical root morphology in primary and/or secondary dentitions. High-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses of extracted primary teeth from 3 GACI subjects revealed 4-fold increased cervical cementum thickness ( P = 0.00007) and a 23% increase in cementum density ( P = 0.009) compared to age-matched healthy control teeth. There were no differences in enamel and dentin densities between GACI and control teeth. Histology revealed dramatically expanded cervical cementum in GACI teeth, including cementocyte-like cells and unusual patterns of cementum resorption and repair. Micro-CT analysis of Enpp1 mutant mouse molars revealed 4-fold increased acellular cementum thickness ( P = 0.002) and 5-fold increased cementum volume ( P = 0.002), with no changes in enamel or dentin. Immunohistochemistry identified elevated ENPP1 expression in cementoblasts of human and mouse control teeth. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel dental phenotype in GACI and identify ENPP1 genetic mutations associated with hypercementosis. The sensitivity of cementum to reduced PP levels in both human and mouse teeth establishes this as a well-conserved and fundamental biological process directing cementogenesis across species (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00369421).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0022034517744773

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[PMID]: 29067719
[Au] Autor:Rehrl S; Schröder W; Müller C; Staszyk C; Lischer C
[Ad] Address:Equine Clinic: Surgery and Radiology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität Berlin, Oertzenweg 19b, D-14163, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Radiological prevalence of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis.
[So] Source:Equine Vet J;, 2017 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:2042-3306
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a painful and progressive dental disease that mainly affects the incisors and canine teeth of aged horses. Diagnosis is based on radiographs to detect early stages of the disease. EOTRH is probably underdiagnosed and its prevalence in Germany unknown. OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the radiological prevalence of EOTRH in a large horse population in Berlin-Brandenburg, Germany. STUDY DESIGN: Prevalence study. METHODS: The study population (142 horses) consisted of all horses 10 years and older that were presented at the Equine Hospital for a routine dental examination. The horses were either presented as clinic patients (CP population) or belonged to a riding school (RS population). Digital radiographs of the incisor dentition were taken and evaluated for changes related to EOTRH, leading to an overall classification for each horse. RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 21 years and ranged from 10 to 37 years. Overall, 94% of all horses had at least minor and 62% had moderate to severe radiological changes of the incisor teeth associated to EOTRH. No horse older than 14 years was without radiological signs of EOTRH and all horses over 28 years of age had at least moderate radiological changes of the incisor teeth. MAIN LIMITATIONS: The clinic patients group might have a bias towards horses with existing dental problems such as EOTRH, because they were presented explicitly for dental care to a clinic. CONCLUSION: Focusing on radiological changes, this study shows that EOTRH is a common condition of horses in Berlin-Brandenburg. With older age, disease is more frequent and radiological changes become more severe. Since no horse older than 14 years was without radiological findings, it is likely that mild changes may be associated with the normal tooth ageing process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/evj.12776

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[PMID]: 29043245
[Au] Autor:Kim HS; Yun PY; Kim YK
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Section of Dentistry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam City, Gyunggi-do Korea.
[Ti] Title:Intentional partial odontectomy-a long-term follow-up study.
[So] Source:Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg;39(1):29, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2288-8101
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The surgical extraction of the third molar is the most frequently encountered procedure in oral and maxillofacial surgery and is related with a variety of complications. This study examined the efficacy of intentional partial odontectomy (IPO) in the third molars which have no periapical lesions and are located near important anatomical structures such as inferior alveolar nerve. METHODS: Seven patients (four males, three females, 39.1 ± 11.6 years), who received IPO to reduce the risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury (IANI), were followed long-term. The treated teeth were horizontally impacted third molars in the mandibular left ( = 5) or mandibular right ( = 4) areas and were all ankylosed with the surrounding alveolar bone. During the IPO, the bone around the crown was removed to expose the crown, and then the tooth was resected at cement-enamel junction (CEJ). Any secondary trauma to the healthy root was minimized and remained intact after primary suture. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 63.2 ± 29.8 months, and all sites showed good bone healing after the crown removal. Also, sensory abnormality was not found in any patients after IPO. In one patient, the bone fragments erupted 4 months after IPO. In other patient, an implant placed on second molar site adjacent to the third molar that received IPO was explanted about 2 years after the patient's persistent discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: In case where high risk of IANI exists, IPO may be chosen alternatively to surgical extraction to reduce the risk of nerve damage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171022
[Lr] Last revision date:171022
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s40902-017-0127-z

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[PMID]: 28943223
[Au] Autor:Cortet-Rudelli C
[Ad] Address:CHRU de Lille, hôpital Huriez, service d'endocrinologie, diabétologie et maladies métaboliques, rue Polonowski, 59037 Lille cedex, France. Electronic address: c.cortet@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:La bouche de l'acromégale. [The mouth of patients with acromegaly].
[So] Source:Presse Med;46(9):831-837, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2213-0276
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Orofacial changes are frequent in acromegaly. Their evolution is slowly progressive. The lips (everted and thickened), the mandibular morphology (prognathism), the tongue (macroglossia), the soft palate and the uvula (increased and thickened), the parodontis (gingival hyperplasia, paradontitis), the teeth (increased interdental spaces, hypercementosis, increased dental mobility, multiple tooth loss) are concerned. Functional consequences are significant (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, malocclusion, pain of the oral maxillofacial area, decrease of the quality of life). They are rarely noticed as the first symptoms of the disease and rarely responsible for the diagnosis of acromegaly because of a progressive development over a long period of time, and because of the low prevalence of the disease which can be unknown by dentists and dental surgeons. When patients are cured or well-controlled, abnormalities of soft tissues improve but are not always completely reversible and bone enlargement remain unchanged. If any corrective surgical procedures are to be performed, this should be carried out only after normalization of GH and IGF I levels.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acromegaly/diagnosis
Facies
Mouth Diseases/diagnosis
Tooth Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acromegaly/blood
Acromegaly/complications
Acromegaly/therapy
Human Growth Hormone/blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism
Mouth Diseases/blood
Mouth Diseases/therapy
Prognosis
Reference Values
Tooth Diseases/blood
Tooth Diseases/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (IGF1 protein, human); 12629-01-5 (Human Growth Hormone); 67763-96-6 (Insulin-Like Growth Factor I)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170926
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28833998
[Au] Autor:Souza S; de Carvalho H; Costa C; Thomaz E
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Maranhão, São Luis, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Association of sickle cell haemoglobinopathies with dental and jaw bone abnormalities.
[So] Source:Oral Dis;, 2017 Aug 20.
[Is] ISSN:1601-0825
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between sickle cell anaemia and trait with dental and jaw bone abnormalities. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Subjects (n = 369) were allocated to three groups: sickle cell anaemia, trait and control. Dental shape, number, size and position and changes in pulp chamber, root and periapex were analysed by intra-oral periapical radiographs. Integrity of lamina dura, quality of cancellous bone and bone trabeculation were also evaluated. Prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Sickle cell anaemia had higher prevalence (PR:8.31) and number of teeth (PR:13.40) with external resorption; higher number of teeth with pulp calcification; partial and total loss of lamina dura; and higher prevalence of changes in trabecular structure of maxilla (PR:6.45) and mandible (PR:5.34). Sickle cell trait showed higher prevalence (PR:1.26) and higher number of teeth (PR:1.98) with partial loss of lamina dura; higher number of teeth with hypercementosis, changes in shape, size, periapex, total loss of lamina dura; and higher prevalence of changes in mandibular trabecular bone (PR:1.43). CONCLUSION: Pulp calcification and external resorption of the root were the most frequent dental alterations in sickle cell anaemia group, while in trait was higher frequency of changes in shape, size, periapex and root. Jaw bone changes were most prevalent in both homozygous and heterozygous subjects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/odi.12742

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[PMID]: 28814183
[Au] Autor:Roux P; Brecheisen M; de Carvalho R; Bergadano A
[Ad] Address:1 Dentovet Sarl, Lausanne, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Diagnoses and Treatment of Dental Disorders in a Research Colony of Macaca fascicularis: A Case Series.
[So] Source:J Vet Dent;34(3):179-189, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0898-7564
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:During daily routine oral examinations in a research colony of nonhuman primates (NHPs, Macaca fascicularis), a variety of oral-dental lesions were identified. A dental care program was established based on these findings. Based on the presence of dental clinical signs and their severity, 31 animals were triaged to be examined and treated by a veterinarian. Clinical examination consisted of visual inspection using a periodontal probe/explorer and full or partial mouth dental radiographs. Treatment was performed during the same procedure. Some animals had a follow-up examination including radiographs months later. Four common dental diseases were diagnosed: periodontal disease, caries, tooth fracture, and tooth attrition. Less frequent were dental abscess, enamel hypomineralization, gingival hyperplasia, hypercementosis, tooth luxation, tooth dysplasia, root resorption, abrasion. Less severe periodontal disease was treated conservatively. If severely affected, teeth were extracted. Well-circumscribed caries without endodontic involvement were treated by composite restoration. Teeth with extensive caries and pulp involvement were extracted. Teeth with exposed pulp were treated via extraction or orthograde root canal treatment. In this case series, 27 (87%) of 31 NHPs exhibited at least 1 moderate to severe dental lesion that required treatment. The presumable improvement in welfare and weight of oral/dental lesions for the overall health status in research NHPs encourages us to continue this program prospectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0898756417722021

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[PMID]: 28814178
[Au] Autor:Earley ET; Rawlinson JR; Baratt RM; Galloway SS; Smedley RC; Scarlett JM; Refsal KR; Dotzel AR; Cox VS; Perkins GA
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Hematologic, Biochemical, and Endocrine Parameters in Horses With Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis.
[So] Source:J Vet Dent;34(3):155-160, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0898-7564
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a frequently diagnosed condition in adult horses. The underlying etiology is still unknown. Hematologic, biochemical, and endocrine values have not been reported in EOTRH-affected horses. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of the study was to describe the hematologic, biochemical, and endocrine parameters in horses with EOTRH. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study of client-owned animals with EOTRH. METHODS: A complete blood count, biochemistry panel, and endocrine profile were performed in horses diagnosed with EOTRH. Diagnosis was based on oral and radiographic examination findings and confirmed with histopathology. RESULTS: Eighteen horses with EOTRH aged 10 to 32 years from various regions of the United States were sampled. The only consistent abnormality on the complete blood cell count and chemistry panel was hypoalbuminemia (88%). Endocrine parameters demonstrated no major abnormalities in the functioning of the thyroid and pituitary pars intermedia. The parathyroid hormone concentration was increased in 7 (47%) of 15 horses with an elevated 25-hydroxy vitamin D in 3 (17%) of 17 horses. Main Limitations: The main limitations of this study are the small sample size and lack of age-matched and management-matched control horses. CONCLUSIONS: The relevance of elevated parathyroid hormone in this study cannot be determined due to the lack of age-based controls and large population studies. With the small population evaluated in this study, there are no obvious hematological, biochemical, and endocrine changes evident. Further evaluation with signalment-matched controls will be necessary to evaluate some trends noted in the laboratory values.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1177/0898756417717039

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[PMID]: 28706789
[Au] Autor:Martin K; Nathwani S; Bunyan R
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Lewsey Road, Luton, LU4 0DZ, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia: A review and novel oral manifestation.
[So] Source:J Oral Biol Craniofac Res;7(2):134-136, 2017 May-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:2212-4268
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia (CMD) is a sclerosing osseous dysplasia characterised by hyperostosis of craniofacial and long bones, resulting in distortion and cranial nerve palsies. We present a case report on the management of a 63 year old female with Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia. This report describes an additional clinical manifestation of hypercementosis, which although well recognised in other sclerosing osseous dysplasias, is not reported in the literature for Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia. We discuss established in vivo studies in mice which link the genetic mutations found in Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia to hypercementosis, and how this report describes the same manifestation in humans. This novel finding can aid the clinician in the management of patients with Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia, and complications that can arise in dentoalveolar surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170717
[Lr] Last revision date:170717
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jobcr.2017.04.007

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[PMID]: 28656927
[Au] Autor:Eren Y; Erdal O; Serdar B; Emin KO; Enes G
[Ad] Address:Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Kirikkale University, 71450 Yahsihan, Kirikkale, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the frequency and characteristics of hypercementosis in the turkish population with cone-beam computed tomography.
[So] Source:Niger J Clin Pract;20(6):724-728, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1119-3077
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of hypercementosis in the Turkish population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective study was performed using CBCT (I-CAT Vision TM Imaging Science International) in 1263 patients admitted to the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Dicle (Diyarbakir, Turkey) between January 2013 and January 2015. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 1152 patient and 29,606 teeth were evaluated with CBCT. The age, gender, location (left vs. right side, maxillary vs. mandibular teeth, incisors, premolars, and molars), and missing teeth were recorded for all patients. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: The Pearson Chi-squared test was used to determine the potential differences. RESULTS: Hypercementosis was observed with a frequency of 2.4%. Of these, 18 of 28 (64.3%) had only 1 tooth with hypercementosis and 10 (35.7%) had more than 1 tooth. It was identified in 42 of the 29,606 teeth examined (0.14%). The lesion was found in 2.47% (n = 14) of females and 2.38% (n = 14) of males. The lesion was detected in 28 molars and 14 premolars, but hypercementosis was not detected in incisors. Of the 42 teeth, 12 (28.6%) maxillary and 30 (71.4%) mandibular teeth were associated with hypercementosis. Of the 28 cases, 20 (59.0%) were unilateral and 8 (41.0%) were bilateral. Of the 20 unilateral cases, 12 (69.6%) were on the right and 8 (30.4%) were on the left side. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the prevalence of hypercementosis has been found 2.4% in the Turkish population. Besides, the lesion has been found more in the mandible than the maxilla, in the molars than the premolars and in the unilateral distribution than the bilateral distribution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170628
[Lr] Last revision date:170628
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/1119-3077.183254


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